Skip to main content

Full text of "73 Magazine (January 1983)"

See other formats





9 Projects 
to Build 
and Use! 

More "Fun" Rigs 

Page 48 

Better 
Breadboards 

Page 52 

Autodialer 
Spectacular 

Page 40 

Blockbuster 

SSB Rig! 

Page 12 

BBC: Queen of 
the Airwaves 

Page 68 

1982 

40/80m, 160m 
Contest Results 



Page 103 






1 


I 




74470 65 


946 



January 1983 $2.49 Vz 
Issue #268 



Amateur Radio's 

Technical Journal 



A Wayne Green Publication 




Pulse King— 100 



Action Machine for 20 



H 



Are home-brew rigs a lost art? Not 
vet! Here's an SSB transceiver you 
can build WBSIPM 

An Alarming Procedure 



V] This false-proof repeater emergen- 

^-^ cv alert won't tie up expensive 

equipment WA1LCF, K1FNX 

Trimming the Fat from ATV 

Why use 3 MHz when 500 kHz will do? 
WB6FHD proposes a way. 

VVB6FHD 

The Forgetful Autodialer Puzzle 

[\~l Even Sherlock couldn't figure out 
^^ how to make an autodialer that re- 



programs with no 
changes Elementary. 
Batie 



hardware 

says dear 
W7BBX 



My Own Silver Mine 

Fyl For W1FLP, reclaiming silver from 

^~^ photographic fi*er is cheap, easy 

and profitable King Midas should 

have had i t so good W1 FL P 

Fun-Equipment Revisited 

[yT Here are higher-band versions of 

^~^ the ever-popular Fun-Mi tter and 

Fun-Amp. They are based on the 

Fun-Philosophy: cheap and simple 

WA0RBR 

The Ultimate Breadboard 

There used to be two styles of proto- 
types—rat's nest and cramped Now 
there is a third style— simple. 

N6BW 

Beating the 
Untraceable Buzz 

[CI Man-made interference doesn't 

**-' have to destroy reception. Not 

when you use WlCVs buzz-beat- 

ing antennas W1GV/4 



12 



24 



32 



40 



46 



48 



52 



The Care and Feeding 

of Optoelectronics 

fy] There are many ways to make these 

^~ ^ devices earn their keep Here is 

one, K3VDB 

International Success Story: 
The BBC 

From its battery of transmitters, the BBC 
fires a daily salvo of news and entertain- 
ment around the world Nn commer- 
cials, either. Peterson 

Active-Filter Design Made Easy 

\IA Usihk this BASIC program, if you 

^™ don't like the design, then scrap it 

AH you lose is a few seconds. 

WD4HPC 

The Cornerstone of Equipment 

Failure: Heat Damage 

The proper heat sink will preserve tran- 
sistors Learn how to keep your circuitry 
from resembling a core meltdown 

S hamburger 

Your January 

Home-Brew Project 

\1 No frills — just a solid $10 SSB ex- 

— titer for HF Who says hams don't 

build anymore? VF7DOD 

King of the Pulse Generators 

One-shot or a train, TTL or CMOS, 
this generator will tit the bill Its 
just what your test bench always 
wanted WA3RJS 



62 



68 



78 



84 



92 



\ 



100 



^m ~*^^^H» ^"^^ 


■H1R= — =J 


Si »-i^ 


"^ 


&-• "i j**^ ° c • 


r y* ~^m 


r~H 




L ■ ■ -"^- ^^ / 


t w 




■ T 


el. ' 


7 ~*nmzji • „ 


w- J 


lEE '^ 


IflBtHJl Jfl 






:.'— : ■■■—■■■ if ~l 


=^-rV 


',:/-. \| 


1 i 'j 


r — ^s * lJ l ■! 


PHi.<- \ J 


• ■' — j — j 


t * * Vv » it 

u 1 <• + ■ — Sn\ 



Repeater Controller— 126 



56 



Never Say Die— 6 
Satellites— 101 
Contests— 102 
Reader 
Service— 114 
Social Events— -115 
Letters— 116 
Circuits— 124 
Review— 126 
RTTY Loop— 130 



Fun!— 132 

Corrections— 134 
DX— 138 
Awards— 140 
New Products— 142 
Ham Help— 144 
Dealer 

Directory— 162 
Propagation— 162 




Radios, Accessories and Prices (October 30, 1982) 









2 


^M m 


B^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^B 










w 




■» 


r 




l^-Sl^ 


«... - Ifi 






* * * 

















.« 



C-2AT 1C- 











- - - 





oneP 



ICOM 



The World System 




21 12-1 Kuh Aw M IkUcvue VtA yHlKM ( 2iK» ) iS^ISS 5351 TomTWocic! Drive, Suiic 507, Oalhs. TC ^S2U Phone 1214 > 620 2780 



5 -STORE BUYING POWER in action! 



®KEIMWOOD 



NEW! 





TR-7950 

2M. 45 WATTS. 
21 CHAN. MEMORY. 



TR-2500 

CALL FOR 
SPECIAL PRICES 



TS- 
930S 

W/ANTENNA 

TUNER 

$1799 w 

SAVE $230 




J SP-930 spkr. 
MC-60A Mic 
YK-88C-1 Filter 



TS-830S 

TRANSCEIVER 

vlFREE 

SP-230 Spkr. 
YK-88C CW Filter 

$949 95 



BARGAIN 

PACKAGE 




A $1084.85 VALUE 




SALE! 




W mggy 

v HANDHELDS 

2 METER FT-208R 



70CM FT-708R 

EACH 

SALE $289 



95 




2 METER h 
AMPLIFIERS 

B-3016 30Win. 160Woul. 
REG. $239.95 $199-95 

B"1 01 6 10W In, 160 W out. 
REG. $279.95 $249.95 

B-1 08 10W In, BOW out. 
REG. $179.95 SI 59.95 

B-23 2Win, 30Wout 
REG $89.95 $79.95 



SALE! 

ANTENNAS/ 
TOWERS 

KLM KT-34A 

4 ELEMENT TRIBANDER 
REGULAR S3S9.95 

SALE $309 

KLM KT-34XA 

6 ELEMENT TRIBANDER 
REGULAR S569-95 

SALE $459 

CALL FOR OTHER KLM PRICES. 

TRI-EX W51 TOWER with 
KLM-KT-34A $1099 

TRI-EX W51 TOWER with 
KLM KT-34XA. $1239 

TRI-EX W51, 51' TOWER 
Reg. $999.95 $829.95 

PRICES ARE FOB CAUF. EXCEPT FOR 
CERTAIN COMBINATIONS INQUIRE 




ICOMl BIG "666" DEALS 



IC-730 

LIMITED QUANTITY. ACT! 




REGULARLY $829 

SALE $666 



IC R-70 

ICOM's GREAT NEW GENERAL 
COVERAGE RECEIVER. 



REG. 
$749 




SALE $666 





QUID mi CUT (UPS. Brown) 

Wl CI CONTINENTAL U S/ 



USA 

EXCEPT FOR SOME ALPHA. TRI EX arid KLM ftEMS 



SERVING H t 
BETTER. 

Norttr south .east., w&st. 



Bob Fftrrwo, 
Jim Rafferty, 
other wolf known h 
give you court*, 
periorMti 




PHONE 



800 



854-6046 




9:30AM to 5:30PM PACIFIC TIME. 
OVER-THE-COUNTER, 10AM to 5:30PM. 

MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY 

CALIFORNIA CUSTOMERS PLEASE PHONE OR VISIT USTEO STORES 




ANAHEIM. CA 92601 

2620 W La Palma. 

(714) 761-3033 (213) 860-2040 

Between Disneyland & KnoM s Berry Farm 



BURLINGAME. CA 94010 

999 Howard Ave , (415) 342*5757 
5 mites south on 101 from S F Airport 



OAKLAND, CA 94609 
2811 Telegraph Ave.. (415) 45V5757 

Hwy 2* Downtown Left 27th off-ramp 



_ 50'- . 
IAF _ -7A ■ OATOWG 



SAN DIEGO, CA 92123 

5375 Kearny Villa Road |61 9) 560-4900 

Hwy 163 A Ciajremoni Mesa Bivd 

METZ - P ) LOG * WK 




VAN NUYS, C A 91401 

6265 Sepurveda Bfvd . (213) 986- 

San Diego Fwy at Victory Bfvfl 



• **€ SU mdmitn v more' 



2212 



-SHUR£< S* 

r*o - vocov 



Prices, specifications descriptions svOjact to change without none* Cahf testdants please add sales re* 



R-X Noise Bridge 




• Learn the truth about 
your antenna. 

• Find its resonant fequency. 

• Adjust it to your operat- 
ing frequency quickly and 
easily. 

If there is one ptece in your station where 
you cannot risk uncertain results rt is rn 
your antenna 

The Palomar Engineers R-X Noise Bridge 
tells you if your antenna is resonant or 
not and. if it is not, whether it is too long 
or too short All this in one measurement 
reading. And it works just as well with 
ham -band -only receivers as with general 
coverage equipment because it gives 
perfect null readings even when the 
antenna is not resonant. It gives 
resistance and reactance readings on 
dipoles. inverted Vees. quads, beams, 
multiband trap d I poles and verticals, No 
station is complete without this up4o^ 
date instrument. 

Why work in the dark? Your SWR meter 
or your resistance noise bridge tells only 
half the story. Get the instrument that 
really works, the Palomar Engineers R-X 
Noise Bridge. Use it to check your 
antennas from 1 to 1 00 MHz. And use it 
in your shack to adjust resonant frequen- 
cies of both series and parallel tuned cir- 
cuits. Works better than a dip meter and 
costs a lot less. 

The price is $59,95 In the U.S. and 
Canada, Add $3,00 shipping/handling. 
California residents add safes tax 



r 




master charge 



Send for FREE catalog describing the 
R-X Noise Bridge and our complete 
line of SWR Meters, Preamplifiers, 
Toroids, Baluns, Tuners, VLF Conver- 
ters, Loop Antennas and Keyers, 



Palomar 
Engineers 

Box 455. Escondido, CA 92025 
Phone: (619) 747-3343 



4 73 Magazine • January, 1983 




AEA once again breaks new 
ground in the code com- 
munications field with the 
new model MBA-RC reader/- 
code converter. The MBA-RC 
decodes Morse, Baudot or 
ASCII signals off the air and 
displays them on a large 32 
character alphanumeric 
vacuum fluorscent display. In 
addition, it will output Morse 
code for keying your transmit- 
ter. It will also generate RTTY 
(Baudot or ASCII AFSK two 
tone output. (170 or 850 Hz 
shifts.) Any of the acceptable 
input codes can be converted 
to any of the specified output 
codes (any speed to any 
speed). If you have any of the 
common Baudot RTTY ter- 
minals as an example, you 
can now send and receive 
Morse and ASCII with your 
keyboard and printer. You can 
even generate ASCII or 
BAUDOT RTTY using your 
Morse hand key or memory 






Get the details. Write for our 
free product catalogue or bet- 
ter yet, see your favorite 
dealer. 

Prices and Specifications subject to 
change without notice or obligation. 

r Software "copyright by AEA. 
ADVANCED ELECTRONIC 
APPLICATIONS, INC. 
P.O. Box C-2160, 
Lynn wood, WA 98036 
(206) 775-7373 
Telex: 152571 AEA INTL 

i\ ^m A Brings you the 
#%■■*#■% Breakthrough! 



INFO 



Manuscripts 

Contributions in the form of manu- 
scripts with drawings and/or photo- 
graphs are welcome and will be con- 
sidered fof possible publication. We 
can assume no responsibility for loss 
or damage to any material. Please 
enclose a stamped, self -addressed 
envelope with each submission. Pay- 
ment for the use of any unsolicited 
material win be made upon accep- 
tance- All contribuiions should be di- 
rected to the 73 editorial of 1 ices. 
"How to Write for 73" guidelines are 
available upon request, 

Editorial Offices: 

Pine Street 
Peterborough NH 03458 
603-924-9*71 



Advertising Offices: 

Elm Street 

Peterborough NH 03456 

Phone: 603-924-7138 

Circulation Offices: 

EJm Street 

Peterborough NH 03458 

Phone- 603^924^9471 

Subscription Rates 

in the United States and Possessions; 
One Year (12 issues) $25.00 
Two Years (24 issues) $33.00 
Three Years {36 issues) $53.00 

Elsewhere: 

Canada and Mexico— $27.97/1 year on- 
ly, U.S. funds. Foreign surface 
mail— $44.97/1 year only, US, funds 
drawn on U.S. bank. Foreign air 
mall— please inquire. 

To subscribe, 

renew or change 

an address: 

Write to 73, Subscription Department, 
PO Box 931, Farmingdale NY 11737, 
For renewals and changes of address, 
include the address label from your 
most recent issue of 73. For gift sub- 
scriptions, include your name and ad- 
dress as weH as those ol gift reci- 
pients. 

Subscription 

problem or 

question: 

Write to 73, Subscription Department, 
PO Box 331, Farmingdale NY 11737. 
Please include an address label. 

73t Amateur Radios TechmoaS Journal 
(ISSN 009&9010) Is published monthly 
toy 73. inc., a subsidiary of Wayne Green, 
Inc., 80 Pine Street, Peterborough NH 
03456. Second class postage paid at 
Peterborough NH 03451 and at addition- 
al mailing offices. Entire contents copy 
fight® 1982. Wayne Green. Inc. All 
rights reserved- No part of this pubiica- 
tlon may be reprinted or otherwise nspro- 
duced without written permission from 
ma publisher. Microfilm Edition— Uni- 
versity Microfilm, Ann Arbor U\ 4S1DC 
Postmaster: Send address changes to 
73. Subscription Services, PO Box 931, 
Fa/mirtgdaJe NY 11737. 



troducing a new dimension... 



i ■ 



i 



Contesters. 
*ers. Handicapped 
erators and General 
pose Ham 
erators: 



Most Advanced 
enna Control 
liable... 

Fhe Only 

Computerized Unit 

fhe Only Talking 

Unit 

rhe Only Scanning 

Unit 

rhe Only 

Programmable Unit 

rhe Only Automatic 

Braking Unit 

it esters: 



-Search seeks out a 
■programmed heading, plus 
res various common head- 
s and automatically scans 
those rare multipliers, 
ng the operator hands-free 
tration and more time for 
itesting, 

ers: 



-Search loads in short path 
j long path headings and 
n the touch of a button, the 
tern works between both 
idings. Plus you have all of 
other features of the Pro- 
ircft to aid you in catching 
t rare DX station. 

idicapped Operators: 

-Search offers ease of 
nation ...control the entire 
tern with just one touch, A 
; loop.. -vocally calls out the 
idings, allowing blind opera* 
5 to accurately program and 
\r their headings. 

leral Purpose Operators: 



-Search has numerous 
s. 

-set beam headings for 
EDS. VHR WORK, and many 
8rs. Current headings can 
ead, by displaying the 
sent directions with LEDS. 
-Search also displays and 
'es the last station worked, 
ch can be recalled by the 
o-Locate system with the 
zh of a button. 




— 



I 




/' 



REC 



CURBED 



4 / 5 r 

/Sa| /ZLI ° LAST 



BRAKE 



WHt 



LAST . 



PRO-SAflCH *> 




Current Heading 
Display 



Last Heading Display 
and Visual Confirmation 
of Computer Instructions 



Programmable 
Keyboard and Memory 

Functions 



; 



Reaching The World 






8 




SCAN 



Pro-Search Is 
Adaptable To Many 
Systems, Simple 
To Install. 



Pro-Search is NOW 
available for most 
popular rotors. CPE. 
HY-GAIN , TELREX , 
WILSON , ALLIANCE , 
and PROP-PITCH . 

Disconnect your 
present antenna 
control system and 
connect ours. 

Some modifications 
are necessary 
depending on type of 
rotor. 

To Order 

1 800-325 4016 
1-314-994-7872 (Missouri) 

Or write: 

Pro-Search Electronics 

A Division of Wurdack and 

Associates, Inc. 

10411 Clayton Road 

Suite 305 

St Louis, Missouri 63131 

"Patent Pending 



£*JUKJ02 



W2NSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

editorial by Wayne Green 




ITS SNOW FUN 

Are you going to be wasting 
your time the second week of 
January chasing some fool 
DXpedition around twenty me- 
ters or are you going to be out 
with a bunch of us on the slopes 
of Aspen, HTing it and having a 
bait? That's the low season in 
Aspen, so the prices are still a 
bargain . . . and it's right after the 
Winter Consumer Electronics 
Show in Las Vegas, if you're in 
ihe electronics industry. 

During the day p Chuck Martin 
WA1KPS (Tufts Electronics) will 
be leading the kamikaze group 
down the expert slopes, while I'll 
be struggling to keep up with the 
geriatric crowd and their walkers 
on the gentler slopes. It is a lot of 
fun to ski with fellow hams,*, 
keeping in touch with HTs. And 
it's even more fun to get togeth- 
er for dinner at some of the fa* 
mous Aspen restaurants and talk 
over the ham industry, DXing, 
and so on. 

If you can get away January 8- 
12. well be skiing out of The 
Limelight Hotel (again), so don't 
miss the Eighth Ham Industry 



Winter Symposium. , .obviously 
an historic event. Were expect- 
ing ham manufacturers there as 
well as dealers, so there should 
be some brisk discussions on 
discounts, service support, need- 
ed new products, technical ad 
vances t and so on. 

THE VIEW FROM OVERSEAS 

With such a heavy percentage 

of our DX contacts going not 
much further than an exchange 
of names, locations, and, possi- 
bly* in some rare cases, a recita- 
lion of the equipment being 
used, not only are we failing 
most of the time to live up to one 
of the fundamental rationales 
for amateur radio— the develop- 
ment of international friend- 
ship—but also we are wasting 
an impressive technology, 
When is the last time you got on 
the air and had a half-hour con* 
tact with someone in a relatively 
rare DX country? 

Rather than lecture you and 
try to make you feel guilty for 
maintaining the most eternal 
tradition of amateur radio, 
meaningless contacts. I'd rather 



NEW BAND APPROVED 

Tt» FCC has approved use of the TG-MHz band, buJ amateur operation is limited 
and me Commission dud no l release the new rule without a cautionary nole 

According to the rule, most ol the frequencies from H}1 to 10.15 MHz are 
available to hams, except for a slice Irom 10.109 to 10.115 MHz, That section is still 
reserved tor government use. 

General . Advanced-, and Extra-class licensees are allowed \o transmit CW and 
RTTY (FSK and AFSK) with a final input power ol up to 250 W. In its decision, the 
Commission cited the 'limited size" of the band and the 'temporary nature" ol the 
ruling. 

The FCCs action J& valid until ihe Senate takes action on ihe WABC treaty, leav- 
ing presiml limitations open for change, Although 30 meters has been a possibility 
Since the 1979 WARC convention, approval of the treaty was delayed. 

Though the FCC previously denied an AHRL petition requesting use of the band, 
the amendment did not directly address the Commission's change of mind, 

"Strong Interest" in the amateur community was cited as a reason for the deci- 
sion, but the Commission warned that since Its action Is subject to future Senate 
decisions about the treaty, the amendment 'may be effective for only a brief 
penod " 

The FCC added that hams would be "ill-advised to invest heavily in equipment 
whtcn can only be used in this band — WB8JLG 



go about this in a positive fash- 
ion. I recognize that one of the 
problems when you meet some- 
one new is to find a field of mu- 
tual interest about which to talk. 
Most of us are so used to our 
own areas that we tend to forget 
that though they are pedestrian 
to us, they might be of con- 
siderable interest to someone 
overseas. 

Sure, the chap in a small town 
in Germany will go to a fair in his 
area just as you may in yours. 
But there the similarity ends. 
While the fair I go to may offer 
Italian hot-sausage sandwiches 
with fried onions and green pep- 
pers, fruit salad, green salad in a 
pita-bread pouch, fried dough, 
french-fried onion rings, french 
fries, do-it-yourself ice cream 
sundaes, and corn on the cob, 
my friend in Germany will be eat- 
ing a wide variety of sausages, 
hot potato satad T grilled fish, 
pigs' knuckles, shashliks, and 
drinking new wine or a special 
seasonally-produced type ol 
beer, At French fairs* the fare is 
again different, but no less 
delicious. 

In order to work toward bring- 
ing amateurs together on a 
worldwide basis, Td like to solic- 
it regular reports on hamming 
overseas via a group of corre- 
spondents. If you are living in 
some area of the world which 
should be reported on in 73. . . 
or if you know someone who 
might be interested in such, I'd 
like to hear from you. 

What I have in mind is a regu- 
lar ... perhaps monthly for 
many areas. . .report on any 
news of interest to hams around 
the world- I think many of us 
would like to know about con- 
tests which are coming up 
which are organized in your 
area. We'd like to know about 
new certificates. We'd like to 



know about any outstanding 
ham conventions. We'd like to 
know about ham products 
which are made in your area. 
We'd like to know more about 
the growth of hamming, any 
special developments, impor- 
tant rule changes, how to get a 
visitor's license, and so on. 

What areas? I'm open to sug- 
gestions. Perhaps we'd like to 
hear from the U.K., Germany, 
France. Benelux, Scandinavia. 
Southern Europe, the Mediterra- 
nean area, the Mideast, India. 
Japan, Southeast Asia. Austra- 
lia-New Zealand, Oceania, 
South America, Ihe Carib- 
bean. , .and so on? 

Regular correspondents will 
not only be paid for the reporting 
work, but also will get special 
press passes from the maga- 
zine, special Q5L cards, busi- 
ness cards, and other such doc- 
uments to help them with their 
reporting contacts. 

This would be a good medium 
for bringing up area problems 
for world discussion. It would 
help us know more about com- 
ing and past DXpedtttons, We 
might be able, with such a wide- 
spread correspondent system, 
to develop some sort of network 
of ham help to meet traveling 
hams and make them welcome. 
We would be better able to keep 
things like local net frequencies 
known, repeater channels publi- 
cized, and so forth. 

I would love to have some 
correspondents from Iron Cur- 
tain countries, recognizing that 
they might prefer to be paid in 
magazine subscriptions and 
books rather than American 
cash, which can be a problem, 

If you have any good friends 
in spots around the world who 
you think might be able to pro- 
vide a continuing series of inter- 
esting reports, you might drop 
them a line with a copy of this 
editorial and suggest the idea. 
Or you could bring it up on the 
air. . .give you something of in- 
terest to talk to them about, The 
prestige of being published in 
an international magazine can 
help a person substantially, 
sometimes. I remember when I 
first ran into that. It was in 1956 
and I was visiting St, Thomas 
and Dick Spenceley KV4AA. I 
was the editor of CQ at the t ime, 
which I didn't think of as being 
of much importance. Well, I 
stopped by a store downtown, 
happened to mention Dick, and 
was told how important he was, 
doing a DX column lor an inter- 
national magazine! Hmmm. It 



6 73 Magazine • January, 1983 





m 


HHI 


TtMfc'fl 




" 






mti 



_A J / ' 



i nx 



II Hi I | 



* h* c a u. u 



- fHflPtdtlW 



TUWJNG IPfED 



_j>W J Ml & i i, ; : 



FLOCK 



OMM 



FUNCTION 



TIMt«T 



M*Vfl 



WtMPHT 



MODE 



o^**« KM 



KENWOOD 



Sj-i-f^ j i 



» HT 



gain 






M * c *» N ^T*ouT ilm , w 




uawtf 








SSB, CW, AM, FM, digital VFO's, 10 memories, 
memory and band scan, dual 24-hour clocks... 



R-2000 

The R-2000 is an all mode SSB* CW, AM* 
FM receiver that covers 150 kHz— 30 MHz 
in 30 bands. New microprocessor con- 
trolled operating features and an UP 
conversion PLL circuit provide maximum 
flexibility and ease of operation to 
enhance the excitement of listening to 
stations around the world. Key features 
include digital VFO's. ten memories that 
store frequency, band, and mode informa- 
tion, memory scan, programmable band 
scan, fluorescent tube digital display, 
and dual 24 -hour clock with timer. 

R-2000 FEATURI 

• Cover« 150 kHz- 30 MHz in 30 bands. 
Uses innovative UP-converslon digitally 
controlled PLL circuit UP/DOWN band 
switches [I -MHz step}, VFO's continuously 
tuneable across 150 kHz— 30 MHz. 

• All mode: USB, LSB, CW, AM, FM. 

Provides expanded flexibility in receiving 
various signal types. Front panel mode 
selector kevs. with LED indicators, 

• Digital VFO's for best stability. 

50-Hz step, switehable io 500 Hz or 5-kHz. 
using front panel pushbutton switches, 
F, LOCK switch provided, 

• Ten memories store frequency, band, 
and mode data. 

Complete Information on frequency, band, 
and mode is stored in memory, assuring 
maximum ease of operation. Each mem- 
ory may be tuned as a VFO, Original 
memory frequency may be recalled. 
AUTO. M switch for automatic storage of 
current operating data, or. when off. selec- 
Uve storage of data using M. IN switch. 



■ Lithium battery memory back-up. 
(Est. 5 yr- life J 

' Memory scan. 

Scans all memories, or may be 
programmed to scan specific memories. 
HOLD switch Interrupts scanning, Fre- 
quency, band, and mode are automatically 
selected tn accordance with the memory 
channel bein^ scanned. The scanning 
lime is approximately 2 seconds 
per channel. 

Programmable band scan. 
Scans automatically within the pro- 
grammed bandwidth. Memory channels 9 
and establish upper and lower scan 
limits. HOLD switch interrupts scanning. 
Frequency may be adjusted, using the 
tuning control, during scan HOLD. 

Fluorescent tube digital display 
(100 Hz resolution). 

Built-in 7 digit fluorescent tube digital 
display indicates frequency or time, plus 
memory channel number DIM switch pro- 
vided. The display may be switched to 
indicate CLOCK -2. FREQUENCY, CLOCK I, 
and timer ON or OFF bv the front panel 
FUNCTION switch. 

Dual 2 4 -hour quartz clocks, with timer. 

Permits programming two different time 
zones. Timer for ON and OFF program- 
ming, Timer REMOTE output on rear 
panel (not for AC power). 

Three built in IF filters with NARROW/ 
WIDE selector switch. (CW filter 
optional.] 

6 kHz wide or 2.7 kHz narrow on AM. 
2.7 kHz automatic on SSB. 2.7 kHz wide 
on CW, or with optional YG-455C filter 
installed. 500 Hz narrow. 15 kHz auto- 
matic on FM, 

Squelch circuit, all mode, built-in, with 
BUSY indicator. 



• Noise blanker built-in. 
Eliminates pulse -type noise on SSB. 
CW. and AM. 

• Large front mounted speaker 

• Tone control. 

• RF step attenuator. (0-10-20-30 dB.) 
Four step attenuator, plus antenna fuse. 

• AGC switch. (Slow-Fast.) 

• *&" meter with SINPO W S* scale, 

■ High and low impedance antenna 
terminals. 

A high impedance (500 ohm) terminal. 
and a low impedance 150 ohm) co-axial 
connector are provided. 

• 100/120/220/240 VAC t or 13,8 VDC 
operation. (Optional DCK-1 cable kit 
required for 13.8 VDC. J 

Other features. 

• RECORD output jack. 

•Audible "beeper* (through speaker I. 

• Carrying handle. 

• Headphone jack. 

• External speaker Jack. 

Optional accessories: 

• HS-4, HS-5. HS-6 headphones. 

• DCK-1 DC cable kit 

• YG -455C 500Hz CW filter. 

• HC-10 World digital quartz clock. 

More information on the R-2000 Is 
available from all authorized dealers of 
Trio-Kenwood Communications 
1111 West Walnut Street 
Compton, California 90220. 

KENWOOD 

pacesetter tn amateur radio 



Specifications and prices are subject to change without notice or obligation. 






STAFF 



PU&USHEWEDITOB 
Wayne G*ven WJNSQH 

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT 
Stwry Snrtilfiie 

ASSISTANT POBU5HER/FDHOR 
Jtrtf DeTny W&68TH 

MANAGING EDITOR 
Jotin fiurn«Ei 

ASST MANAGING EDITOR 
Susan PbtiEM'tN 

ETOTOmAi ASSISTANTS 
Nancy HoyO 



TECHWCAt EDITOft 
Ave*? L J«m*tr*t W8BJLG 

ASSISTANT 

TO THE PRESIDENT 

M*]1lt*w5fl*fhKAllEI 

ASSOCIATES 

flpG*rT dakpf WB2GFE 

Jonn Edward* KI21I 

BUI Gosn*y KCTC 

Sanger Green 

CnM Hami VPJML 

Or Mare L«a*ey WAJAJR 

j h Naiton 

B«IIPflAameJtWAerTP 

Palaf Stark K20AV* 



PRODUCTION MANAGE P 

PUBLICATIONS 

Nancy SUmon 

ASST PRODUCTION 

MANAGE REPUBLICATIONS 

Mkchael Wu'[ |r ■ 

ADVERTISING GRAPHICS 
MANAGERS 

Sea it W Phil brick 
Fiona OavJai 
Brgce Hfhdln 
Jane Preston 

PRODUCTION 

Frincaa Banian 

Unde Ore* 

Daniel Dyer 

Phil Cerici 

Dttina Harlwell 

Louis Mirmi 

Dlanne K. FW&on 

Anne HocchlCH 

Mary Seavbr 

Deborah Stone 

Thareea Vervillt 

Judl Wimb«rly 

DavKJ Wozmah 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

T nomas VINenauve 

Sandra Dufofrtle 

, Laurie Jamison 

Irent Vail 

Rdber? M ViNeneuve 

TYPESETTING 

Sara BacJisi" 

Marie Barker 

Malady Sedatl 

Mierwe DasRrochera 

Jennifer Fay 

Lynn Hunet 

Lirnt* Locke 

Nancy Wilson Newman 

Debfcit Ngllinrj 

KaianSlewiri 



GENERAL MANAGER 
Deora Wett>afbae 

CONTROLLER 
J Murpny 



ACCOUNTING MANAGER 
Knud K«J»w KVAG&1 

CIRCULATION MANAGER 
Patncka Rrrama 

BULK SALES MANAGER 
Omnia Boudiiaau 

ADVERTISING 

60^92* rue 

jimG". CLLMgr, 

Nancy CiaPipa. Aasl Mgr 

Rosa Kanyoo KA1GAV 

CornaJia Tiytar 






sure cut a lot of ice in St. 
Thomas, I was sorry to hear thai 
Dick passed away recently... 
we'll all miss that incredible fist 
of his. Any serious CW operator 
could tell Dick instantly by the 
perfection of his fist. 

Please give me a hand with 
this so that we cart bring ama- 
teurs worldwide together a bit. 
The end result will be a lot more 
interesting things for us to talk 
about. - .perhaps bringing more 
DX operators onto our bands. 
Ops in rare countries sure get 
sick of endless demands for in- 
stant contacts and QSL cards. I 
get ham magazines from the 
U,K.. South Africa. Malaysia, Au- 
stralia, and so on, so 1 have a fair 
idea of what is going on . . , but 
99.99% of you donl have that 
sort of input or the resources to 
pay for such a wide variety of 
magazines. Columns devoted to 

Continued on page 118 




OM MILT KSPAW 



20NE 37 



MILTON & CHARLOTTE ERTELT 
P.O BOX 30514, NAIROBI, KENYA 



QSL OF THE MONTH 

This- months winning QSL comes from a Baptist mission in Kenya, the home of Milton 
{5Z4CD and Charlotte t5Z4CM> Ertelt. The design is simple ami informative, using e*i*y two 
colors lo achieve a striking contrast. 

Few cards are as succinct as this one. tel ling the reader at a glance where m the world that 
station is located. And from a distance. Charlotte and Milton's calls stand out clearly/, leav^ 
tng no doubt that this QSL is probably the pride of many a DXer's shack 

EnTenng ?3's QSL contest is easy— send your QSL, m an envelope, to: Editorial Offices. 
73> Peterborough NH 03458, Specify a book from 73ts Radio Bookshop, if your card is 
chosen, we'll be happy to send the book along to you. Entries which are not in an envelope 
or do not specify a book will not be considered. 



Well ... I Can Dream, Can't I? 



by Bandel Linn K4PP 




a 



I don't do anything much! He calls CO and answers all questions! 



?* 



8 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



Reader Service for facing page **1S~* 



A microthin, synthesized, 
programmable, sub-audible 
tone encoder that fits inside 
the ICOM IC-2AT. 



Need we say more? 

$2995 




«_ — 



J i - 



it* 



;-, 604 1 



t * ' 



Z$ 




& 



Mfc 



*» 



* 







Q k! 





COMMUNICATIONS 
SPECIALISTS 

426 West Taft Avenue. Orange, CA 92667 
800/854-0547 Cal if om ia : 7 1 4/998-3021 




m2 tNCOMM. rwc 




— This Utrfe Beauty is the firet 
of our compact, low profile amplifiers for 
use with handheld radios. For VHF 
operations, this unit produces 10W to 
2SW output with drive from your 05W 
to 3W handheld. Excellent for mobile 
use rn your car 

Turn it on with the convenient front 
panel controls, including Power LED 
and Transmit LED, or slip the package 
under the seat out of sight and out 
of mind. 

Low insertion loss on receive and selec- 
table power level design provides low 
VSWR to the transceiver. 

Use with any talkie from 0-5W to 3W 
for 10W to 25 W output 

The HL-32V operates linear mode for 
SSB or FM (switch selected}, and the 
best news of all: the price is only 
S89.95 suggested retail! At your favorite 
dealer now! 




New Product Preview — An- 
other super compact from Tokyo Hy- 
Power Labs This one is for UHI7 and 
it's beautiful, with the controls on the 
brushed metal face panel to make oper- 
ation as easy as touch-and-go. 

The uftra compact HL-20U is a basic am- 
plifier for all UHF handheld radios, and 
it can accept input levels from 200m W 
to 3W, to produce a big 20W output 



Your UHF handheld operations have 
never expenenced anything like this sur- 
prising little amplifier from Tokyo Hy- 
Power Labs- Price and availability of the 
HL-20U wrll be announced soon 



© TOKYO HY-POWER LABS, INC. 




Tokyo Hy-Power Labs' HC-150 tuner, with an accurate 2Q0W 3-30 
MHz power meter/VSWR bridge and sturdy, quality-built coax or 
wire fine antenna coupler, provides smooth, precision matching from 
any barefoot transceiver to antenna between 1 and 200 ohms. For 
a most reasonable sum of $99.95. 

If stompin* through the QRM at the edges of the band, where 
somehow the DX always seems to be, and where the VSWR usually 
heads for the sky, is your kind of thing; the HC-200G is your kind of 
coupler. It can provide a matched antenna, while ready for both 
forward and reflected power at the same time on the accurate dual 
meter VSWR/wattmeten At $349.95 suggested retail, the HC-2Q00 
can handle the output resulting from the rjII legal limit input to your 
linear amplifier 

The next time you want to make a lumpy fine flat or to make a long 
line perform as it should, use a quality built quality performing Tokyo 
Hy-Power Labs antenna coupler 



Long the quality leader among fine 
Japanese communications equipment 
manufacturers. TOKYO HY-POWER 
LABS now makes these outstanding 
units available to you through American 
dealers. Now you can get our advanced 
features and quality at your kind of 
prices. 



(7/ TOKYO HY-POWER LABS, INC. 

^^ SAITAMA, JAPAN 

Distributed by 
Encomm, Inc. 

2000 Avenue G, Suite 800. Pfano, Texas 75074 
Phone (214) 4234024 TLX 79-4783 ENCOMM DAL 



^2W 



^^■MM^M 



When it comes to 

QSLs... 




it's the 

ONLY BOOK! 

US or Foreign Listings 



1983 





NOW READY! 



Here they arei The latest editions of the 
world-famous Radio Amateur Callbook 
are available now. The U,S. edition 
features over 400,000 listings, with over 
75,000 changes from last year. The 
Foreign edition has over 370,000 listings, 
over SO ,000 changes. Each book lists calls 
and the address Information you need to 
send QSL's, Special features include call 
changes, census of amateur licenses, 
world-wide QSL bureaus, prefixes of the 
world, International postal rates, and 
much more. Place you order for the new 
1983 Radio Amateur Callbooks, available 
now. 



Each Shipping Total 



D USCHIbook 

O Foreign 
Callback 



$19.95 $3,05 S23,00 
$10.95 $3.05 $22,00 






Order both hooks at the same time for 
$41.95 including shipping. 

Order from your dealer or directly from 
the publisher. AM direct orders add shipping 
charge. Foreign residents add $4*55 for 
shipping. Illinois residents add 5% sales tax. 



SPECIAL OFFER! 

Amateur Radio 

Emblem Patch 

only $2.50 postpaid 



Pegasus on blue field, red lettering, 3" wide 
x 3" high. Great on Jackets and caps. 




ORDER TODAY' 



^61 



RADIO AMATEUR 




Oept. 



OO 



k 



INC. 



B 



925 Sherwood Drive 

Lake Bluff, IL 60044 , USA 



HUSTLE! 

HF MOBILES 
DELIVER 
FIXED STATION 
PERFORMANCE 



Hustler HF antennas deliver 
outstanding signal reports — 
wherever you're mobile! 

Design your own HF mobile 
from a full selection of top- 
quality; U.S.-made stainless 
steel ball mounts, quick dis- 
connects, masts, springs, and 
resonators. You can caver any 
6-to-80-mefer band. Choose 
from medium or high power 
resonators with broadest 
bandwidth and lowest SWR for 
optimum performance an any 
band. Easy band change and 
garagfng with Hustlers fold- 
over mast. too. 



Ask any ham — the best HF 
mobiles on the road come 
from: Hustler — still the 
standard of performance. 




3275 North "B" Avenue 
Kisslmmee, Florida 32741 



A* 



£CP«PI4T 



Hl-Q BALUN 



• rye cjipqles yagis inverted 
vees & doublets 

» Replaces center insulator 

• Puis power in antenna 

• Bfoadbanded 3-4D MHj 

• Small (iqhlweiQfit and 
weatherproof 

■ 1 % Impedance ratio 

• For lull legal power and mote 

• Helps eliminate TVi 

• Wiih SO 239 connector 

only $12.95 

Hl-Q 



2 



7 



TO 



Hi-Q 



fir 




*D*t J JO 



ANTENNA 
INSULATOR 



Small rugged iigrrtweQM 

Aeainerpfoor 

Replaces cente* nsufalur 

Nancies frufl legal po*e» 
aflti more 

$6 95 Wm SO ^^ connector 

Hl-Q ANTENNA 
END INSULATORS 

Rugged. IrghtweigtU, tn^ee 
tion molded of top quality 
material. w*(b high dielec- 
tric qualities and excellent 
weal her afcithty End insula 
tors are constructed in a 
spiral unending lash ion to 
permit wwindin§ of loadmg 
coiJs or partial winding tor 
tuned traps. 

■ 
»Guy .*- f- steam »nsulaiois 

■ Enrt Of I eritSl MvylalOIS *Qt 
dnfrnnaii 

• Construction of antenna i 
mg cofls a? rnulhtaand tra| 




M.95 




MODEL BANDS LENGTH 

Qtpiifll 

D-flO 80,75 

D-40 40,15 
D-20 20 

D-15 15 

D-10 10 

Shortened 6!pol»t 



pnrcE with 
HI O BALUN 



WITH Hi O 

CENTER 

INSULATOR 



SDB0 
SD-40 

P*rillcl dipol** 

PO^OIO 
PD4010 
PD6Q40 
PO4020 



60,75 
40 



80,40,20,10.15 
40,20,10.15 

80.40.15 
40,20.15 



130 

ee 

33 
22 

16 



90 

45 

130 
66 

130 
B6 



$31.95 
28,95 
27,95 
26.95 
25.95 

35.95 
32,95 

43.95 
37.95 
39 95 
33.95 



$27,95 
24,95 
23,95 
22.95 
21.95 

31.95 
21.95 

39 95 
33.95 

29.95 



D«pCil* |hnfl»tfi*ti fin'y MITW B1 sncluUTO in SD monJ*l» 



sao 

S-40 



80.75 
40 



$11.95 pr 
$10.95 pr 



All antennas a/e complete with a HI-0 Balun or HI*Q 
Antenna Cenier insulator, No. 14 antenna wire, cer- 
amic Insulators. 100 nylon antenna support rope |SD 
models only 50} rated for full legal power, Antennas 
may be used as an inverted V and may also be used 
by MARS Of SWLs 

Antenna accessories— available with antenna orders 
Nylon guy rope 450# test 100 feet $4.49 

Ceramic iDogbone Type) antenna insulators $1 50 pf 
S0239 coax camnectors 56 

Ait prices are postpaid USA 48 
Av aiiabte at your favorite dealer or order direct from 



y* n Dearer Inquiries Inviled 

Gorden 
Engineering 

BOX 21305 B. SOUTH EUCLID, OHIO 44121 



See Ltst of Attverrt$er$ an page t 14 



73 Magazine • January. 1983 11 



Frank H Perkins WB51PM 
Boa 13642 
Arlington TX 76013 



Action Machine for 20 

Are home-brew rigs a lost art? Not yet! 
Here's an SSB transceiver you can build. 



(designed and built 
mini'ceiver 20 to learn 
something about SSB trans- 
ceiver design. Several times 
in the course of the project I 
became convinced that I 
was learning more about 
SSB transceiver design than 
I ever wanted to know! Any- 
way, mini'ceiver has worked 
out and it's quite a conversa- 
tion piece on the air. You 
can run mini'ceiver from a 
lantern battery, which opens 
up a number of possibilities. 
I have made an effort to use 
readily-available parts and 
easy-to-tune circuits in 



mini'ceiver, so I feel you will 
have a good shot at making 
it work if you want to give it 
a try. 

This article covers 
mini'ceiver's circuit opera- 
tion once over lightly and 
then, in some detail, the cir- 
cuit schematics. No math or 
theory here, just a shirt- 
sleeve discussion of the cir- 
cuitry and how well it seems 
to work. If you are game at 
I his point, I'll then give you 
some hints on how to build 
and tune up mini'ceiver, and 
I'll wind up with some ideas 
on accessories, possible de- 




Photo A. Mini'ceiver 20 is an SSB transceiver boiled down to 
the basics. 

12 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



sign alternatives, and Opera* 
tion. If you've always want- 
ed to build a good size proj- 
ect from scratch but never 
quite got around to it, this 
article is written for you. I'll 
try to give you an idea of 
what you've been missing. 

Mini'ceiver Circuit 
Operation 

Let's first look at Fig. 1, 
mini'ceiver's block diagram. 
Mini'ceiver is a 20-meter sin- 
gle-conversion superhetero- 
dyne transceiver boiled 
down to the basics A con- 
ventional 9-MHz i-f frequen- 
cy is used. 

In the receive mode, an 
incoming signal in the 
14. 25-14. 30-MHz range is 
routed through the receiver 
antenna switch to a dual- 
gate MOSFET mixer where it 
is mixed with the vfo signal 
(vfo range is 5.250-5.300 
MHz). The mixer's differ- 
ence output, at 9 MHz, is 
routed through the receiver 
side of the T/R filter switch 
to the four-pole crystal 
filter, which provides the re- 
ceiver's selectivity. The i-f 
output from the crystal filter 
is amplified by a single* 
stage IC amplifier which 
can provide a voltage gain 
of up to about 1000 The 



output from the i-f amplifier 
is mixed with the 8 9985- 
MHz bfo in the MOSFET 
product detector, recover- 
ing, typically, 5 mV of audio. 

The audio output from 
the product detector is am- 
plified by the low-level au- 
dio amplifier and then 
routed to the age amplifier 
and the volume control. The 
age amplifier further ampli- 
fies the audio to around five 
volts peak-to-peak and then 
detects this signal to devel- 
op the age control voltage. 
Meanwhile, audio from the 
volume control is routed to 
the audio power amplifier 
and on to the speaker jack 
While in the receive mode. 
the transmit circuitry is dis- 
abled by switching off the 
+ T supply voltage. 

In the transmit mode, the 
+ T voltage is switched on 
as the +R voltage is 
switched off, enabling the 
transmitter circuitry as the 
receiver circuitry drops out 
Low-level speech signals 
from the microphone are 
amplified to about 1.5 volts 
peak-to-peak by the speech 
amplifier and applied to the 
balanced-modulator audio 
input. Here the audio is 
mixed with the bfo signal in 
an IC double-balanced mod- 



VFG 

121 Vhx 



R£C£'V£R 

ANT SWITCH 



i 



RECEIVER 

MtKER 



O 






'1 



T/H VIXTAGE 
SWITCH 




I.DW-LCVEL 
UIIT AMP 



DmvEft 



T/fl FILTER 
SWUCH 



9MHf 

CRYSTAL FJLTER 



SPEECH 
AMPLIFIER 



I-F 
AMPLIFIER 




PRODUCT 
DETECTOR 






J 


i 
























balanced 
modulatoa 

II 


BFO 
A448&MH1 





LOW -LEVEL 
ALL) I 3 AMP 



F/g. T. Mini'ceiver 20 block diagram. 



FinAl 
amP^iF»ER 



AUDIO POWER 
AMPLIFIER 



■|2V 
4 




ON /OFF S* 
9 F LT£B 



~U 



fl^ 



<d 



: .:: 



ulator The double-srdeband 
output from the modulator 
is routed through the trans- 
mit side or the T/R filter 
switch to the crystal filter 
The crystal filter strips off 
the unwanted lower side- 
band and routes the 9-MHz 
SSB signal to the transmit 
mixer At the transmit mixer, 
the 9-MHz SSB signal is 
mixed with the vfo signal 
and the sum output at 14 
MHz is developed in the 
transmit mixer's tuned out- 
put circuit. 

The 14MHz SSB signal 
next is amplified by two 
MOSFET low-level transmit 
amplifiers to about 600 mV 
peak-to-peak. The driver 
stage boosts this signal to 
about 200 ftiW and the final 
amplifier to about 15 W. 
The output from the final rs 
sent to the antenna. Since 
the receiver antenna switch 
is open in the transmit 
mode, the receiver mixer is 
protected from overload. 

The + R and + T power- 
supply voltages are alter- 
nately switched on under 
the control of the micro- 
phone PTT switch. All in all, 
mini'ceiver is a simple and 
straightforward design. 

T/R Voltage Switch 

Almost every modern SSB 
transceiver design incorpo- 
rates digital logic, and 
mini'ceiver is no exception. 
Refer to Fig. 2, the T/R volt- 
age switch schematic. A 
4093BE CMOS quad 
Schmitt NAND gate is the 
heart of this circuit. When 



the PTT switch is open, +12 
V dc is applied to R1 and on 
through the gate intercon- 
nections to pull R3 low at 
pin 10. This turns on Q1 and 
supplies + R to most of the 
receiver circuitry, 4-R also 
turns on Q4, which helps 
pull down the +T voltage 
on a transmit-to-receive 
transition. Meanwhile, pin 
11 is at +12 V dc and Q2, 
+ T, and Q3 are off. 

When the PTT switch is 
closed, the input side of R1 
is grounded, which first al- 
lows pin 10 to go to 12 V dc, 
shutting off Q1 and Q4, 
About 30 milliseconds later 
pin 11 will go low, turning on 
Q2 and Q3, supplying + T to 
the transmit circuitry and 
clamping + R to ground. R2 
and C3 account for the time 
that both +R and +T are 
off during a receive-to- 
transmit or transmit-to- 
receive transition R1 and C2 
simply form a glitch filter. 
Schmitt inputs were chosen 



for reliable logic switching 
with the slow rise times pro- 
vided by R1-C2 and R2-C3, 

The vfo, biro, audio power 
amplifier, and the collectors 
of the transmitter driver and 
final amplifier are continu- 
ously supplied with +12 V 
dc from the input power 
jack. CI provides dynamic 
filtering for operating from 
dry cell batteries, etc. 

Vfo and Bfo 

Fig. 3 provides the vfo and 
bfo schematics. We'll start 
with the latter The bfo is a 
grounded-base crystal oscil- 
lator designed to work with 
a series-resonant 8,998500- 
MHz crystal. It is easily 
tuned ± 300 Hz, which al- 
lows you to tailor the 
'sound " of the rig some- 
what. It will provide a 5-V 
peak-to-peak output when 
loaded by the product de- 
tector and balanced modu- 
lator. Note that it is en- 
closed in a minibox. This is a 



must. I first had the bfo cir- 
cuit on the receiver main 
board, I also had about two 
volts of bfo in the i-f amplifi- 
er output, plus all the local 
AM radio stations, etd Keep 
the bfo shielded from the i-f 
amplifier; that is sage 
advice. 

The vfo consists of a buf- 
fered Hartley oscillator de- 
signed along recently-pub- 
lished guidelines. 1 I found 
the vfo to be quite stable 
Tuning is very fast; you may 
want to use a reduction 
drive if you don't have a 
steady hand. R18 allows the 
vfo output to be adjusted to 
5 V peak-to-peak, The vfo al- 
so is built in a minibox, pri- 
marily for its own protec- 
tion. The box helps stabilize 
temperature and shield the 
vfo from other rf signals. 

Receiver Rf Section 

CR3, CR4, R24. R25, R26, 
C28, and C29 form the re- 
ceiver antenna switch. In the 



IZVDC 



PHONO 

JACK 



I2V0C 



TO PTT 
IfcPUT 




Fig. 2. T/R voltage switch. 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 13 



YFO 



1 








cr 


CI 




IQO 


(80 




NPQ 


NPO 




TO TflftNSMlT 
> AND RECEIVER 
MIXERS 



r- _ : 



r 






^ 



01 



*7* 



/W 




t» | cat 

a 99£5£R j-nJ BO 



1 



R2» 
i Ok 



I- 



T 









su 

1000 
5V 



iii 






L3 



I 

|P*0«0 -*C* 



m 



.01 



f 



hi ** 

iOO 



1 
I 



C25 



I 

I 
I 
I 

l 



-> TO PROOUCT 
DETECTOR AW 
BALANCED 
HODULATOH 



I 



500#F 



■ vDC 

_! 



utmeos enclosure 



receive mode, R25 supplies 
current to CR3-R24 and CR4- 
R26from + R, CR3andCR4 
are forward-biased with 
about 5 mA dc and appear 
to small rf signals from the 
antenna as 25-Ohm resis- 
tors. Receiver signals thus 
easily can pass through C2B 
and C29, which aredc block- 
ing capacitors, and the 
two forward-biased diodes 
to the input transformer of 
the mixer 

When the bias to the di- 
odes is removed in the trans- 
mit mode, the diode switch 
opens. Notice that when the 



Fig. J. Via and bio schematics. 

rf output from the final am- 
plifier is positive, CR3 is 
reverse-biased so little sig- 
nal makes it to the mixer in- 
put transformer When the rf 
output from the final is neg- 
ative-going, CR3 is forward- 
biased so the rf signal ap- 
pears at R25. However, CR4 
is now reverse-biased, block- 
ing the rf output from reach- 
ing the mixer input. 

The use of this type of di- 
ode switch eliminates the 
need for a mechanical relay, 
Purists would probably add 
some rf chokes in series 
with the biasing resistors 



and might use PIN diodes, 
however, I'm not a purist 
— just cheap 

The receiver mixer em- 
ploys the often-used 40673 
(Qtt) which is adequate for 
this application. We now 

come to the second diode 
switch in the mini'ceiver, 
which is used to switch sig- 
nals to the crystal filter from 
either the receiver mixer or 
the double-balanced modu- 
lator CRS forms half the 
switch; CR8(Fig. 6) forms the 
other half. When + R is on, 
I R5 is conducting about 6 



mA dc, again providing a 
low-loss path to small rf sig- 
nals. Meanwhile, CR8 is 
back-biased, isolating the 
balanced modulator from 
the receiver-mixer output 
and crystal-filter input R30 
is the biasing resistor for 
CR5, R31 establishes a suit 
able input impedance for 
the crystal-lattice filter 

The crystal-lattice filter 
uses four crystals, two cut 
for series-resonance 750 Hz 
below center frequency and 
two cut for series-resonance 
750 Hz above center fre- 
quency The overall 6-dB 
bandwidth appears to be 
about 2200 Hz Unwanted 
sideband suppression is 
around 26 dB (5%) at 1000 
Hz, which is OK for QRP 

While the filter can I 

built for under $30, you 
won't hurt my feelings if 
you use a commercial filter 
here. Remember to adjust 
R31 and R32 to suit the com- 
mercial filter's termination 
impedance if you decide to 
go this route 

I've always had good luck 
with the MCI 350 i-f ampli- 
fier (IC2). It exhibits high but 
stable gain when properly 
terminated and smooth for- 
ward age action, assuming 
you keep the bfo signal out 
of it The value of R40 and 
the turns ratio of L6 were 
chosen for high stable gain I 







Photo B, Typical miniceiver SSB voice waveform. About 
1.5-W p-p output. 

14 73 Magazine * January, 1983 




Photo C Output spectrum consists primarily of the funda 
mental and harmonics. All spurs are more than 40 dB down. 



^eotlc a^rry 






*•*¥*: i 4 t 



By popular acclaim - the leader and king of radio teleprinter communications - the HAL 
DS3100ASR and ST6000. When combined with the MSO3100 Message Storage Option and a 

hard-copy printer, you have the premier RTTY station. Discriminating operators the world- 
over choose the DS3100 and ST6000 for their stations over any other equipment. The DS3100 
and ST6000 have set new standards of comparison for commercial and amateur RTTY data 
communications; they are representative of the high standards of quality and performance for 
which HAL is known throughout the world. Put your best RTTY signal forward with the 
DS3100 and ST6000! 

• Send and receive ASCII, Baudot and Morse code 

• Full length 72 character lines and 24 line screen 

• True "A3R" operation — pretype while receiving 

• 50 Line pretype, on-screen transmit buffer 

• 150 Line receive display buffer 

• MSO3100 adds 450 lines of MAILBOX message storage 

• P31 green, 12 inch display screen is built-in 

• Control functions are clearly marked on keytops 

• On-screen status indicators with real time 

• Upper-lower case ASCII with ALL control codes 

• 45 f 50, 57, 74, 100 baud Baudot 

• 110, 150, 300, 600, 1200, 1800, 2400, 4800, and 9600 baud 
ASCII - full or half duplex 

• 1 to 175 wpm send and receive Morse code 

• Current loop or RS232 I/O interface 

• ST6000 has tuning oscilloscope and loop supply 

• Three RTTY shifts: 170, 425, or 850 Hz 

• Multiple active RTTY filters and detector stages 

• Crystal controlled RTTY transmit tones 

• Printers available for hard-copy of all 3 codes 

Write or call for more details. See the DS310G, MSO3100, ST6000, and printers at your favorite 
HAL dealer. 



HiL 



HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORP. 



345 



BOX 365 

URBANA, ILLINOIS 61801 



217-367-7373 



J* -4 

Z O 

H 
m 




PI 

33 



F/g. 4, Receiver rf schematic. 
16 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



don't suggest pushing the IC 
harder by raising the value 
of R40. You don't need the 
extra gain and accompany- 
ing headache. 

The faithful 40673 
MOSFFT is again in service 
as a product detector at Q9. 
Notice the heavy audio by- 
passing and decoupling. 

Receiver Af Section 

Refer to Fig. 5. An LF353 
dual op amp (IC3) is used as 
the receiver low-level audio 
amplifier. R47 allows the au- 
dio gain to be trimmed out 
to suit. C50 and €51 help roll 

off the high-frequency re- 
sponse of the audio section. 
The LM383 audio power am- 
plifier, IC5 r is somewhat of a 
power overkill, but it pro- 
vides low-distortion audio at 
normal listening levels- 
much better than trying to 
push an underrated audio 
section too hard. 

IC4 is another LF353, this 
time used as an age amplifi- 
er and detector. I seem to 
get the best results with au- 
dio-derived age when the 
base audio frequencies are 
rolled off — which explains 
the small value of C54. R57 
controls the age attack time 
and R58 controls the release 
time. Of course, changing 
C58 messes up both time 
constants, Age characteris- 
tics are quite subjective, so 
feel free to experiment here. 
You might consider age 
something of a luxury on a 
basic transceiver. On 20 
meters, I don't 

Speech Amp, 

Balanced Modulator, and 

Transmit Mixer 

Fig. 6 details the above- 
mentioned circuitry. Again 
an LF353 is used as a two- 
stage audio amplifier (IC6). 
This time it is rigged to pro- 
vide a high-impedance input 
to the microphone. Since 
high-impedance audio cir- 
cuits make me nervous, I 
heavily decoupled the input 
from rf. A1496N double-bal- 
anced mixer (IC7) is em- 
ployed as the balanced 
modulator and works quite 
well At least 40 dB of car- 



rier suppression is easily ob- 
tained by adjusting R77. No- 
tice the other end of the T/R 
filter switch (CR8) at the 
output of the balanced 
modulator. 

After being routed 
through the crystal filter to 
do away with the lower side- 
band, our 9-MHz SSB signal 
is ready to be translated to 
14 MHz. It was at this point 
that I started learning too 
much about SSB transceiver 
design. I won't bore you 
with all the mixer circuits 
that didn't work. Let me just 
say that I have seen just 
about every picket fence 
display on my spectrum an- 
alyzer that I could imagine 
(see "Poor Man's Spectrum 
Analyzer/' 73, August, 
1982). The biggest problem 
was the 3rd harmonic of the 
vfo at 1 5 MHz. Now you can 
supposedly get this out with 
a carefully designed multi- 
pole bandpass filter, but it 
sort of compromises our sim- 
ple-to-build theme. Fortu- 
nately, there is another way. 

First, start with a 1496N 
double-balanced mixer. 
Next, don't drive the carrier 
port (pin 8) with more than 
70 mV peak-to-peak of vfo 
signal This leaves the mixer 
pretty much in "linear" op- 
eration so that not much 3rd 
harmonic of the vfo appears 
in the mixer output. (Refer 
to the spectrum photo, 
which tells the story.) Any- 
way, we now have a clean 
14-MHz SSB signal, so on to 
the transmit amp chain. 

Transmit Amplifier Chain 

Referring to Fig, 7, we find 
the transmit amplifier chain 
uses both tuned and broad- 
band stages. Q11 and Q12 
are tuned low-level amplifi- 
er stages, There is more po- 
tential gain in these stages 
than needed, so the turns 
ratio at L9 is not for imped- 
ance matching, it's to 
"throw away" some extra 
gain without towering Q. 
The turns ratio at L10 pro- 
vides a suitable match be- 
tween the drain of Q11 and 
the 30-Ohm or so input im- 







MO 



WBmBBS 



105BAS 



MAX. MECHANICAL INTEGRITY, 

ELECTRICAL PERFORMANCE, 

SPACE SAVINGS AND SELECTION 




3-Elemerrt Monoba riders also available. 

Optional BN-66 balun recommended foe above antennas 



Tillable Aluminum Boom-to-Wast Brar-ket 



Remove 
Beits 




arid Tilt 



MECHANICALLY Hy-Gain monobandantennas 
employ the best materials available and are 
fabricated with accurate tooling for an integral 
balance seal! parts worktogether For example, 
ourelement-toTnasl brackets are the best in the 
industry and our tiftable mast-to-boom damps 
are unique Stainless steel hardware is chemi- 
cally passivated to eliminate rust All tubing and 
parts are deburred and finished so you don't 
have to re-manufacture the antenna before in- 
stallation. It aM adds up to antennas with maxi- 
mum mechanical integritythat withstand 80 mph 
[129 km/h) wlndloads and radial ice. 



ELECTRICAL performance is not based on 
theoretical calculations alone but is tuned and 
tested for optimum results on our government 
approved test range. Hy-Gain's factory tuned 
52 ohm Beta Match is exclusive and assures 
positive dc ground for lightning protection and 
reduced precipitation static. Though sometimes 
unconventional^ our meticulous element 
spacing assures maximum F/B ratio and un- 
compromising power gain VSWR at resonance 
is less than 1.5:1. All Hy-Gain monobanders 
handle maximum legal power, in short, elec- 
trical performance is at maximum by design 
and requires no re-tuning. 



SPACE problems are virtually eliminated. Even our iargest mono- 
band antennas fit most residential lots. And thanks to Hy-Gains 
careful materials selection and superb mechanical engineering, 
the weight and windload of antennas is at an absolute minimum to 
permit stacking on conventional heavy duty towers and rotators. 
This gives you maximum DX performance even with limited space. 

MONOBAND BEAMS 



402BAS 



204BA5 



20 m 




ooooQHigtiCW 

CW 

Low Phone 

High Phone 



402 BAS 

"IE * 



40 m 




-■m liM ■■!•"■ i+'i* us* *-iJ"ii nit " " 

205BAS 20 m 155BAS 



15 m 



■ in r -t t0 r it 1 1 

105BAS 



10 m 



X 



1^^— 



-7* 






m 



"Ncv 



^J5c; 



m 



i 



t =—^ 



;t 



^ 


I — 

— H- 


-*— 
-+— - 

P 






■* 


■ 

I 

1 1 


"-- -. t 


££ 




fe 


*^ 








-MM MM Hit l* I* M 2* MIS m to li « 3 1 a 111 jiy til til li J 11* 



j+ » » !? n w 



m hh i*n *n* »»* 



Hy-Gain Monobander Antennas Maximus 
at Better Amateur Dealers 



204BAS 




ny-gain 



TELEX COMMUNICATIONS, INC. 

9600 Aldntfi Ave. So., MinneapclFS. MN 55420 U.S. A. 
Europe. Le Bonaparte- Office 7n, Centre Affaires Pans^Nord. 93^53 La Blanc-MesniE, France. 




See List of Advertisers on page 114 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 17 



C48 

l<VF 

DETECTOR * 42 



TO 

SHAKER 

4-8il 




* CR6 1 J+C5B 

\ ? , R56I < UF 

/^ l ' 5.6M 25V 



/^ ^7 LOW LEAKAGE 



pedance of the driver. The 
driver is the broadband 
stage. The same feedback 
that sets the broadband ing 
on this stage pretty much en- 
sures low -frequency stabili- 
ty, which is what 1 was after. 
It seems a little hard to find 
a suitable driver for HF 
work, but the 2IM3866, which 
often is used in cable TV sys- 
tems, is very easy to find. 
Since it is a VHF transistor, 



Fig. 5. Receiver af schematic. 

feedback for the sake of sta- 
bility seems prudent in an 
HF driver application. 

L12 matches the output 
of the driver to the 5-Ohm or 
so input impedance of the fi- 
nal amplifier, A single pi net- 
work of rather low Q trans- 
forms the assumed 5(K3hm 
antenna impedance to 
around 35 Ohms, setting up 
the 1 .5-W output with some 
room to spare. L16 and C108 



form a series-resonant trap 
that takes care of the 2nd 
harmonic, which is the only 
offending spur. Notice that 
the bias to both the driver 
and the final amplifier are 
switched by +T. Despite 
some deliberate and unde- 
liberate attempts, I've not 
managed to zing the final 
(probably because I have a 
spare). Harmonic suppres- 
sion appears to be fairly in- 



sensitive to antenna imped- 
ance, which is characteristic 
of series trap suppression. 
R99 allows you to adjust the 
overall gain of the amplifier 
chain. 

Mini'ceiver Construction 

I feel that you will have a 
good chance of successfully 
building the mini'ceiver, or 
your customized version of 
it, if you are comfortable us- 
ing a triggered oscilloscope 
in troubleshooting and have 
built several kits and scratch- 
built projects. Or, of 
course, if you can get help 
from a friend and/or some- 
one in your club or repeater 
group with the above ex- 
perience. I'm not trying to 
discourage anyone; I just 
want you to have a good 
chance for success if you 
embark on the project 
Building and experimenting 
is great fun, and I want it to 
stay thai way for you I 
believe that you can build 
mini'ceiver for about $200, 
maybe less if you have a big 
junk box. 

Parts 

See below for the list- 



Parts List 



Component 

4093BE 

1350P 

1496N 

LF353 

LM383 

TIP125 

2N2222 

MPF102 

40673 

2 N 3866 

MRF476 

1N914B 

1 N4001 

8.998500 MHz 

8.999250 MHz 

9.000750 MHz 

L43-2 

L43-6 

FT-37-43 

FT-50-61 

T-50-6 

3-30 pF 

3-30 pF 

80-300 

4-40 

5% NPO 

10% TS 



IC 
IC 

IC 
IC 

IC 

DBJT 

BJT 

JFET 

MOSFET 

BJT 

BJT 

Diode 

Diode 

,001 % SR crystal 

.001% SR crystal 

.001% SR crystal 

Coll form 

Coil form 

Toroid 

Toroid 

Toroid 

Van cap., 1 /*" shaft 

Var cap., PC mount 

Arco trimmer 

Arco trimmer 

Ceramic cap 

Ceramic cap 



Ref# 

IC1 

IC2 

IC7^8 

IC3-4 f 6 

1 05 

Q1 -2 

03-4,7 

Q5 

06,8-10 

Q12 

Q13 

CR 1-8,10 

CR9 

Y1 

Y2,5 

Y3-4 

L2,5-7 

L4,8-1Q 

L6 

L11 

L14-16 

C9 

C6 

C114 

C108 

C7-B,10 

C20,30,34 

43,7677 

88 t 91 



Supplied 

4 
2,4,6,7,8 

4 

2,4,7 
2,4,7 
2 ; 4,7 

2,4,6,7,8 

2,4,6,8 

1 ,2,4 T 6,7 t 8 

2,7,8 

8 

2,4,6,7,8 

2,4,6,7,8 

5 

5 

5 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

6 

6 

8 

8 

Local TV supply 

Local TV supply 

or use silver 

mica 5% 



5% SM 
500 pF 

1 uF 

CU-3000A 

CU-3011A 



Silver mica cap 

Feedthrough cap, 
threaded type 
Low-leak cap 
Bud minibox 
Bud minibox 



C21,22 2,4,8 

C105-107 
C15,17 1 



C58 



7 
2 
2 



Note: Other components are garden variety Va- and Vz-W resistors, 
+ 80,-10% 50- V ceramic capacitors, and standard electrolytic 
capacitors. 



Suppliers: 

1. Alaska Microwave Labs, 4335 E 5th Street, Anchorage AK 99504; 

(907)-338-0340. 

Z Allied Electronics, 401 E 8th Street, Fort Worth TX 76102; 

(817)-336-5401. 

3. Amidon Associates, 12033 Otsego Street, N. Hollywood CA91607; 
(2 13}- 760-4429. 

4. Jameco Electronics, 1355 Shoreway Road, Belmont CA 94002; 
{415J-592-8097. 

5. Jan Crystals, 2400 Crystal Drive, Fort Meyers FL 33906; 
(813)-936-2397. 

6. RadioKit T Box 41 1S, Greenville NH 03048; (603)-878-1033, 

7. Radio Shack. 

8. Semiconductors Surplus, 2822 N 32nd Street #1 f Phoenix AZ 
85008; (602)-956-9423, 



18 73 Magazine • January, 1983 





DRAKE 



ESR-24 Satellite TV Receiver 



* All 24 Satellite Channels • Attractive Styling • Digital Display • UP/Down Channel Button Control • Fixed and Variable 
Audio Tunmgfor all Subcarriers« Normal/Inverted Video Switching»Signal andTuningMeters^Singleand Double Down 
Conversion Models • AFC for drift-free operation • Remote Control and Remote Metering Options 

Satellite TV System - AES Package Dco£ 

Includes: • Wilson MD-11B Antenna with Polar Mount • Drake ESR-24 
Satellite Receiver w/Down Converter #120° LNA •Scaler Feed «LN A Rotor 

h ■■ « CI flQROO For Details - Call Paul Wittkamp, WA9TFG 

All for O I OOJ at our Milwaukee TVRO Headquarters 

Options: RF Modulator - $59 95 ; Splash Proof Box - $24 95 ; 100° LNA - $60 00 extra; Cables 




liirm 

Paul Wittkamp 
WA9TFG 



Microwave Satellite 
TV Antenna 



WILSON 

MICROWAVE 

SYSTEMS.IiMC. ■—---—————-——»-- 
Model MD-11B New, improved IT parabolic polar mounted antenna, the 
perfect companion for the DRAKE ESR-24 receiver. Includes a polar mount 
which is simple to install utilizing a single pedestal, rotatable base. Anchor 
bolts are simply set into pestholes & concrete; professional concrete work & 
leveling are not necessary. Two men can install antenna in 3 hours after 
concrete hardens. Works well in any location in the U.S. Adjustable declination 
angle sweeps trye for all parts of the country; azimuth crank is interchangea- 
ble for either East or West coast locations. Shipped F.O.B. 

MD-11B Specifications: Milwaukee, Wl or 
ANTENNA 



Diameter 11' or 3.35m 

Construction .... 12 panels, IS ga. steel 

Finish ,.Tan h zinc primer 

Weight ;£.>.* 225 pounds 

Wind -operational... 50 mph steady load 
Survival .*.. 100 mph steady load 

Temperature range -60 to +125° 

Frequency * 3.7 to 4.2 GHz 

VSWR .,, 125 or less 

UP III 4 * + + + + 4. jt+.LEt.iLLtB-a-MJL.BB.aaa "A \A U 

r / u no Liu ■******* + + + + + + f-p-p h*j 

1/2 power beamwidth 1.5° 



MOUNT Las Vegas - NV 

Type True polar, rotatable base 

Construction 1/4" - 3/8" steel 

Weight... 300 pounds 

Finish.... .... Brown 

Foundation 4 holes 6" * 4' 

Azimuth Sweep .**.. 91° 

Elevation „ 66* 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Total shipping weight 660 pounds 

Installation Time 2 men, 3 hours 

Warranty j^,,;, 6 months 




Order Toll Free: 1-800-558-0411 



in Wisconsin (outside Milwaukee Metro Area) 

1-B00-242-B195 



;{iKIL*iiJJJI 



Inc. 



4828 W. Fond du Lac Avenue; Milwaukee, WI 53216 - Phone (414) 442-4200 



AES BRANCH STORES 



WICKLIFFE, Ohio 44092 

28340 Euclid Avenue 

Phone (216) 585-7388 

Ohio WATS 1-800-362-0290 

W* 1-800-321-3594 



ORLANDO, Fla, 32803 

621 Commonwealth Ave, 

Phone (305) 894 3238 

Fla. WATS 1-800 432-9424 

S 1-800-327^1917 



LAS VEGAS, Nev. 89106 

1072 N. Rancho Drive 

Phone (702) 647-3 U4 

m In-Stale WATS 

82f 1-800-634-622? 



Call Paul Wittkamp at AES Milwaukee 

Toll Free • 1 -800-558-041 1 

for all Satellite TV information 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 19 



» TP 2. 

£-^ - 
- H n 

o > 





Photo D, Vfo construction detail. 



Fig, 6. Speech-amp, balanced-modulator, and trammit-mixer 
schematic. 

20 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



irtg of all major parts. As I 
promised, the parts are read- 
ily available. You might 
have a little trouble finding 
the NPO capacitors, but 
many radio-TV parts houses 
stock them. Keep in mind 
that one of your best 
sources for parts informa- 
tion is just a CQ or two 
away — just don't conduct 
your purchases directly on 
the air! 

Chassis 

I built my mini'ceiver in a 

12" L X 7" W X 4" H Bud 

CU-3011A minibox, and 

usedtwo2*i"L x 2-1/8" W 

X 1-5/8" H Bud CU-3000A 

miniboxes within to house 
the vfo and bfo. As you can 
see in the construction pho- 
tos, I put the power supply, 
receiver, speech amp, bal- 
anced modulator, and trans- 
mitter mixer on a main 
board and the transmit amp 
chain on a smaller piggy- 
back board. This worked out 
successfully. However, I 
plan to use two cards of the 
same size mounted vertical- 
ly, each facing out, in the 
next mini'ceiver. In this 
case, I would put most of 
the transmitter circuitry on 
one card. If you decide on 
this layout keep the speech 
amplifier and final rf amp at 
opposite ends of the trans- 
mitter board! 

Circuit Boards 

The layout of high-gain rf 



is 



and audio PC boards 
something of an art 
For a one-shot project, it's 
hard to beat the use of sin- 
gle-sided (2-ounce copper) 
circuit board with the cop- 
per on the component side 
used as a ground plane. No- 
tice that the transmit ampli- 
fier chain is built in this way. 
It's generally faster to dupli- 
cate a circuit using this ap- 
proach than to go through 
the process of lifting circuit 
board art, exposing resist, 
etching, etc. 

I've outlined the ap- 
proach I like to use in an ear- 
lier article, but it's worth go- 
ing through again. If nothing 
else, it makes component 
substitutions a snap. Get 
some drafting vellum with a 
light blue 1/1 Oth-inch grid on 
it. After you have gathered 
all the parts for a circuit, 
you can begin developing 
the board layout. Start by 
mulling over the schematic 
and inspecting the compo- 
nents. Then lay out the com- 
ponents on the grid paper 
and think through their in- 
terconnection, juggle the 
components around as 
needed for a neat arrange- 
ment that minimizes trace 
lengths and crossovers. If 
you think in terms of circuit 
strips, it makes things easier. 

After you have the layout 
and interconnection for a 
section of the circuit visual- 
ized, pick up the compo- 
nents and sketch in their 




Photo £ . View of the main hoard which includes the receiver, 
speech amp, balanced modulator, and transmit mixer. 



Rf Coils and Transformers 

Radio Shack currently 
markets a packet of magnet 
wire in three gauges: part 
number 278-1345, This type 
of wire can be stripped sim- 
ply with hot solder, so it's 
ideal for rf coil and trans- 
former applications, Use the 
30-gauge wire for winding at! 
the shielded transformers. 
Use the 22-gauge wire 
for winding all the toroids 
except L6 and L14, where 
the 26-gauge wire will be 
easier to use. I used a small 
10-uH molded choke for 
L13. However, this should 
not be too critical. If you 
have trouble finding a mold- 
ed choke, try 16 turns or so 
on an FT-50 61 ferrite core. It 
might be a good idea to put 
a 10-Ohm resistor in series 
with this choke to avoid any 
surprise resonances. 

You will notice a number 
of bifilar windings are used. 
I use an electric drill to pre- 
twist pairs of wires to about 
6-8 turns per inch. Use an 
ohmmeter to figure out 
which wire is which after 
winding the bifilar coils. On 
the shielded coils, bring the 
bifilar pairs out together at 
each end of the bifilar wind- 
ing and then separate and 
tin them under the circuit 
board. Don't try to solder di- 
rectly to the coil-form posts 
on these transformers. You' 
wind up a post short. 



outlines on the vellum. 
Show the component inter- 
connections underneath the 
circuit board with dotted 
lines. You will be surprised 
how fast this goes. Remem- 
ber that all ground connec- 
tions are on top. Be careful 
to keep input and output 
connections of high-gain rf 
and audio stages separated. 

Once the layout is com- 
plete, you can tape it direct- 
ly to your circuit board 
blank. Drill through the lay- 
out and the circuit board 
each place a component 
lead or wire goes through 
the board. I use about a #62 
bit for most holes except IC 
leads, where I use a #68 bit. 
It's easy to enlarge holes 
tater as needed for the big- 
ger component leads. 

After all the holes are 
drilled, lightly countersink 
them with a 3/32" bit— ex- 
cept those which are going 
to be direct ground con- 
nections. The countersink- 
ing keeps the leads from 
shorting out on the ground 
plane. After cleaning the 
board and perhaps tin-plat- 
ing it, you can begin instal- 
ling components. They are 
interconnected under the 
board by their leads and/or 
bus wire, Remember to keep 
connections as short as pos- 
sible and watch input-out- 
put routing around high-gain 
stages. 



* — i 




<: 

in 



x a. 



Fig. 7. Transmit-amplifier chain. 

73 Magazine • January, 1983 21 



^^m 




Photo F. Top view of the transmit amplifier chain. Note the 
"stovepipe" driver heat Sink. 




Photo C. Overall view of the mini'ceiver circuitry with the 
transmit amplifier card in place. The bio is housed in the 
small minibo* in the hack 



You may find the vfo and 
bio a little tight to construct 
since they have to fit in their 
respective miniboxes With 
a little patience everything 
will fit For the vfo, it's prob- 
ably best to etch the copper 
off the circuit board except 
around the edges- Hopeful 
ly, the vfo detail photo will 
help with the layout. 

Heat Sinks 

The audio power amplifi- 
er, transmit final amplifier, 
and transmit driver should 
all have heat sinks, I made a 
"stovepipe" heat sink out of 
copper sheet for the 2NA& 
driver. Standard commer- 
cial heat sinks were used 
elsewhere. 

Tune-Up 

Recommended test equip 
ment for tuning up mini" 

ceiver includes a triggered 
oscilloscope with at least a 
20-MHz bandwidth, a multi- 
band HF transceiver, a dum- 
my load, a frequency count- 
er, and an audio oscillator 
Luxury items for tune-up in- 
clude a grid-dip oscillator, 
an rf signal generator with a 
step attenuator, a two-tone 
oscillator, and, of course, a 
spectrum analyzer 

Power Supply and 
T/R Voltages 

You can run a mini'ceiver 
off a 12-V-dc, 1 -A supply Be- 

22 73 Magazine * January. 1983 



fore powering up the rest of 
the circuitry, test the T/R 
voltage switch for proper ac- 
tion. Check the collectors ot 
Q1 and Q2 in each PTT 
switch position for proper 
on/off action You did wire 
the microphone jack up 
right, didn't you? 

Bfo and Vfo Tune-Up 

Apply +12 V dc to the 
vfo and (heck for oscillation 
with the scope at C16. Fully 
mesh tuning capacitor C9 
and adjust C6 for operation 
around 5.250 MH/. Unmesh 
C9 and confirm operation at 
about 5.300 MHz. Set C9 
about mid-range and peak 
L2 while looking at the vfo 
output. Then adjust R18. 
t lockwise from the bottom, 
for a 5-V peak-to-peak out- 
put. Putting the top on the 
vfo will change its operating 
frequency somewhat, so 
you may want to tune and 
try a couple of times until 
you get it on frequency with 
the top on 

Apply +12 V dc to the 
bfo and back the slug nearly 
out uf L3, While monitoring 
the output of L3 with the 
scope, slowly run the tuning 
slug in until oscillation 
starts. Peak the oscillator 
output You should get 
about a 5-V peak-to-peak 
output Check oscillation 
frequency with your counter 



and fine-tune the slug in L3 
for operation at 8.998500 

MHz The bfo must be load- 
ed with the product detec- 
tor and balanced modulator 
for proper operation It's a 
good idea to put a small 
hole in the top of the bfo 
mini box over L3 to allow for 
touch-up adjustment of the 
slug with the minibox top 
in place. 

Receiver Tune-Up 

Run the tuning slugs in on 
L4, L5, and Lb so that th<> 
tops of the slugs are just 
slightly above the top of the 
shield cans. Set the volume 
control and K47 at mid- 
range You should now be 
able to hear 20-meter SSB 
signals on your antenna or 
on a 15' piece of wire stuck 
in the antenna jack 

Fire up your other HF rig 

into a dummy load at low 
output power and set its out- 
put frequency for about 
14.275 MHz. Tune the 
mini'ceiver to find the sig- 
nal. Once found, monitor 
pin 7 on IC4(the age output) 
and peak L4, L5 r and Lb for 
maximum age output It you 
see the age voltage peaking 
above 6 V dc during tuning, 
reduce your signal level a 
bit. You can now adjust R47 
i suit Back this pot down a 
bit if you run into high- 
volume audio distortion or 



instability when running off 
dry cells. 

Transmitter Tune-Up 

Hook mini'ceiver to a 
MOhm dummy load Short 
the PTT input on the mike 
lack to ground Check the 
voltage across R115 It 
should be around 20 mV dc, 
which indicates *i 20-mA qui- 
escent bias on Ql 1 If it's 
much off this value, replace 
R112 with a larger or smaller 
resistor as needed to bring 
the bias in range. Incidental- 
ly, if you have trouble find- 
ing a 1-Ohm resistor for 
R115, you can use a 10-Ohm 
resistor (200 mV dc) r but 
short the resistor out after 
setting up the bias 

input a single audio tone 
of about 8 mV peak-to-peak 
into the audio side of the 
mike jack Adjust R70 for a 
1.5-V peak-to-peak audio 
signal at pin 1 of IC7 Hook 
the scope to the anode of 
CR8 and peak L7 You will 
see a waveform that looks 
like an AM signal with 20 
40% modulation, about 400 
mV peak-to-peak Check pin 
1 of IC8 for a fairly clean 
150-200-mV CW signal Look 
at the output of L8 and peak 
for a 14-MHz signal of about 
150-200 mV. Move the 
scope to the output of L10 
and peak L9, L10, and R99 
Adjust R99 for a lower bias 



voltage to Q10 and Q11 if 

the output of L10 is more 
than 500 mV peak-topeak 
Check the output of Q12 at 
C59 for about a 5-V pea Mo- 
peak signal, 

Hook the scope to the 
output of the amplifier 
chain ISG-239 connecter] 
and peak C114. This is broad 
tuning, so watch carefully 
You should have about 25 V 
peak-to-peak of rf output 
hind the 2nd harmonic of 
mini'ceiver's output on 10 
meters and tune CI 08 for a 
null. Tuning is quite sharp, 
so tune carefully. C108 can 
also be tuned to peak the 
2nd harmomic; be sure you 
tune for minimum output on 
10 meters You can use a 
short piece of wire for a 
receive antenna on you r 
10-meter rig since it's in the 
same room with mini'ceiver. 

Disconnect the jumper 
and audio oscillator from 
the microphone jack and 
plug in the mike. Readjust 
R70 a bit if needed, for an 



SSB voice signal similar to 
the one in Photo B Be 
careful not to push too hard; 
there is enough flat-topping 

out thert* already. 

Operation 

Now the moment of truth 
The results you get with mini' 
ceiver depend heavily on 
your antenna system, but 
this is true of any station I 
think you will be surprised, 
I've gotten clean audio re- 
ports (except when I tried a 
narrower crystal filter!) and 
moderate signal strength re- 
ports which is expected for 
QRP The fact that mini' 
ceiver is home-brewed does 
generate QSO interest 

Mods and Alternative 
Circuitry 

An S-/rfoutput meter can 

be added easily if you like to 
watch meters jiggle For the 
S-meter, monitor the age 
voltage which will vary from 
about 4 to 7 V. Add a 2:1 re- 
sistive divider across the rf 



output (about Ik total load) 
and then detect the peak rf 
voltage at the divider output 
with a diode-capacitor rf de- 
tector This should give you 
about 6 V peak to drive the 
meter. Use a toggle switch 
to switch modes on the 
meter. 

There is enough room left 
to add an "afterburner" if 
you feel you need a little 
more power. I suggest using 
an MRF477, which should 
take you easily into the 
25-W range. No more lan- 
tern battery operation, 
though. The receiver anten- 
na switch should be moved 
to the collector side of the 
matching network in this 
case I don't suggest this un- 
less you have already done 
some rf amplifier design. 

Mini'ceiver should be fair- 
ly easy to put on other HF 
bands by adding the appro- 
priate crystal oscillator and 
another 1496 mixer to 
achieve a suitable vfo out- 
put range, along with adjust- 



ing L and C values as 

needed. 

From Here 

You can never really fin- 
ish an electronic design (or a 
computer program for that 
matter] and mini'ceiver is no 
exception. There are many 
ways the design can be im- 
proved. If you have an idea, 
try it! Experimenting is fun 
If you would like to ask me a 
question about mini'ceiver, 
please send an SASE. 73! ■ 

References and Readings 

1 + "Progressive GommunJea- 
tions Receiver/' Wes Hayward 
and John Lawson, QST r Novem- 
ber, 1981. 

2. Solid State Design for the 
Radio Amateur, Wes Hayward 
and Doug DeMaw, ARRL publi- 
cation* 

3. Crystal Oscillator Design and 
Temperature Compensation, 
Marvin Frerking, Van Nostrand 
Reinhold. 

4. Introduction to Radio Fre- 
quency Design, Wes Hayward, 
Prentice-Hall. (Excellent if you 
can handle higher math) 



*##***#######*##**•*###*+***##******#*#*#**************#•**+#**####••**#*#*# ******* 



2300 MHz VARIABLE D O W N C O N V E R T E R 



********************************************* 

I 

K 



ANTENNA KIT 





& WASHERS 
31 SPACERS 
MOUNTING BRACKET 
6" RG 174 COAX 
'F CONNECTOR • 35" ROD 
6W* x 4" P.V.C, PIPE 
2 DRILLED END CAPS • HARDWARE 



POWER SUPPLY 

KIT 
$1 



T 





POWER TRANSFORMER 
COURSE TUNE POT. 
FINE TUNE POT, 
3 J P CONNECTORS 
RESISTORS & CAPS 
LED WITH HOLDER 
TERMINAL STRIP 



PC. BOARD 

RF CHOKE 

KNOB 

WIRE 

2 SWITCHES 

4 DIODES 

LM 317 REG. 



WOOD GRAIN CABINET WITH SILK 
SCREENED front and back $10.95 Extra 

BUILT POWER SUPPLY „., $34.95 



Complete 

Down Converter 

System 

includes 

antenna kit 

power sufp1y kit 

converter kit 

SPECIAL $4995 



QUANTITY 

DISCOUNTS 

Any Price in Adv. 

10 pes. 12% oM 

25 pci. 18% off 

50 pes. 25% oil 

I DO pes. 30% aft 

1000 pes 35% off 

No Wining for 
Quantity Discount 



********** **#**#*■ 

PARTS 



Converter P.C T Board 
Plated through holes 
for stability $4.95 

Power Supply 

r*w* D 03 TO x-HD 

MHr yUl i rfflr 

2835 Diodes 95 

.001 Chip 

Choke Set of 4 1.95 

LM 317 Regulator 1.25 
"P Connectors 

Chassis 50 

Wall Transformer 

12 VAC 700 MA....495 

V Bolt ... 95 

BALUN 

75 to 300 ohm 1.95 

BALUN 

for rabbit ears.. ..2*95 
* RG 59/ U COAX 

WITH CONNECTORS 
FACTORY MADE 

100 Ft 117.50 

50 Ft. 9.50 

25 Ft. 5.75 

3 Ft. 2.50 



********** ******* *^+* 

CONVERTER 



/ ^-1 



KIT 




P.C. BOARD PRE-DRILLED 
SOLDER PLATED WITH 
PLATED THROUGH HOLES 
FOR A MORE STABLE PIC- 
TURE, M£TU-> n 

2 HP 2835 Diodes 

6 .001 Chip Caps. 

9 Resistors 

4 Prewound chokes 

1 Electrolytic Cap. 

1 Pre Made Probe 



* WIRED PX, BOARD TEST- 
ED, READY TO CONNECT TO 
CAN WITH PROBE & CABLE 
CONNECTOR ATTACHED. 
J24J5 



We will tune conver- 
ter board for $12.50 

trouble shoot 
add .*««- — 7.50 

trouble shoot 
power supply. $12.50 



plus any parts needed 



We will accept telephone ordara For Visa & Mastercard 

No CO D. Ord«fS 

TO ORDER CALL JEJUISS 

Complete kit weighs 10 lbs. Please add sufficient postage 

6254 La Pas Trail 

Indianapolis, Indiana 46268 



ELECTROniC 
RAinBOW 8 



**See Ust of Advertisers on page 1 \4 



73 Magaime • January, 1983 23 



An Alarming Procedure 

This false-proof repeater emergency alert 
won't tie up expensive equipment 




Metvyn C. Morris WA U.Ct 
Michaet Poiimer K1FNX 
No Hampton Road 
Sharon MA 02067 



Decoder board mounted in battery compartment 



w 



«F 
AMP 



Mi* 
l-F 
AMP 



l^'Hl 



l-F 

Uif 



0T5CR 



Qi 



QZ 



KEG 5V 



POWER 



I 



05,6.7 



MtfLT 



■030 Ht 
FILTER 

ay- 



ALARM 
DSC 



09 



09. 10 



rv 



OO 



01.4 




4LEHT 



ALFDCG 
AMP 



VOLUME 
COWTftOL 



WC, 



0l£. 13 J* 



X 



/ft 



osc 

BIAS 



F/g. 7. Block diagram. 



24 73 Magazine • January. 1983 



Two-meter repeaters pro- 
vide reliable communi- 
cation for relatively large 
areas surrounding the re- 
peater site. There has long 
been a need for a reliable 
warning or alert system op- 
erating through a repeater 
for civil defense, RACES, 
emergency, and similar type 
requirements. In particular, 
if this need is required in the 
specific area within the lo- 
cale of a repeater, then the 
approach described here- 



win prove more than 
satisfactory. 

On the assumption that a 
secure alert signal must be 
coded in some way, it be- 
comes readily apparent that 
the receiver/decoder must 
be immune (Le,, secure) 
from false triggering. The 
problems associated with 
using a repeater manifest 
themselves through the 
types of signals transmitted 
For example: engine whine, 
noise, voice characteristics, 
whistling, and other distor- 
tions contained in speech 
must not falsely trigger the 
alarm mechanism. The re- 
ceiver, therefore, must be of 
sufficient sensitivity to oper- 
ate within a given signal- 
strength area and contain a 
decoder. The repeater must 
be able to pass the coded 
signal with sufficient ampli- 
tude to activate the alarm 
mechanism. 

Additional requirements 
are that any operator can 
initiate the alarm without 
the necessity of a special 
code generator and that ex- 
isting 2-meter receivers not 
be pressed into service to 
monitor and decode the 
alarm signals. (A previously 
published article out of Can- 
ada described the use of a 
2-meter transceiver with a 
"listening" decoder placed 
in front of the speaker to re- 
ceive and decode the alarm 
signal. Not only does this tie 
up a piece of very expensive 
equipment — but also it im- 
plies that the user must 
listen to every QSO and not 
forget to turn up the au- 
dio volume.) Finally, and 
above all, the receiver and 
code generator must be 
inexpensive. 

With the rudimentary 
specifications as set forth 
above, a search was con- 
ducted into readily avail- 
able equipment that could 
be modified for the task. Af- 
ter some deliberation it was 
decided that a crystal-con- 
trolled FM weather radio of 
the type used by mariners 
for monitoring NOAA 




Fig. 2. Schematic diagram of unmodified Weatheradio, 

73 Magazine • January, 1983 25 



« 



weather broadcasts that al- 
so contains the built-in de- 
coder for NOAA-broadeast 
weather alerts would be 
ideal. The Radio Shack 
Weatheradio Alert (cata- 
logue #1 2-1 54] was selected 
and was used as the basis for 
design. 

In the event of a weather 
emergency, NOAA trans 
mits a tone (1050 Hz) which 
activates an alarm in the re- 
ceiver which in turn alerts 
the listener to activate the 



audio portion of the receiver 
and listen to the detailed 
weather info. (Most weath- 
er-alert receivers allow the 
user to deactivate the audio 
while still keeping the re- 
ceiver in the monitor mode.) 
Normally transmitted 
speech does not activate the 
system since a relatively 
long transmit time {seconds) 
is required of the coding sig- 
nal and it is believed that 
NOAA also "notches out" 
1050 Hz during non-coded 
transmissions. 




1 00* 

Rft3 
., 47K 5 IK 



PHQM 

DISCRIMINATOR V- •— ) 

OUTPUT 






4 TO 5V 



ED 



I W i 1 1 -J_ 



fn /7T ft* 



WS* * W « 

* X X 4 X 



QA 



TO COLLECTOR 
09 



E-2 



TO IV 



4 7*F 



RSI 

I OK TD 

*-vwi — > OSC1 L L ATOH 



567 



RB2 
Z0K 



0,1 



ffr st? 



I00K 

RS3 

47K 



r 



/T7 



® 



jt 
LED 



5 IK /k*\ 

47 H F 



qe 

I2N3905 



TO COLLECTOR 
QIC 



2Z 



J 



->T0 GROUND 



Fig. 3. Decoder subassembly schematic. 



Before describing the 
modifications and design 
philosophy of our alert re- 
ceiver, a cursory look at a 
simplified block diagram of 
the unmodified weather ra- 
dio is necessary (Fig. 1). 

The incoming rf is sup- 
plied [via a link to the ac 
power cord) to an rf amplifi- 
er. A crystal-controlled LO 
drives a diode multiplier and 
is loosely coupled to the in- 
put of a mixer stage. The 
output of the mixer (455 
kHz) drives a tuned if ampli- 
fier and discriminator which 
provides detected audio to 
the audio preamplifier and 
to the 1050-Hz filter In the 
normal listening (WX) mode 
the audio is boosted through 
the audio amplifier and 
drives the speaker In the 
monitor (or alert) mode the 
alarm oscillator is enabled 
and the output of the vol- 
ume control is disconnected 
from the audio amplifier 
and speaker Reception of a 
1050-Hz tone will trigger the 
oscillator and the signal 
thus produced will be am- 
plified via the audio ampli- 
fier and sound the alert. 
(There are some auxiliary 
features which will be de- 
scribed in the discussion on 
modifications,) 

NOAA broadcasts oper- 
ate on frequencies of 





0£CODEfl 
BOARD 



ft it TO 

— >tOS0Ht 

FtLTER AMo 



5V<- 



}l— I"! 



-w 1 



edCl 



3>i- 



QI5C0MNECT 
FILTER AMP 



B# 



m 



JfJ 



;fc«* i : R » 



sv 



1 



ft 24 



R22 /P*\Q4 

-m — *+** 4"i 



m 




OPTIONAL 
D1SC0KKECT 



fig. 4. Connecting the decoder board to the receiver, 
26 73 Magazine ■ January; 1983 



162.400, 162.475, and 
162.550, This is facilitated in 
the unmodified alarm re- 
ceiver by operating the crys- 
tal padded with either a ca- 
pacitor, an inductor, or 
nothing. A three-position 
switch on the rear of the unit 
is provided for this purpose. 
Since we will be operating 
on a fixed frequency, this is 
an unnecessary feature and 
must be disabled. (We set 
the switch in the "un- 
padded" position and epox- 
ied it in place.) 

The repeater frequency 
we are using is 146.865-MHz 
output. The rf stages must 

be retuned to this frequency 
as well as selecting a new 
crystal which will provide an 
i-f of 455 kHz when operat- 
ing in conjunction with this 
frequency. A crystal fre- 
quency of 16.202 MHz is 
used to generate 455 kHz 
when operating with the 
"central" NOAA frequency 
of 162.475 MHz. Working 
backwards, 162.475 MHz 
-455 kHz = 162.02 MHz. 
It becomes obvious then 
that the multiplier is operat- 
ing at a multiplication fac- 
tor of 1 0. At the repeater op- 
erating frequency of 
146.865, a crystal of (146.865 
-455kHz)/10 = 14.641 MHz 
is required for the LO, (The 
crystal can be purchased 
from: Sentry Mfg. Co., 
Chickasha, Oklahoma: 

#SCM-18, HC-25/Mcase with 
wire leads, 15-pf load J 

With this detenriined and 
the planned use of the 1050- 
Hz coding signal, we set off 
to modify the receiver, First 
we applied a signal at the 
NOAA frequency of 162.475 
MHz FM modulated with 
1050 Hz (3-kHz deviation) 
and measured the output of 
the discriminator at the 
point where the alarm 
would just trigger. We ob- 
served the output of the sig- 
nal generator and used this 
output (in microvolts) as the 
target sensitivity at the re- 
peater frequency On the tri 
al unit this was observed as 
approximately 1 uV. Next 
we replaced the crystal, ob- 



A WORLD AHEAD 
OF THE COMPETITION 



SAMPLE VOLUME DISCOUNT COUPON 

Submit lh» paufM-jf witrt jf tun kHd#r. ■lid/of paymanl. 
mnti mcaiw on* trH-TO polab-matic FECD lof 
•ViluHlon [HJrpdMi il Ih* Z4 Igl title* il.imli ont ptt 
arlfanttfl $9950 



NAME 



TOLL FBe INSIDE CA (SOOJ 3fi2-2563 OUTSIDE CA (800) 421-2533 



1 



COMPANY 
ADDRESS . 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 




PHONE. 



PRODELIN 



SUPER DISH 

THERMO COMPRESSION MOLDED 



50 

D*STR PRICE 



$ 499 

Til* ■OMAN S A- 3000 >■ a THER- 
M0C0MPRES81ON MOLDED 
8«l«lllt« Anttnna ... NO MORE 
QRIEFI FEATURES: • 30 meter 
diameter ■ 8 ml or locking fiberglass 
sections for quick, precise assembly 
■ Unique design ■Hows for superior 
stress resistance to withstand ex- 
treme environmental changes 
NO MORE GRIEF! 



SR-800 RECEIVER 



The Roman S A -8006 Sa lei I its Receiver uses 
advanced technology to provide high quality 
reception at a very affordable price. Features: 

■ 24 channel capability ■ 6 audio channels 

■ tine tuning control ■ AFC ■ Illuminated 
signal strength meter ■ attractive design fits 
any decor, 




7 



ORDER WITH: 
A - 100° Low Noise Converter [LNC1 
B - 1 10° Low Noise Converter (LNC) 
C - Down Converter 



$399 



50 

DIST PRICE 




MODEL LNA-915 
LOW NOISE AMPLIFIER 

110° K OR BETTER 



All BOM AN MICROWAVE AMPLIFIERS are 
100% tested and marked for each guaranteed 
rest parameter before they are released All 
measurements are taken with equipment 
calibrated and maintained in accordance 
witfi military standard MILC-45662, 



OTY, 


OPENACCT 


Pay w Order 


10 UNITS 


•443. a» 


139050 


30 UNITS 


♦421 .«T 


• 379 00 


60 UNITS 


•368.33 


•349*0 


600 UNITS 


Sd6S.ii 


• 329 m 


tOOO UNITS 


1332*77 


$29900 




BOMAN INDUSTRIES 

SATELLITE PRODUCTS DIVISION 
9300 HALL RD-. DOWNEY. CA 90241 
£213) 809-4041 ^ 



U 



The NEW" Polar-matic Ultra Feed 



OO 










Improve your system qualtiy with the 
EFH-75 Microwave Feed. It offers 
precision polarity selection using the 
attractive control shown here. 

INSTALLATION FEATURES: 130 ft. of 3 
conductor wire included -TERMINALS attach 
at each end - NO MORE SPLICING - Molded 
terminal posts on motor cover ■ Painted part 
prevents corrosion - ON-OFF switch on control 
box - Power-on light on control box - All 
necessary hardware included, 



ALL NEW 




DISTRIBUTOR PRICE 



Toll Free Inskte Ca. (600) 352-2553 Outside (800) 421 2133 




TERMINAL STfllP 

TO iN&lttE VEAfl AROUND 

CONWCTION. *NO WCWE SPLICING^ 



PMGHT AkftLF AOAITEH 
niOHf ANOLt L.N A MOUNTING 



served that the LO was oper- 
ating, and proceeded to re- 
time the rf and LO stages, 
Unable to lower the tuned 
frequency adequately by 
squeezing the inductor coils 
closer together, we added 
capacitors in parallel to the 
tank circuits to bring the 
tuning in range of the coils. 
All the while we monitored 
the output of the discrimina- 
tor and tuned for maximum 
output of the 1050-Hz sig- 
nal. With judicious twisting 




and squeezing of the coils 
we were able to match the 
sensitivity observed at the 
NOAA frequency. 

A hastily designed 1050- 
Hz tone generator was im- 
plemented and the receiver 
was put to the test It trig- 
gered obediently in re- 
sponse to the coded sig- 
nal—as well as from alter- 
nator whine and anybody 
who spoke with the right 
quantity of 1050-Hz energy! 
We quickly deduced that 
any decoding scheme that 
was dependent on a single 



frequency was doomed to a 
similar fate. In order to mini* 
mize the cost of the decod- 
ing circuitry, we decided 
against any scheme which 
required timing sequences. 
We also felt that the more 
complicated the scheme, the 
larger (and more costly) the 
decoder would be, and we 
did have space limitations 
within the receiver. 

The solution decided 
upon was to code and de- 
code a single two-tone com- 
posite signal much like that 



TO OICILLITM MAI 

I JUNCTION Hfcl.iM.lH.trBa 



IDL'X 



la nos 



fNiina 




Fig. 5. PC hoard. 



Fig. 6 Component layout If resistors marked with asterisks 
are not used, they must he replaced by jumpers. 



used in the Bell Touch- 
Tone™ system In fact, for 
purposes of simplicity and 
availability, we designed 
around an actual DTMF 
tone pair The 1050-Hz fil- 
ter/amplifier was of no fur- 
ther use; therefore, it was 
bypassed. A small printed- 
circuit board containing the 
two tone decoders and their 
associated drivers was de- 
signed to fit into the backup 
battery compartment, (The 
backup battery would be 
glued to the receiver case 
using double-sided masking 
tapej A detailed description 
of the electrical design and 
receiver modifications fol- 
lows. 

To understand how our 
decoder design developed, 
it is first necessary to under- 
stand the operation of the 
unmodified decoder-alarm 
circuit Transistors Q9 and 
Q10 are operated as a trig- 
gered astable multivibrator 
R22 and R23 keep the pair in 
an untriggered state by 
keeping Q9 off in the ab- 



UNIVERSAL M-600 

MULTI-MODE AND 
CRYPTO-DECODER 




-NEW- 

DECODES: 

TOH-SITOR 
BIT INVERSION 
WEATHER FORMAT 
NONSTANDARD SHIFT 



The M*600 converts these Codes plus RTTY (Baudot & 
ASCII) to video and will drive a Serial or Parallel printer 
for hard copy. Baudot speeds from 60 to 1 32 WPM and 
ASCII from 1 10 to 1200 Baud rates. Morse reception, 
auto range up to 60 WPM. The M-600 has 3 fixed shifts 
and 1 tunable shift. Multiple scroll inhibit and un-shift 
on space are included along with a built-in selMest 
system. Isolated loop MIL- 1 88 or RS232 and optional 
parallel ASCII. 

CONTACT US FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 



Phone: (6 14) 866-4605 
MC & VISA Accepted 



$799.95 
(shipping extra) 



UNIVERSAL ELECTRONICS INC. 
1 280 AIDA DRIVE, REYNOLDSBURG, OHIO 43068 



ALL NEW H.F. 10/160 METER 
SOLID STATE P.LL TRANSCEIVER 




USBLSB 

4 Memories 
3 Way Auto-Scan 
Includes New Bands 
3-Step Tuning Speed 
IF Tune ± 1 KHZ 
Built-in Dual VFO 



CW-WCW N 

200W,PEP(160M-12M> 
100 W. PEPO0M) 
Built-in Power Supply 

AO120VAC 

DC 13.8 V -Ground 

External ALC 

13.5 VDG Relay 



NCG 



JUST SLIGHTLY AHEAD 



1275 N. GROVE ST, 
ANAHEIM, CA 92806 



^31S 



TO ORDER OR 
DLR INFO. CALL 
(714)630-4541 

NOTE- Price. Specifications subject m change 
without notice and obligation 



2S 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



sence of any external bias 
current. When the coded 
1050-Hz signal is received 
and passed through the 
1050-Hz twin-T filter/ampli- 
fier (Q8), it is rectified and 
doubled via D3, D4, and 
EC4, The resulting dc is ap- 
plied to the base of Q9 
through R22 as a trigger cur- 
rent. The multivibrator then 
oscillates. Diode D6 recti- 
fies the oscillator output 
and feeds it back to the in- 
put of Q9, thereby main- 
taining the alarm even after 
the initial trigger signal is re- 
moved. Depending on the 
desired mode of operation 
as an alert receiver, this may 
or may not be a desirable 
feature. This will be dis- 
cussed later. 

The two-tone-decoder de- 
sign is a relatively straight- 
forward adaptation of a 
standard NE567 design. Two 
decoders are connected in 
parallel and drive a pair of 
PNP trigger amps. In order 
to use as much of the exist- 
ing receiver as possible, it 
was decided to disconnect 
the collectors of the multivi- 
brator transistors from the 
supply rail and drive each of 
them from the tone decod- 
ers. In this way the oscillator 
cannot function unless both 
tones are present, thereby 
acting as an AND gate as 
well as an oscillator. The 
PN P trigger amps (Fig, 3) pro- 
vide the necessary inversion 
of the 567 output as well as 
a convenient node to add 
some time delay to the de- 
coding functions. (To pre- 
vent accidental triggering, a 
time delay was added to the 
decoding spec.) 

Referring to Fig. 3, the 
output of either 567 (pin 8) 
goes low when the correct 
tone is presented to its in- 
put. This in turn provides bi- 
as current for the base of the 
PNP (QA or QB), but not un- 
til CAT, B1 is first discharged 
(providing the time delay). 
The LEDs in the emitters of 
the PNPs necessitate that 
the base drop an additional 
two diode drops (in addition 
to VBE) before the PNP can 
turn on again for time delay 

^Se& List of Advertisers on page 1 14 



purposes, (They also add the 
additional feature of illumi- 
nating for test purposes.) 

As mentioned above, 
when both PNPs are on, the 
multivibrator can oscillate. 
Note: Since the 1050-Hz fil- 
ter/amp is disconnected, a 
permanently enabling bias 
voltage is applied to multivi- 
brator transistor Q9 through 
RB1 on the decoder board. 
Potentiometers RA2 and 
RB2 permit tuning the tone 
decoders for the desired fre- 
quency. Refer to Fig. 4 for 
the modified schematic 
showing points of connec- 
tion (and disconnection). 
Figs. 5 and 6 show the PC 
layout and an assembled 
board, respectively. 

Some final comments are 
in order. We decided not to 
depend on rf coupled 
through the power line for 
our input. A banana jack 
was mounted on the case 
and connected to the rf in- 
put through a small capaci- 
tor. An inexpensive %-wave 
antenna was implemented 
using a piece of #10 elec- 
trical wire soldered into a 
banana plug. 

Also, for the needs of the 
Sharon, Massachusetts, Civ- 
il Defense group for whom 
this receiver was designed, 
the latching diode (D6) was 
disconnected. Our philoso- 
phy is that in time of civil 
emergency the intent of gen- 
erating an alarm is to alert 
ava/7a6/e personnel. If with- 
in the vicinity of the receiv- 
er, they will respond by 
switching to the audio mode 
and following the broadcast 
instructions coming over the 
repeater. If they are not 
around or available, latch- 
ing the alarm will not serve 
any useful purpose. This is 
obviously a policy decision 
based on individual need. 

One of the obvious ad- 
vantages of this system is 
that any DTMF tone pair 
can be used, Using # or * has 
the advantage that they are 
not normally used tones in a 
repeater with a phone 
patch. If, however, it is felt 
that using known (and easily 
generated) tones can cause 




The New Standard 
in High Performance 
Repeater Control... 



□ FRIENDLY. POWERFUL, EASY 
TO USE - Human engineered 
to be your 'assistant" at the 
repeater with capability 
second to none. 

D REMOTELY CONFIGURABLE - 
Change command codes, mes- 
sages, tone characteristics, tim 
ing. and more, remotely! 
Reliable storage in E^PROM, 



D Room to grow: BUILT IN! - 
Features intelligent remote con- 
trol and meter readback. Inter- 
laces to synthesized remote 
bases and links. Planned soft- 
ware upgrade path. 

□ SUPPORT -We invented the 
"Computer Controlled Talking 
Repeater/' so we know how to 
provide the applications assis- 
tance, and long term support so 
crucial to a computer based 
product 

□ BRING YOUR REPEATER 
SYSTEM INTO THE 80'S - Start- 
ing at less than $1200! 



Call or write for detailed 
specifications. 

Manual and demonstration 
cassette tapes 
available separately. 



false alarms, then any pair 
can be used simply by de- 
signing simple multivibrator 
oscillators driving speakers 
and holding them against 
the microphone of a trans- 
mitter. Only authorized per- 
sonnel would be issued 
coders. 

The first prototype was 
built using perfboard and 
placed in continuous opera- 
tion in the spring of 1 980, As 
of this writing it has never 
"falsed" yet and continues 
to respond when needed 
upon adequate application 
(several seconds) of the cod- 
ed tone pair. The unit is self- 
tested merely by unplugging 
and replugging the ac power 
by virtue of the momentary- 
charging current to the two 
tirne-delay capacitors, CA1 
and CB1, applied through 
the base-emitter junction of 
the PNP drivers. That, by the 
way, is why the capacitors 
are connected to ground 
and not the supply rail f and 
why resistors RA3 and RB3 



The RC-8S0 
Repeater Controller! 



CICC 



advance^ 

computet 
confroJs 



10816 Northridge Square 
Cupertino. CA 95014 
(408)253-8085 



,^124 



are required (to prevent 
burnout of the junctions). 

One final comment: A 
more secure three-tone sys- 
tem is possible with no fur- 
ther modification of the re- 
ceiver, Merely reconnect 
the 1050-Hz filter/amp (dis- 
connecting the bias resistor 
RB1) and now a simultane- 
ous three-tone signal (of 
which 1050 Hz is one) is 
necessary to trigger the 
alarm. Of course a proper 
three-tone generator would 
have to be designed. Other 
options are available if the 
filter frequency is altered 
from 1050 Hz. 

We believe this design 
achieved our initial objec- 
tive of providing a relatively 
inexpensive alert receiver 
wth minimal modifications 
and additions to an existing 
receiver At the same time it 
did not require an elaborate 
code-generating device. It 
also does not require modifi- 
cations to or need the use of 
other 2-meter equipment. ■ 

73 Magazine * January, 1983 29 



COMPUT 








AEA, the first company to introduce microcomputerized products 
to the Amateur Radio market, is proud to announce the second 

generation of computerized electronic keyers. Each keyer is pre- 
programmed, no computer language is required of the operator. 
The easy to use keypads eliminate up to 75 switches or poten- 
tiometers, thereby greatly simplifying the operation of such 
sophisticated keying systems. We invite you to compare the 
features of our keyers (shown below) to ANY others. 















IMPORTANT KEYER AND/OR 
TRAINER FEATURES ! 


AEA 

MM -2 


AEA 
KT-2 


AEA 
CK-2 


Speed Range (WPM) 


2-99 


1 99 


1-99 


Memory Capacity {Total Characters) 


SOD 


N/A 


500 


Message Partitioning 


Sot! 


N/A 


Soft 


Automatic Contest Serial Number 


Yes 


N/A 


Yes 


Seieetaofe Dot and Dash Memory 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Independent Dot & Dash (Full) Weighting 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Calibrated Speed, 1 WPM Resolution 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Calibrated Beacon Mode 


Yes 


N/A 


No 


Repeal Message Mo4e 


Yes 


HtA 


Yes 


Front Rand Vauable Monitor Frequency 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Message Resume After Paddle interrupt 


Yes 


N/A 


Yes : 


Senm Automatic (Bug) Mode 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Real-Time Memary Loading Mode 


Yes 


N/A 


Yes 


Automatic Word Space Memory Load 


Yes 


N/A 


/ Yes I 


Instant Start From Memory 


Yes 


N/A 


Yes 


Message Editing 


Yes 


N/A 


Yes 


Automatic Stepped Variable Speed 


No 


No 


Yes I 


2 Presetlable Speeds, Instant Recall 


No 


No 


Yes 


Automatic Trainer Speed Increase 


Yes 


Yes 


N/A 


Five Letter or Random Word Length 


Yes 


Yes 


N/A 


Test Mode With Answers 


Yes 


Yes 


N/A 


Random Practice Mode 


Yes 


Yes 


N/A 


Standard Letters. Numbers. Punctual 


Yes 


Yes 


N/A | 


Alt Morse Characters 


Yes 


Yes 


N/A 



For more information write AEA, or bet* 
ter yet see your favorite dealer for a 
demonstration. 

Software ©copyright by AEA. 

PRICES AND SPECIFICATIONS SUBJECT TO 
CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE OR OBLIGATION. 

ADVANCED ELECTRONIC 
APPLICATIONS, INC. 

P.O. Box C-2160, 

Lynnwood, WA 98036 

(206) 775-7373 

Telex: 152571 AEA INTL 



MM-2 







MorseMatic™ 



KT-2 




Keyer Trainei 



CK-2 




Contest Keyer 




Brings you the 
breakthrough! 




WITH TWIN OAKS CW TRALMM. PROGRAMS 





CW TEACHING 
SYSTEMS 

Twin Oaks Assoc iates is a 
partnership of menial health 
professionals who art 1 hams in' 
terested in helping others to 
learn CW. Twin Oaks has de* 
veloped three Morse code 
teaching systems on tape which 
represent the careful applica- 
tion of psychological princi- 
ples to learning. Thev help 
students learn to recognise and 
copy Morse characters at a very 
high speed. 

The first set of tapes is called 
System 12©. It is designed for 
the ham who may hare a Novice 
or Technician class license hut 
can*t "get over the hump" to 
pass the GenemI class code test. 
Svstem 12 takes students past 1 5 
it'ords per minute on five care* 
fully *st ructured, successi ve*de* 
mand, 6Q*minute cassettes. 

The second training program 
is called System 24 It assumes 
that the student is able to copy 
comfortably at 9 or 10 words 
per minute but would like to go 
after the amateur Extra ilass 
license. This program is on five 
60- minute cassettes and carries 
the student past 30 words per 
minute* 

The third teaching system, 
the Svstem 12 Alphabet Book 
is designed for persons who 
know absolute ly nothing about 
Morse code. It mav be used, 
however, by persons who are 
not thoroughly comfortable at 5 
words per minute, and it is use* 
ful for either classroom or self* 
instruction. 

Each * program, or system, 
comes w T ith its own carefully- 
u/rttten study guide. Systems 
12 and 24 cost $30 each, and 
the System 12 Alphabet Book 
costs $15. 



GET HUMP W 

ORDER TODAY! 




TWIN OAKS ASSOCIATES 
ROUTE 530X 37 **w 

KNOXVIIXE 1A 50138. 



30 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



WE SHIP WORLDWIDE 



WORLD WIDE AMATEUR RADIO SINCE 1950 



Your one source for all Radio Equipment! 




ICOM 



We Will Not Be Undersold Call: 

212-925-7000 




KITTY SAYS: FOR THE BEST PRICES IN 
TOWN, BUY AT BARRY'S. All merchandise 
100% guaranteed. Low. low prices. 
FOR ORDERS ONLY PLEASE CALL: 

1-800-221 -2683. 



ms@y 





IC-R70, IC 720A, IC-730, IC-740, IC-25A, 
IC-251A, i€-2KL, IC-451A, IC-290H, IC 45A 



Wherever I go, I take my Radio! 



FTONE, FT-1Q2, FT-101ZD. F7~707, FT-23QR, 
FT-480R. FT-720RU, FT-290R. FRG 7700, FT-625RD 



YAESU 

FT-20SR 

FT700R 



ICOM 
IC2AT 
IC3AT 
IC4AT 



LirwJ Mobil* HfT 

Wflton Mini Com II 

Ymiu FTC-2203, FT-4703 

IcomlCM 12 (Marine 

HCH12 





DRAKE TR5. TR*7A t R-7A, L-7 t L-15, Earth 

Satellite Receiver ESR-24. THETA 9000E & 500, 

Digital Multimeter Model #8550-595,00 







SMART PATCH 



C£S- Simplex Autopatch 510-SA Will Patch FM 
Transceiver To Your Telephone. Great For 
Telephone Calls From Mobile To Base. Simple 
To Use -S319.95. 



SANTEC 
ST-144/UP 

ST-440/UP 




MIRAGE B-23\ B-1016, B 108, 
B-3018, C-22, C-106, D-24, D-1010 



KANTRONICS 

Mini-Reader, Field Day 
Interface >Code Tapes In Stock 



EIMAC 
3-50OZ 

572B, 6JS6C 
12BY7A & 
4-400A 



AEA144MHZ 
AEA440MHZ 
ANTENNAS 





Den Iron Amplifiers, Tuners, Receivers Stock- 
ed: Cllpperton Tj Cllpperton L. GLA tOOOB, 
GLT-1000, Gallon, MLA-2S0O 2 Meter 1fl00 
Walts Linear, MLX Mini Transceiver, The 
Scout C.A.P. Transceiver, Horizon One 
Transceiver, Station One CW Radio Station, 
Write for specs, or call. 

DIGITAL 

FREQUENCY 
COUNTER 

Trtonyx- 

Model TR-1000 

0-600 MHa ™ 

Digimax Model D-510 50 Hz-1GHz 




New York City's 



NEW IMPROVED 
MURCH Model UT2000B 

"" "V BENCHER PADDLES & 

Vibroplex Keys In Stock! ! 

LARGEST STOCKING HAM DEALER 
COMPLETE REPAIR LAB ON PREMISES 




Tri Et T Cw ers ^^ 

Hy^Gatn Towers & Antennas, 
and Rotors will be shipped 
direct to you FREE of shipping cost. 



MAIL ALL ORDERS TO BARRY ELECTRONICS CORP., 512 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY, NY 10012, 



BARRY INTERNATIONAL TELEX 12-7670 

TOP TRADES GIVEN ON YOUR USED EQUIPMENT 

STORE HOURS: Monday-Friday 9 to 6:30 PM 
Saturday & Sunday 10 to 4 PM (Free Parking) 

AUTHORIZED DISTS. MCKAY DYMEK FOR 
SHORTWAVE ANTENNAS & RECEIVERS. 
IRT0. EX- "Spring St. Station" 
Subways: BUT "Prince St. Station" 

IND-"F" TraJnBwy. Station" 

Bus: Broadway #6 to Spring St, 



305 



"Aqui 

Se Habla 
Espanol" 



DE 



We Stock: AEA, ARRL. Alpha, Ameco, Antenna Specialists. Astatic. 
Astron, B & K. 6 & W, Bash, Bencher. Bird. Butternut. CDE, CES, Collins, 
Communications Spec. Connectors. Covercraft. Cubic (Swan), 
Cushcraft, Daiwa, Dentron, Digimax. Drake, ETO (Alpha), Eimac, En- 
comm, Henry, Hustler (Newtronics) t Hy-Gain, leom, KLM. Kantronics. 
Larsen, MCM (Daiwa), MFJ, J.W. Miller, Mini-Products, Mirage. 
Newtrontes. Nye Viking. Palomar. RF Products, Radio Amateur Callbook. 
Robot. Rockwell Collins. Sexton, Shore, Swan, Telex, Tempo, Ten-Tec. 
Tokyo Hi Power. Trionyx TUBES, W2AU, Waber. Wilson, Yaesu Ham and 
Commercial Radios,Vocom, Vibroplex, Curtis, Tri-EX Wacom DupJexers, 
Repeaters. Phelps Dodge, Fanon Intercoms, Scanners, Crystals. 

WE NOW STOCK COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS 

ALER INQUIRIES INVITED PHONE IN YOUR ORDER & BE REIMBURSED. 



Amateur Radio Courses Given On Our Premises 

Export Orders Shipped Immediately. 



Charles Leo Suggs WB6FHD 
1172 No. Ardmore Ave. 
Hollywood CA 90029 



Trimming the Fat from ATV 

Why use 3 MHz when 500 kHz will do? 

WB6FHD proposes a way. 



My colleagues of the 
Southern California 
Amateur Television Club 
have been asking me to sub- 
mit an extended article to 
73 Magazine since my brief 
presentation of this con- 
cept at our monthly club 
meeting, July, 1980, and its 
subsequent publication in 
our August newsletter. My 
purpose in publishing this 
article is to stimulate those 
of my radio amateur col- 
leagues blest with true sci- 
entific creativity to develop 
this concept into a refined 
state-of-the-art system of 
global amateur radio televi- 
sion communication. 

The development of a 
practical narrowband sys- 
tem of real television, in the 
true sense of the word, is of 
tremendous importance at 
this time, because every 
time we turn around, this or 
the other big commercial 
interest wants to lobby the 
FCC to give them portions 
of our amateur bands for 
their own private use, even 
though other amateurs in 
other countries still contin- 
ue to use these same fre- 
quencies. My proposal not 



only will result in making it 
possible to transmit a pic- 
ture almost similar in qual- 
ity to a commercial tele- 
vison station, but will do ft 
in only one-twelfth of the 
usual channel bandwidth 
normally required. It will do 
this as low as six meters if 
we get together and peti- 
tion the FCC with a propo- 
sal for experimental nar- 
rowband television privi- 
leges on the almost disused 
upper three-fourths of the 
band. 

Another reason I want 
the experimentation to be 
on six meters is that occa- 
sionally there are some 
pretty good band openings 
into other countries, 

I want to give thanks to 
Al Lipkin W3AEH, whose 
narrowband TV article in 
the 1964 ATV Experimenter 
Anthology (by 73 Magazine) 
inspired me to carry his idea 
through the next few logical 
steps to the present engi- 
neering conceptualization 
of the entire system, all the 
way from camera to TV re- 
ceiver. I sincerely hope that 
this article will start an ava- 
lanche of contributions by 




DET 

COMPAP 



HQRI? SYNC 
OUTPUT TO 
TV CAMERA 



VERT SYNC 
OUTPUT jr\ 
TW CAMERA 



BOHl FROM 
POWEFt MAW5 
INPUT TO \-C 



Fig. 1. The sync-generator countdown frequency-divider 
chain. 



other engineers — as hap- 
pened with SSTV exactly 
twenty years ago. 

My profession is elec- 
tronics-concepts design en- 
gineering, but I was caught 
in the aerospace layoffs of 
1969 and have not been ac- 
tive in it since then. This 
means I am not up on the 
newest devices and tech- 
nology, and accordingly 
will not submit any sche- 
matics. 

The most interesting 
things about this proposal 
are that: 

• The entire channel, 
video and sound combined, 
can be fitted into a band- 
width of only 500 kHz, 

• The video and sound sig- 
nals are generated inde- 
pendently, each crystal- 
controlled, both just above 
10 MHz, 

• Using simple SSB tech- 
niques (but no balanced 
modulator! the lower vesti- 
gial video sideband is com- 
pletely filtered out like an 
SSB signal, while retaining 
the carrier (for the present, 
but some day. ?). 

• The signal is now hetero- 
dyned from just above 10 

MHz upward in frequency 
to the region between 51 
and 54 MHz, where the 
maximum video modulat- 
ing frequency will be less 
than one percent of the fi- 
nal transmitting carrier fre- 
quency, as with good engi- 
neering practice. 

• The scanning standards 
will be: 225 lines per frame, 



4:1 interlace, 15 frames per 
second, 60 fields per sec- 
ond, 56.25 lines per field. 

The horizontal deflec- 
tion frequency will be 3,375 
Hz, and the vertical deflec- 
tion frequency will be 60 
Hz. The synchronizing puls- 
es for the TV camera are 
generated by solid-state fre- 
quency divider-corn para- 
tors and a phase-locked 
loop. The master frequency 
for the countdown (fre- 
quency-dividing) sequence 
will be 13,500 Hz. 

To obtain the horizontal 
sync pulses, some of the 
master-frequency oscillator 
output goes to a divide-by- 
four device, output 3,375 
Hz. To obtain the vertical 
sync pulses, some of the 
master-frequency oscillator 
output (1 3,500 Hz) goes to a 
series of divide-by devices 
(see Fig, 1) resulting in an 
output of 60 Hz, This sync 
generator will provide the 
camera's modified horizon- 
tal and vertical sweep oscil- 
lator/amplifiers with the 
complex sync necessary to 
scan a 225-1 ine f 4:1 interlace 
raster on the cameras vidi- 
con image tube. 

If the usual practice of 
ATVers is to be the case, 
this system will work fine, 
as there will be no discern- 
ible flicker if the motion in 
the image is not excessively 
rapid. We ATVers who use 
vidicon TV cameras know 
better than to either pan the 
camera quickly or go sud- 
denly from a bright to a 



32 73 Magazine * January. 1983 



dimly-illuminated scene, as 
we get smear in the image. 
The reduced horizontal 
scan rate will increase the 
vidicon's light sensitivity 
due to the photoelectric/ 
photon-charge-storage prin- 
ciple, so an ordinary table 
lamp should suffice to light 
up the shack. 

You might ask, why use 
only 225 lines in the image? 
Commercial television uses 
525 lines; wouldn't the pic- 
ture have less than half the 
sharpness, resolution, and 
detail of standard TV? Be- 
lieve it or not, unless you 
have a huge screen and are 
almost sitting on the set 
you probably won't even 
notice the difference. Have 
you seen how sharp the pic- 
ture is on a 14" surveil- 
lanee-carnera monitor TV 
screen, or how crisp the de- 
tail is on your living room 
TV set when the kids are 
playing with the TV game? 
Those security systems and 
the TV games have one 
thing in common: The im- 
ages are non-interlaced, 
and provide an image of on- 
ly 2625 lines on a security 
monitor or on any TV set. 

I'm sure you're all won- 
dering by now how a TV set 
can receive both a 525-line 
and 262,5-line image! Did 
you know that when your 
TV set is not receiving a sig- 
nal, it is scanning only 262.5 
lines on the screen? Wheth- 
er or not you're receiving a 
signal an interlaced signal 
or a non-interlaced signal, 
the TV set's scan oscillators 
don't change frequency. 
The 2:1 interlace system 
used in commercial televi- 
sion allows twice the num- 
ber of scanning lines (and r 
therefore, vertical image de- 
tail) to be scanned by the TV 
camera than its scan-system 
oscillators, actually operat- 
ing at no difference in fre- 
quency, would normally 
scan. 

Whether the camera is 
scanning 262.5 lines or 525 
lines, the maximum video 
frequency in the camera 
output is exactly the same. 



A 525-line non-interlaced 
picture would require a hor- 
izontal deflection frequen- 
cy of twice that used for an 
interlaced system, and the 
maximum video frequency 
also would be twice that of 
an interlaced system. As for 
the difference between the 
262. 5-line picture which 
was discussed earlier and a 
225-1 ine picture, the differ- 
ence amounts to only 37,5 
lines — slightly noticeable, 
yes, but only if you had a 
262.5-line picture being dis- 
played on another TV set of 
the same screen size along- 
side. 

In practice, a 14" screen 
is about the largest practi- 
cal size for a 225-line TV 
system, and at a viewing 
distance of eight feet, no 
line structure can be re- 
solved by the eye. The 4:1 
interlace system outlined in 
this proposal consists of 
transmitting four coarse- 
scan fields, each consisting 
of 56.25 lines, in 1/15 of a 
second, to form a complete 
frame of 225 interlaced 
scanning lines. 

The requirements for de- 
signing a 4:1 interlace sys- 
tem are as follows: The 
master frequency must end 
in a zero, and each divider 
stage downward in frequen- 
cy must also end in a zero, 
all the way down to the 
mains-power frequency. 
The vertical scanning fre- 
quency must be the same as 
and lock to the mains-pow- 
er frequency. The horizon- 
tal scanning frequency 
must be 1/4th of the master 
frequency, and end in the 
whole number five. The to- 
tal number of lines compris- 
ing a frame, when divided 
by four, must end in the 
decimal ,25 in the lines-per- 
field count. 

Only a very limited num- 
ber of different 4:1 inter- 
lace line-count systems 
which are mathematically 
possible are practical for a 
television system of this 
kind, and far fewer can be 
constructed to work, much 
less work reliably, if a rela- 



tively high frequency must 
be divided to a far lower 
frequency in just one de- 
vice. This is because of 
these three big problems to 
be solved: stability, obtaiiv 
ability, and cost 

The following is for a 
225-line-per-frame system 
with a 3X4 aspect ratio: 
The horizontal deflection 
frequency of 3,375 Hz is de- 
rived by multiplying the 
rate of frames per second 
(1 5) times the line count per 
frame (225). If the line-per- 
frame count is divided by 
four, we get the Ime-per- 
f leld count of 56.25, as four 
of these interleaved fields 
are scanned consecutive- 
ly to form one complete 
frame. The usable lines and 
portions thereof for the im- 
age with any line-count or 
aspect-ratio scan system 
are approximately and on 
the average only 5/6ths of 
the total lines scanned, due 
to loss of lines during verti- 
cal retrace time, vertical 
and horizontal overscan on 
the camera image tube, and 
other scanning efficiency 
factors. 

To calculate the maxi- 
mum video frequency 
which will be produced by a 
television system, we first 
consider the aspect ratio 
(the ratio of height to 
width). In America, we use 
an aspect ratio of three 
units high to four units 
wide, or 3X4. Converting 
the 225-lines per frame to 
picture elements (pixels), 
we have 225 pixels vertical- 
ly. As we have a 3X4 as- 
pect ratio, 225 pixels is 
therefore only 3/4ths of 
what must be the horizon- 
tal pixel count; it follows 
that the horizontal pixel 
count is 300. The total num- 
ber of pixels per frame, 
then, is 67,500, and multi- 
plied times 15 frames per 
second is 1,012,500. 

We must now divide this 
large number by 2, as at 
this point it must be un- 
derstood that the maxi- 
mum video frequency con- 
sists of alternate black and 



white squares on each scan- 
ning line, a black and white 
pair equaling one full cy- 
cle. When the video signal 
is closely examined, how- 
ever, it is found that on- 
ly the black (or only the 
white) squares count as the 
maximum measured video 
frequency Therefore, 
1,012,500 cycles divided by 
2 is 506 r 250, and as we only 
have 5/6th efficiency, it fol- 
lows that the maximum vid- 
eo frequency is 421,875 Hz. 

For the sake of making 
things slightly easier, divide 
the product of total pixels 
times "rep-rate" by 2,4, 
(1 .012,500 divided by 2,4 is 
421,875.) Using the same 
system to calculate the 
maxium video frequency of 
a conventional commercial 
TV camera, 525 pixels x 700 
pixels is 367, 500 pixels X 30 
frames/second is 11,025,000 
divided by 2.4 is 4,593,750 
Hz. 

In commercial practice, 
a filter limits the maxi- 
mum video frequency to 
4,000,000 Hz. As this 225- 
line system is incompatible 
with commercial television 
standards, it must be point- 
ed out that commercial 
vacuum-tube TV camera 
and TV sets can be modi- 
fied easily to a 225-line sys- 
tem, and what's more, III 
tell you just how to do it, 
too! 

To begin with, the verti- 
cal deflection circuits in 
both TV cameras and TV 
sets aren't touched at all, as 
both systems are locked to 
60 Hz. The TV camera con* 
version, first of all, must 
have the solid-state sync- 
generator board installed 
within, along with its power 
source. The horizontal- 
sweep circuitry will have to 
be modified from a fre- 
quency of 15,750 Hz to 
3,375 Hz. If the vidicon 
won't fully scan horizontal- 
ly, either more energy is re- 
quired or the associated de- 
flection coil hasn't enough 
inductance to give a good 
reactive load at this much 
lower deflection frequency. 

73 Magazine * January, 1983 33 



H 



TV 

CAMERA 
225 LIN. 
I5fps 



R-F 

AMP 

lOOrciW 



CRV&TAL 

osc 

10 475 
MHz 



I 



LOWER 
VESTIGAL 
SIDEBAND 
FILTER 



VIDEO RF 

& 

AUDIO RF 

MIXER 



VIDEO 
AMP a 
VIDEO 
MOD. 



VHF 

POWER 

MIXER 



I 





VHF 




LINEW 




POWER 




AMP 



CR VSTAL 

INJECT. 

OSC 



MIKE 



CD- 



AUD 
AMP. 



6EACT 
MOD 



FRANKLIN 
SELF- 
EXCITED 

osc. 



□ 



SUFFER 
AMP. 



R-F 

&MP 
lOOmW 



AUTO. 
AFC a 
PHASE 

LOCK CKT. 



CRYSTAL 

OSC 

10925 

MHz. 



Fig. 2. The rf-generator video and audio-exciter chain. 



Instead of the high-imped- 
ance horizontal-sweep 
tube, a silicon PNP transis- 
tor may have to be used, as 
its output impedance is 
low, and at 3,375 Hz it will 
be 'looking into" a load 
which will be closer to a 
correct impedance match. 

The receiver conversion 
will be fun, The horizontal- 
oscillator/amplifier circuit 
will continue to provide the 
picture tube with high volt- 
age, but that's all. The afc 
circuit will be disconnected 
from both the horizontal 
oscillator and the horizon- 
tal-output transformer, and 
the horizontal deflection 
coils will be disconnected 
from the same transformer, 
A solid-state horizontal-os- 
cillator/amplifier circuit 
will be built using the latest 
state-of-the-art phase- 
locked-loop technology to 
'lock the sync" even under 
adverse conditions of 
heavy QRM. 

As with the TV camera, a 
silicon PNP transistor will 
likely be required to direct- 
ly drive the horizontal-de- 
flection coils. The metal 
case of the transistor will be 
grounded directly to the 
metal chassis of the TV set 
(and remember, the transis- 
tor's case is the collector) 
and the emitter will be con- 
nected to the sawtooth- 
scan side of the horizontal- 
deflection coils. The other 
end of the same coils will 
go to the plus side of the 

34 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



transistor's power supply. 
Since both the horizontal 
sweep frequency and the 
circuit impedances are now 
much lower than before, 
the diode damper normally 
required in the horizontal- 
output circuit should not be 
needed. Of course, the one 
in the high voltage power 
supply will naturally re- 
main, as it is part of the 
"bootstrap" power supply 
associated with the high- 
voltage circuit to the pic- 
ture tube. 

An electron-beam 
squelching circuit will have 
to be added to put a dc volt- 
age on the picture tube's 
electrode which blanks out 
the vertical retrace lines, 
because when no signal is 
being received to cause a 
fully 4:1 interlaced raster to 
appear on the screen, the 
free-running deflection cir- 
cuits in the modified TV re- 
ceiver will be scanning only 
56.25 lines on the picture 
tube, This much-reduced 
scan of only one field will 
be intensely bright and will 
permanently damage the 
phosphorescent coating on 
the face of the picture tube 
with ugly brown horizontal 
streaks from which little or 
no useful light will come. 
Remember, 3,375-Hz hori- 
zontal-scan frequency di- 
vided by 60 Hz vertical- 
scan frequency equals 
56.25 lines on the picture 
tube! 

Now, on to the signal cir- 



10.4*5 MHi - 

VIDEO CARRIER 
FREQUENCY 



REJECTED LOWER 
VESTIGAL VIDEO 
SIDEBAND 




IO/&25 MH2 
AUDIO CAfifllER 
FREQUENCY 



Fig. 3. The over-coupled, double-humped-response curve of 
the modified 10,7-MHz i-f transformer used in the out* 
put/filter circuit of the video-modulated rf amplifier. 



cuits, The TV set's tuner 
must have the swamping re- 
sistors removed to narrow 
down the band-pass to 
around 500 kHz. The chan- 
nel 2 coils will be our con- 
cern here, as the signal coils 
will be centered between 51 
and 54 MHz, say, 52.5 MHz, 
The oscillator will be modi- 
fied to tune this range, but 
23 MHz above. Why 23 
MHz? Only the older TV 
sets had an i-f that low; all 
modern TV sets use 40-MHz 
i-f amplifiers! Well, first of 
all, the modern i-f s are 
twice as broad as we need, 
so they'll have to go — and 
be replaced with some 
Miller (or other) bifilar- 
wound 20-MHz i-f trans- 
formers, with best Q at 
around 23 MHz, All of the 
swamping resistors associ- 
ated with the former i-f 
transformers are to be re- 
moved, of cou rse. Al I of the 
i-fs will be tuned to the 
same frequency, not only 
for best gain, but with three 
i-f stages — optimum band- 
width, too. At the output of 
the last i-f stage, the band- 
pass should be around 500 
kHz at -3 dB + 

If it is desired to use an 
intercarrier sound-recovery 
system, it will operate on a 
frequency of 450 kHz, as 
this is the heterodyne differ- 
ence frequency between 
the picture and sound car- 
rier frequencies. 455 kHz i-f 
transformers will tune 
down here easily. The 
sound system is NBFM with 
plus and minus 5-kHz devia- 
tion. Another way to re- 
cover the sound is by using 
a low-band FM communica- 
tions receiver made to tune 
below 30 MHz to the region 
between 22 and 24 MHz. 



The local oscillator should 
be converted from crystal 
control to self-excited, with 
the tuning control on the 
front panel. An afc circuit 
should be added to prevent 
drifting off center frequen- 
cy. 

Now we get to the piece 
de resistance, the rf genera- 
tor. A block diagram is 
shown in Fig. 2. The video 
circuit will consist of a crys- 
tal-control led oscillator 
driving a very low-powered 
amplifier with an output be- 
low 100 mW. This amplifier 
will be grid- or cathode- 
modulated by a video am- 
plifier/modulator, supplied 
with composite negative- 
going video and sync by the 
modified TV camera. The 
output of the videomodu- 
lated amplifier will pass 
through a lower vestigial 
video-sideband filter com- 
posed of a large 10.7- 
MHz FM i-f transformer 
with overcoupled primary 
and secondary windings; 
this is in order to slightly 
broaden the bandpass and 
form the characteristic 
double-humped response 
curve. 

Other components of the 
filter include a tunable 
107-MHz series-T rejection 
trap, and a few crystals — in 
order to put a deep, wide 
notch just below the video- 
carrier frequency so that 
the lower vestigial video 
sideband will be complete- 
ly filtered out The video- 
carrier crystal oscillator 
will operate at a frequen- 
cy of 10.475 MHz. The au- 
dio-carrier crystal oscillator 
will operate at a frequen- 
cy of 10,925 MHz. These 
two frequencies are 450 
kHz apart; both are sym- 





16 
MODELS 



MFJ-941C 300 Watt Versa Tuner II 

Has SWR/Wattmeter, Antenna Switch, Balun. Matches everything 1.8-30 MHz: dipoles, vees, 
random wires, verticals, mobile whips, beams, balanced lines, coax lines. 



Ham Radio's most popular 
antenna tuner. Improved, too. 





95 



Fastest selling MFJ tuner . . . because it has 
the most wanted features at the best price, 

Matches everything from 1.8-3QMHz: dipoles, 
inverted vees. random wires, verticals, mobile 
whips, beams, balanced and coax lines. 

Hun up to 300 watts RF power outpjjt 

SWR and dual range wattmeter (300 & 30 
watts full scale, forwaroVreflected power). Sensi- 
tive meter measures SWR to 5 watts. 

MFJ-900 VERSA TUNER 



MFJ-900 




$ 49 



95 

( + $*) 



Matches coax, random wires 1.8 30 MHz. 

Handles up to 200 watts output; efficient air 
wound inductor gives more watts out. 5x2x6". 

Use any transceiver, solid state or tube. 

Operate all bands with one antenna. 
2 OTHER 200W MODELS: 

MFJ 901, $59 M { + $4), like 900 but includes 
4.1 balun for use with balanced lines. 

MFJ 16010, $39.95 ( + $4), for random wires 
only. Great tor apartment, motel, camping, opera 
tion. Tunes 1.8-30 MHz. 

MFJ-984 VERSA TUNER IV 




MFJ-984 



$ 329 



95 

(+S1Q) 



Up to 3 KW PEP and it matches any teedline, 
1 .8-30 MHz, coax, balanced or random, 

10 amp RF ammeter assures max. power at 
min. SWR SWR/Wattmeter, tor./ref,, 2000/200 w 
10 position dual inductor, ceramic switch. 
7 pot, ant. switch. 250 pi 6KV cap. 5x1 4x1 4" 
300 watt dummy load. 4:1 fertile balun, 
3 MORE 3 KW MODELS: MFJ 981. $239.95 
(f$10) + like 984 fess ant. switch, ammeter 
MFJ9B2, $239.95 (4- $10), like 984 less am 
meter, SWR/Watlmeter. MFJ-900, $209.95 
( + S10). like 982 less ant. switch. 

See Us1 of Advertisers on page IM 



Flexible antenna switch selects 2 coax lines, 
direct or through tuner, random wire/balanced line, 
or tuner bypass for dummy load. 

12 position efficient airwound inductor for 
lower losses, more watts out. 

Built-in 4:1 balun for balanced lines. 1000V 
capacitor spacing, 

Works with all solid state or tube rigs. 

Easy to use, anywhere. Measures 8x2x6", has 

MFJ-949B VERSA TUNER II 



MFJ-949B 




MFJ's best 300 watt Versa Tuner II. 

Matches everything from 1.8 30 MHz, coax, 
randoms, balanced lines, up to 300 W output, 
solid state or tubes. 

Tunes out SWR on dipoles, vees, long wires, 
verticals, whips, beams, quads. 

Built-in 4:1 balun. 3.00W , 50- ohm dumm y load , 
SWR meter and 2 -range wattmeter (300W & SOW). 

6 positron antenna switch on front panel, 12 
position air wound inductor; coax connectors, bind- 
ing posts, black and beige case 10x3x7". 

MFJ-989 VERSA TUNER V 




MFJ-989 



$ 329 



95 

( + $10) 



New smaller size matches new smaller rigs - 
only 10-3MWx4 1/2Hxl4 7/80", 

3 KW PEP. 250 pt 6KV caps. Matches coax, 
balanced lines, random wires 1.8-30 MHz. 

Roller inductor, 3 digit turns counter plus spin 
ner knob for precise inductance control to get 
tha! SWR down. 

Built- in 300 watt, 50 ohm dummy load. 

Built-in 4:1 ferrite balun. 

Built-in lighted 2% meter reads SWR plus for 
ward/reflected power. 2 ranges (200 & 2000W). 

5 position ant. switch. Al cabinet. Tilt bail. 



S0-239 connectors, 5- way binding posts f fin- 
ished m eggshell white with walnut grained sides. 
4 Other 300W Models: MFJ-940B, $79.95 
( + $4), fike 941 C less balun, MFJ445. $79.95 
( + $4), like 941C less antenna switch. MFJ-944, 
$79.95 ( + $4) r like 945, fess SWR/Wattmeter, 
MFJ-943, $69.95 ( + $4), like 944, less antenna 
switch. Optional mobile bracket for 941 C, 940B. 
945, 944, $3 00. 

MFJ- 962 VERSA TUNER III 



MFJ-962 




Run up to 1-5 KW PEP, match any feed line 
from 1.8 30 MHz. 

Built-in SWR/Watlmeter has 2000 and 200 
watt ranges, forward and reflected. 

6 position antenna switch handles 2 coax lines 
(direct or through tuner), wire and balanced lines. 

4:1 balun. 250 pf 6KV cap. 12 pos. inductor. 
Ceramic switches. Black cabinet, panel. 

ANOTHER 1.5 KW MODEL MFJ 961. $189.95 
(+$10), similar bul fess SWR/Wattmeter. 

MFJ- 10. 3 foot coax with connectors, $4,95. 



To order or for your nearest dealer 

j CALL TOLL FREE **■■ 
J 800-647*1800 L 



For tech. info,, order or repair status, or caHs 
outside continental U.S. and inside Miss., call 
601-3235869, 

• All MFJ products unconditionally guaranteed for 
one year (except as noted). 

• Products ordered from MFJ are returnable within 
30 days for full refund (less shipping). 

• Add shipping & handling charges in amounts 
shown in parentheses. 



Write for FREE catalog, over BO products 

ENTERPRISES, 

INCORPORATED 



MFJ 



.-47 Box 494, Mississippi State, MS 39762 



73 Magazine * January, 1983 35 



metrically on opposite sides 
of the 10.7-MHz center fre- 
quency of the i-f trans- 
former, and both, therefore, 
are the same number of dBs 
down on the transformer's 
response curve, 

The FM audio signal's rf 
does not pass through the 
same i-f transformer used in 
the output/filter circuit of 
the video-modulated rf am- 
plifier, but it will pass 
through a similar transform- 
er in the output of the video 
rf/audio rf mixer The 10.925- 
MHz FM audio generator 
will have one crystal oscil- 
lator and one afc phase- 
locked loop self-excited os- 
cillator, both operating on 
the same frequency. The 
time constant of the afc/ 
phase-lock circuit will al- 
low for FM carrier devia- 
tion. 

Now comes the rest of 
the answer to the question 
I'm sure all of you are ask- 
ing by now, which is: Why 
does he keep harping on six 



meters? Doesn't he know 
that the FCC would never 
allow "that sort of thing," 
and hasn't he heard about 
the "national band-appor- 
tionment plan"? Well, I'll 
tell you, at the risk of 
sounding like some sort of 
rebel. 

First of all, about FCC — 
how many of you can re- 
member back when we 
could do anything we want- 
ed to do on those ultra- 
shortwave bands? I do! As 
for this so-called national 
band-appointment plan, 
how many of you out there 
really agree wholehearted- 
ly with how two meters and 
now 220 have been and are 
being chopped up into neat 
little slices for all of those 
open and closed machines? 

Where are those "wide 
open spaces" we knew in 
the 40s and 50s where we 
had megacycles to burn? I 
know, I know — progress! 
OK, fine. Two things I 
know: A long time ago, I 



read somewhere that no 
one has a monopoly or right 
to any "personal" frequen- 
cy in the "ham bands" — 
and I've got a box full of 
crystals for six and two me- 
ters and I guess a lot of 
them must fall across re- 
peater-band edges and out- 
puts! 

'Nuff said? I think so, too, 
so let's get back to business. 
By now, at least a few of 
you must be wanting to say, 
Hey! How can a country 
with a different mains- 
power frequency than ours 
send us a picture with a 
50-Hz vertical-deflection 
frequency and some cocka- 
mamie horizontal frequen- 
cy and we receive it? 

That's easy! All you have 
to do is remember that your 
TV set doesn't care what it 
gets — just design enough 
latitude into your horizon- 
tal and vertical hold con- 
trols and their phase- 
locked-loop circuits, and 
you can reach out and hold 



on to the "man in the 
moon"! 

Next question: How 
about color? Thought you'd 
never ask! 

Let's get black and white 
off the ground first (!) but, 
since you won't get any 
sleep unless I tell you, here 
goes. Yes, of course, the 
present American or Euro- 
pean systems can be con- 
verted to work with my sys- 
tem. The TV receiver should 
have many adjustments 
(like a scope) so that any 
scan system, type, and po- 
larity of sync or modulation 
can be received. Incidental- 
ly, I've got another, even 
narrower-band system of 
real TV which I can tell you 
about It would fit into an 
FM channel. Of course, it 
wouldn't have nearly the 
definition or quality of 
what I'm offering you here. 
However, HI give you one 
more hint. It would be like 
slow scan r but real TV 
Cheerio! 



WHEN YOU NEED JUST 
A LITTLE MORE AUDIO 

The F4STMK® model 2003 audio amplifier ^ 
module produces 250 mW of low THD audio, 
This transformerless design has a low parts 
count and does not require a heatsink. 

The model 2003 features a dc-operated volume 
control. Output level is selected by changing a 
dc voltage with an on-board pot, remote pot 
or micro-computer D/A interface. 

output drives speaker or 



■ :■'■■ 



Low-Z, aocou 
headphones. 







^ Dc-type volume control assures hum-free 
operation without using shielded cable to 
I the volume control 

^ No interstage transformers or heatsinks, 

^ Compatible with other MSTTV4K* modules, 
such as the model 2002 sound synthesizer. 

► One evening assembly using 3.6 by LO 
inch pc board and instructions supplied. 

^ Price: $9.45 

Price includes; gLass-epoxy, etched, plated, drilled pc board; 
instruction manual; postage in U,5«A. (Ohio residents add 
5% sales tax) 






Send SL00 for illustrated 
refund coupon. 



* product catalog and 




Proham Electronics Incorporate]) 

3Mt2D LAKELAND BLVD EASTLAKE OH mrttfM 



STATE-OF-THE-ART 



The Saturn V is a deep fringe microwave receiver for homeowners 
that are outside of itie service area of [oca! pay TV stations (■ e., 
HBO. Showtime). It is normally used wilhin line of sight of a trans- 
muting lower m a 50 mile range and fs simply attached to your TV 
antenna mast. This unit is completely ready to install including all 
cable and mounting hardware. It is designed to be installed by the 
homeowner. 

We accept MasterCharge & Visa, 



T 



Industries f w 1 

4558 Auburn Blvd.. Suite 208 1 

Sacramento. California 95841 |9i6> 454-2190 -*7Z 



36 73 Magazine * January, 1983 






SWD-1 VIDEO CONVERTER 



FOR CABLE TV 

p^ k The SWD-l Video Converter is ulJ- 

L-^*" _^^& ^ died on cabin TV systems id re- 

mow* the KHl'a Signal trrjm a 
cjiitpnetJ video I channel 3 in/ 
out] «rid *liQ pat* Thru the 
-^ normal undiitoned^'delectcfl 

audio tjgnaf Rocker twitch 
lelwrli 60ef*1in$ mode lo t«t«jvb KHi's 
distortion fforn rhe video Of pui ill ot her chan- 
nels normally Simple id ■ ■■cmbie — less ihsn 30 
minutes Preiur^rf input/output Channel 3 Impedance 
75 ohm*. 1 1 7VAC 

SWD-1 Video Convener Kit $69.95 



^• 



1 



VTR ACCESSORIES 



^ -^ 



N VIDEO STABILIZER 

^ Simple Simon Video Stebiiuef. 
Model VS-125. eliminates the wr- 
t*c*i n>ll *nd |m*r (ram copy tfusnT 
video up** wften playing thnjugh 
lerge Screen protectors or on an- 
other VTft Simple to use. fust adjust 
I lock contfOi lOr m Habit bwitunr Cmt e irt* contra t n i«t the '.ape 
will pUy «M the w*y IhrauQh wtthoul further «dpj iT^re n ?i Includes 
t2v power supotv IPfCJeU 

VS- 1 25 Video Stabilizer, wired »^s*9* ttl 15 



N/Cft 



aV*V 




Ten* 
AppraiirnstSTf 

S MmutH 



MODULATOR 

Not a Game Type Modulator 
The WPS-lK.t converts Vtdeo/Audia 
ugneli to s crystal controlled' RF 
output for TV Channel* 3 end 4 
The MPS-1 Modulator inputs 
art designed to match all TV 
and VCR s end features a 
vortaoe regulated power supply, power 
switch and LED indicator. No Tuning RequtfedL 
Operateton117VAC 

MPS- 1 Kit. .* + ...*., S3 9 95 




UKF ANTENNAS and ACCESSORIES 



MDS-AMATEUR-ETV 32 ELEMENT 



a in a Kit 
• 1*21 GHr * 38'V Len V 
e 23rJB Avinga Gain a Committial firaii 
a Oit Ceit Waterpreel Himeuq with 4*A H i 2 1 *" 
Aim fat ElicttaniE* 
• Includes P.C. Probe, F-il Connecter and Mounting Hardwire 

MAE-2 3? Elemsitl VAGI Antenna S2395 

Kam Sam' Down Converter Kit * 1 J - 2.5GHz* 

Designed far Sanpte Simon try lormer Japanese CQ Amateur Maganrw's UHF 
tdiTQt/tnginow. Unii dtihres new ingenious Piinlutl Circurt Probe tor minimum 
pin. Circuh haarrt fits inside MAE-2 antenna housing, Requires 1 hour issembty 
IC and capaciTnis pre-suldErod 
Modal KSDC-KIT 1.3 - 2.5GH/ Down Coihiwter PCil . . S 34.95 

Km Sons' Regulated Varible DC Power Supply 

Fiji usb With KSDC-KIT 1.9 - 2.5&Hr Duwn Cmivurtor ComptalrHy assembled 
with Amative- Cabinet, TV/Converter Mode Switch, Frequency Control ltd 
LED Indicator 
Model KSPS-1A Aiambled Fpuw Supply $23.95 



SPECIAL 

INTRODUCTORY 

SAVINGS 




ORDER ALL THREE ITEMS 

MAE -J. KSDC • KIT airi §*] A Q 5 

CO AX CABLES ARE NDT INCLUDED — 



ZYZZX VHF-UHF Wideband Antenna Amplifier 




u 




50 MHz - 9DD MHj 



Imtotioiinr Nt* HT6RI0 IC BrtKbiil Anplifiert 

Model AU-1 UdBGam 
Model ALL-2 35dfi Gam 




aii-i 

ALL J 



UAtt Ul 






la mi 



J4 «l AU-1 Wp* Tim * bv 



4AJ& 



Our New STVA 14.5dB GAIN, 14 ELiMENT 
CORNER REFLECTOR YAEI ANTENNA 




Electronically 



Bambi Electronic Video Switch .„ 
makes switching of your VCR/VTR 
Pay TV Decoders, Cable TV, Video 
Discs, Video Games, Closed Circuit 
TV, Antennae and Microcomputer as 
easy as pushing buttons. 



Th* EJambi Electronic Video 3* 
kriq network whicti csn ^ceepf up to irx diffcte- - 
source* of vidso signals etnd provide tfra ftentibilitv of 
directing the inputs to any or all of the) three outputs. 

How you can eliminate ... the drudgery of disconnecting end 
reconnecting your video equipment each time you use it 
tile tangled mess of cables which are impossible to trace 
out ...not being able to use more than one function 
3t a time, 

Bambi lets you enjoy using your video equipment the 
way it should be _ electmnrcally and on line at the 
push of a button. 



/ 



Model BEVS-I CofMetely Wirtd and 
Assembled, includes eomproheruirve Instmc* 
B on/ Operation Manual and Oecai Set ter 
custom izing your Vrdeo Switch tnataFlitiofv 



S 



129 



95 



Bambi 
Poster 

•nth 
purchase 







1 

BAND ■ i ■ > ■ * r 


1 

1 «aa* 

■ - A A * 

■ — i 4. * 


&MTTHWC 1 




___ {' ' ■ ' ■ ' 




0--- & S © © 3 © 

u d nr »i_jb ■ — r *_i SaJL 




Bambi"} from panal wax d-esign«d with tho 
uaar in mind. Computer styled cariHtiucItan, 
with saft -Couch- keybaard (rsled lor over 10 
milNon operations), arranged in malriH (orm 
■Mows eaay input/ output gEPeclian without 
ratanng to charts. Functions sslect«d through 
the keyboBrd srs immediately displayed on 
the IB LED status indicators 



Chech tt\m quality t)t Bambi »gain->t th«t of 
much h«flh*r priced competiUDn. AH solid 
italt alactrank twitching providas low atlan- 
wition (3dB| P wide Irequsncy response (40- 
BSO tAHil and sxceHent isoEetion be two en 
aignal sources (each I/O section indtviduelly 
ahftilded for €SdB mm. isoletionj 



Berrabf a Spectffcatidits: 

• 5<gnai Loss 

• KkMsa 

• Input Return Loss 
e Isolation 



75 ahm 
348±T0e 

trlBlMB 
I2d8 mm 
65dB rrnn 



Dimensions 
Weight 



1 1 7VAC 60 Hi. 2W 
4UV(H 




UHF TUNER 

Medal UES-A5AF 



Ft«r. finv WW - WHHt 
Atnttti* iHful ?5 «Tib» 
i*-B3 Omm PotbIJ 



Kit 



P*RT 
Nn 



«■*»'■ 



Ul 



OESCRIPTI0N 

VwhIm UHF Turn. Model UE8 A56F 
Pnnrtad Circuil Brwrii. Pre^QiiNad. . , . 

P.C.B. PtnnrtJDmatfrs, 1-ZDK. I-1IC. i 

5-1 OK oami, 7-pietB5 

Reselv Kit U Watt. 5% Carbw F*n 3Z-|MCU 
Penw Traeitoimat. Pflf-VlTVAC. S£C-?4VAC. 
ZSOfiii l.tfi 

P*np| Mounl PolBrfliamttfrt inj KnoOt, 1 - 1 KB T 

and 1-5KAT w/Switdi , . . I.lf 

K't 1 -pa, Data 4-ats. Rajmatwi 2 -pea. Haat 5** 

Elfctttryac C*pat«x ex S-petat 
0«k Capacrav Kn 10 W V 
■maa: Tmnnai Capaoior Kri, 
5-BSptfl 6-rjacas 

Cta) Kt, lenht 2-rjaus 21pkt ^-patt | 
' I Hi i] aaM 1 T37-12 Fernar Tarreal Im 
aata 3 i. af 9M mm 

IX. SocfcrtJ Tai 

aaJ14-ai 

Seaaaa, 4aS~ CM a 

Uk Parts Kit ladaaai HaRtaajt, |t J2 a 22 

Nat r# Baas). Hefts* Wn Ant Tanai. OTOT 

Wta«* 0rian>| Ml Hem jt dn 14} Tefal fHice 



1VTI-SWC 

I JCB1-SWD 

3 3TP7-SWH 

* 4FHS5-SWO 

5 5PT1-SWQ 

i 6PP2-SWD 

7 7SSIA-SWD 

fl 8CE3-5M) 

9 KC33-SWD 

10 lOCT-SMO 

11 11L4-S1HD 

It 12CS-SW0 

T3 13SB-SW 

14 14MI5C-SWD 



nm 

K.tt 

1M 

MM 



IJfl 

IJH 

I4.S5 

1JM5 



4 4FH-31-fWU 

fi 6PP3-PWD 

7 7SS17-PWD 

B BCEl^PWQ 

9 9C02v^P*t) 

10 lOCTVPlHJ 

11 1HS-WW 

« UCS-PW 

13 13SR-PW 

14 V 



15 1SMCI6-FWD Hfiar 



OftCrlirriDM 

Varactor UHF Tuner. Model UES-A56f . 

Printed Circuit Boards PFe-drilad 

PCB PotortiomBUn ^20K, l-.BK, 2-101, 2-SK, 
1-1K, and 1-&0k . |ll pecasi 

flesulBt Kit. HW. 5% 29-pct. Vi W 2-pci . 

Pmwi TnnsfDmier. PRI-llTVAC. SEC-24VAC 

Panei Mpun: PDlenSurMlan and Knobi, 1-IKflT 

end 1 -5KAT with iwilch 

ID i 7-ptV Dinri« 4-pcs. Regufaton 2 -par 
Tiamictiifi 2-pa, Heat Seect 2-pts - . . 

EiaEtnayrjc Capaotor Kr3. 14-pieco 

Caranc Dtsa Casadtar K"n 50 WV. 2Cupa . . . 

VanEai Ceidbc Tiaronef Cspkciw 
S-ESpId ^pacn. 

W Kit llrahs ^pts, 22#iAt 1-pace |pneiaai 
fdocnrj) vd 2 T37-12 Hoik Tared cores 

Mtt 6 ft. #21 emt. 

C Sadalts. Tm aist. 1 jm 4-ses. 14 p» 1-pc 

Bad IS eat Z-po 

Eadaswa edk PM SaaaKar aad rH*-*aad 
B ttrpend bar aasaaaai PES aai JUai Taaaa - . 
iaaaL Parle aH radaaa* Ihajeajt, {t*2. %m 
Han eftdb). Maahap mm. Saatsr , fcaL Tanai 

14-po aad S** 
2-peiat ...... 

(1-ltJ, Taral Prtta 



PRICE 

»24.a& 

in a?. 






n 95 

5.95 



1.H 

7,t6 

4H 



1H 

1435 

■ Jf 

7t5 

153 iS 



CUSTOMER NOTICE: 



BUY VVITH CONFIDENCE BEWARE OF LOW QUALITY IMITATORS, Alto* 
our hits consist of New, 1st Class. RF Quality, Parts Engineered for Optimum 

OperatiOA, not factory second* or stock ciose-Out* We service veur completed kits thai you've purchased and buifL You will 

never get stuck, wrth a HAG OF PARTS when ordering from Simple S'-n^n 



SIMPLE SIMON ELECTRONIC KITS, " Inc. 

3S71 S Valley View. Suite 12. Dapt. 7. Las Vegas. NV 89103 

In Nevada Call 70Z"0/ I ""2892 

1-800-782-3716 



WBTTt FDR 

aiuuiTTTY Discouirrs 



Outside Nevada Call: 



Available by Mail Order Onfy 
Send Checfc* or Money Order. Minimum 
Order. $16.95. Add 10% Shipping and 
Handhng on orders under S40-00- for 
orders over S40.00. add 5%. Minimum 
Shipping and Handling $2,00 Cat. SI .00 
— VISA and Mastercard Acceptable — 

*Q»*cfc Otders Will be heJd 30 days before lapping 



SB 






73 Magazine » January, 1983 37 



* Technical Forums 

* ARRL and FCC Forums 

* GIANT 2-day Flea Market 

Saturday and Sunday 
it New Products and Exhibits 

* Grand Banquet 

* Women's Activities 

* Home- Brew Equipment 

Forum 

* Special Gro up M eet i ngs 
it YL Forum 

* Personal Computers Forum 
it CW Proficiency Awards 

* Amateur of Year Award 

* Special Achievement 

Awards 




APRIL 29, 30, MAY 1, 1983 

Hara Arena and Exhibition Center — Dayton, Ohio 



Meet your amateur radio friends from all over the world at the internationally 
famous Dayton HAMVENT10N. 

Seating will be limited for Grand Banquet and Entertainment on Saturday 
evening so please make reservations early. Banquet speaker is Bill Leonard, 
W2SKE, former president of CBS News. 

[f you have registered within the last 3 years you will receive a brochure in late 
February. If not write Box 44, Dayton, OH 45401 . 

Nominations are requested for Radio Amateur of the Year and Special Achievement Awards. Nomination forms are 
available from Awards Chairman, Box 44, Dayton, OH 45401, 

For special motel rates and reservations write to Hamvention Housing, 1406 Third National Bldg,, Dayton, OH 45402, 
NO RESERVATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED BY TELEPHONE. 

All other inquiries write Box 44, Dayton, OH 45401 or phone (513) 849-1720, 

Admission: $7.50 in advance, $9.00 at door. (V&lid for all 3 days} 

Banquet; $14 in advance, $16 at door. 

Flea Market Space: $15 in advance, (\klid for both days) 

Make checks payable to Dayton HAMVENTION, Box 2205 t Dayton, OH 45401 , 

Bring your family and enjoy a great weekend in Dayton, Sponsored by the Dayton Amateur Radio Association, Inc. 



Hv-Gam .Ante nrvai a 
TH7DXS 7 element triband beam - 
TH5HK2S 5 element triband beam 
TH3MH3S 3 element triband beam 
TH3Jr£ 750W PEP 3 el tribander 
TH2HM3S 2 element triband beam 
TH6 to TH7DXS conversion kit — 



205BAS 20m 5 element "Long John 1 " 
155BAS 15m 5 element "Long John* 
105BAS 10m 5 element "Long John" 
18AVT7WBS 60-lOm trap vertical - 
14AVQ/WB5 40-iOm trap vertical - 

V25 2m coiinear gun vertical 

BN-86S Beam mount 1:1 balun 



374.00 

309, OP 

215.00 

I54.0fi 

134.00 

135,00 

292.00 

175. 0C 

114.00 

87.50 

51 .00 

37.50 

17,00 



THE ANTENNA HANK 

646QH General Green Way 

Alexandria, Virginia 22312 

703-569-1200 

All prices subject to change without notice 



Full line available at big laving*' 



Hv-Qain Crank-UD_Tower! 



H&-33HT2 Side supported 

HG-35HT2 Side supported 

HG-50WT2 Side supported 

HQ-37SS Self-supporting 

HG-525S Self -support! rig 

HG^54HD Self-supporting 

HG-70HD Self-supporting 

CranKups freight prepaid in continental US 



Hustler 

5BTV e0-i0m vertical 

4BTV40-l0m vertical 

G7-144 2m coiinear vertical - 
G6-144B 2m coiinear vertical 

MO- 1,2 HF mobile masts 

FH-10 itfm resonator 

RH-15 15m resonator 

PM-20 2fldi resonator 

RH-4G 40m resonator 

FH-75 75m resonator 

RH-60 &0m resonator 

BH-I Bumper mount 

SSH-2 S.S. ball mount 

HOT^Hustloff 1 " mount - 



► 744. QQ 
546,00 
754.00 
642.00 
923. OB 
1500,00 
2351 .00 



Rohn Towers 

2GG 10 -ft section 

20 AGO too section 

25G 10 ft section 

25AGO top section 

45G 10 ft section 

45AGU top section 

BX49 6 sq ft max 

HBX48 10 sq ft max 

HDBX48 IS sq ft max — 
FK254S 48 ft foldover - 
FK4544 44 ft foldover - 



Cushcraft A ri -teriri 

A4 4 element triband beam 

A3 3 element triband beam 

f?3 Gain triband vertical 

AV5 80-10m trap vertical 

AV4 40^10m trap vertical 

AV3 20-i0m trap vertical 



s 



% 29.50 

32 . 75 

41.00 

53,50 

93.75 

1&4.75 

204.00 

253.00 

316.00 

794.00 

1117.00 



32-H I? element 2m "Boomer* — 
214B 14 element 2m " Jr Boomer" - 

214 FB 14 el*meM FH "Jr Boomer" 
Al 47^11 11 element 2m beam 



A144H0T 10 element 2m twist beam 
Full line available at great savings! 



Rotor 



224.50 
172.50 
224.50 
38.50 
81.50 
44.20 
Bl ■ 50 
6B.00 
68,00 
37.50 
44. 20 



SF-2 2m 5/8 mobile whip — 
Entire line at super savings' 



100,00 
7?, 00 
99.00 

46.00 

18,50 

9.00 

9,00 

12.00 

13,75 

14.75 

14,75 

13.00 

14.00 

14*00 

9. SO 



Diawa/ M ill&r 

CS-201 2 way coax switch 

CS-40I 4 way coax switch 

CH-520 HF SWR/Power meter 

CN-54G VHF SWR/Power meter 

CN-55& UHF EWHVPower meter 

CH-620B HF/VHF SWR/Power meter 
CK-720B HF/VHF SWR/Power meter 

CHW-41S auto tuner /meter 

CKW-51S auto tuner/meter 



HDP-300 Digital readout 25 sq ft 

T2X "Tailtwister* 20 sq ft 

HAM-IV 15/7.5 sq ft 

CD-45 8.5/5 5q ft 

AB-22XL 3/1.5 sq ft 



J 



20.00 

62.00 

59.00 

69.00 

74.00 

107.00 

150.00 

168.00 

285,00 



HD-73 Dual speed 10*7 sq ft 

U-100 ApproK* 3 sq ft 

8 cond rotor cable 

6 cond rotor cable 

4 conri rotor cable 



427.00 

244. 0G 

195.00 

L02.75 

49.95 

89,00 

42.00 

■li/ft 

.15/f t 

,075/1 t 



M irn — Product s 
HQ-i "Mini-Quad" 6,i0*15 r 20ro 
B-24 ,h Hini-Beam" 4,J0,J3,20m 
RK-3 3rd element for B-24 — 



129,95 

99.00 
67.00 



MF J Enterprise s 

HFJ-900 200 Watt Versa Tuner 

MFJ-941C 300 watt Versa Tuner II 

HFJ-94*B30& watt Versa Tuner II 

HFJ-962 1500 watt Versa Tuner 111 — 
Other KFJ products at similar savings! 



41-95 

77.55 

117.35 

193*15 



ORDERS ONLY: £00-334-8473 

ALL others call; {703)569-1200 

No COD - We ship UPS 

Allow two weeks for delivery 

Shipping cost not included 

We reserve the right to limit quantities 

We gladly except VISA and MASTERCARD 



Coax AficJ Wire 
RG-213/u Hilspec 95% shield 

RG-8/u "Superflest" foam 

Mini-tl foam 



RG-58/u "Superfle*" foam 

#14 standed copper 50,75 ii00*or 150 ft 
#J4 to&perweld 50 ft raultiples 



.28/ft 
.24/ft 
■ 12/-H 
,12/ft 
.05/ft 
.075/ft 



36 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



SPEEDC ALL'S NEW #3 1 2 TOUCH-TONE DECODER 
ENDS RADIO BACKGROUND "CHATTER" FOREVER. 







^PP^S* 



LOW COST COMMERCIAL GRADE KIT! 
EASY TO ASSEMBLE COMPACT UNIT! 
STATE-OF-THE-ART FLEXIBILITY! 



Speedcatl Corporation, with 20 years of reliability and 
know-how in the Mobile Radio Industry, now offers 
the Model 31 2K; a unique, low-cost DTMF selective 
call Touch- Tone® Decoder, It's specialty designed m 
kit form for radio buffs, with all of the quality and 
performance that made Speedcall #1 in signaling! 




To order, send check or money order to: 

DEPARTMENT "K* 

SPEEDCALL 

CORPORATION 





2020 P*uHir.i-Nil Avenue ■ Havward, California 94545 

(California Residents add 6% Sales Tax) 



No more annoying background chatter, no more 
missed calls. At last it's possible for individuals and 
repeater groups to have their own personal and 
emergency touch-tone DTMF network! And you 
may use all 16 touch-tone digits to expand your 
selection of formats and permit special control 
applications. 



W# mcxmpi ViSK **C 
COD. CHECK or MO 



FIRST QUALITY COMPONENTS- NOT MAIL ORDER "SECONDS 



Mirt order Si 0-00 -add 
S** Shpg and %^ 00 in% 



ARIES ZERO 

INSERTION 

FORCE 

SOCKETS - 



i ,uri Hi:lu3t&d.T'Utff urn insertion 

i.ri pitied so<dei iajI runs - 
capaWe 01 being plugged mio 

dip ^OChefS in*, ludimj *np ATSJ.i 




MOSS ** 

11Q54 a 

tlOST *0 

MOM ft* 



1 ?* IS SO 

I 4 » 1 ) tO I160 
* So * Q5 a7S 
tH 3 15 * « 

id so 4 *3 a to 



RESISTOR ASSORTMENT Bison - too ex* > i «eHtata 

S*Ck> No B2S01 lO« of 1*13 IS tft-23-27-33-3^47 SSOhM 

Stock No B3502 10 aa a* 68 62 t Or> 1 3(M SO-1 BO-220-?ro-33O-.39O QHM 

Sloth No H2&D3 10 ■« or 470-560 SaO-SJO 1K 1 2K 1 SKI BK 2 2K 2 7 OHM 

SToch No 02504 10 en of 3.3K 3.9K4 7K-5 BK-6.B.KB 2K fOK 1 2K 1SK1BHOHM 

Slock NO B25G5 10 en oi 22K 27* IIJK 14K fl 7K S&ft 60* &ZK 1 OOK 1 20* OHM 

Stock No 92506 ID en oM SDK 1 BOK ??OK 27DK 330k<3^K-4 7QK 560K btlUK B20KOHM 

Slock Nd B250? ID pb vt IM-1 2 Ml 5M 1 BM-2 2M 2 ?M 1 1M-3 9M4 7M-b 6MQHM 



WILD ROVER 

f oucn «wntn capful* 
OffPsKn^ nmfion ■> Q05 mlhout !t» 
jfc* o» i levered am fttirwftf *a*i on 
i"d gtt wrtti lor rxn« Norma** opr- 
'*r«it5V*2 F 6amp->DPnk«QriCTrftv 

Mtintie- E1 5 raffed Br leomciL 

StecaMo. 1-» 10 » 

1 TOM f Wit MJ 3 95 




ELPAC POWER SUPPUES - DC/DC CONVERTERS 




60.40 ROSIN CORE SOLDER 





•'■UTtC 
4t«fc Mo 



1.1*1 1 ft 


CSJ9P1 


i»at 


CSJB11 


13*17 


ceiao? 


*j*i* 


CB3E1? 


C*t*14 


* at •"¥•(!" 




IW 


CuHOri 


tw> 


BftJaai 



Hid f taear o 1 ** 

:z:.:: $1095° 



iBkai 



|W(KI 
3 0- r ,, 

li»T I. 

*&f B 
*•>?* 

*»* a 

1«IA 



UwHtur 

VOCI 
HJlli F 
IJtCH 
lfl»f 

itio r 

wo » 

tfr** 

■ art * 
**r» * 

MM * 

»!■ * 



Qurpirl 
«A| 

ft. 24 

"-?■ 

(HO 



rjunai-piri'i 
iMlWlQl 

in tni !'»■ 
4iji *li3 0? 

U» *' *■ 1 M 

Hiaiiioa 

•** pi >>i "tt 

Mill }H tt 

*»)H »■' Tr 

aa** 1 i*' rr 



' iaj* i D4n^HiETPti#(k: ot COpp^EtTrraa 



t 95 
T 15 



:-- Sri 

1**9 

.i -- 

3i 



Special of the Month! 




$75 



nti H^pna/vv 



OIGfTAL MULTIMETER 
Smyl& rOtafy Switch gpera- 
in in La^e.tasy 'o iead 5 
3-'f d<grt display 800 tiours 
opera I mg I if r- w j I H smgle 9 v 
batlery Sevef> lunctions— 
IOC Volts. DC Amp* Qruns 
AC Volts AC Amps 0»ode 
,i"dResrs!o' Junc!>on Aud- 
**«■ CcHT.T'noiiv Cr^e 

Stoca. No CarTpp'aj c**v «*m 
B250* g? 50 



MODUTEC 




ELPAC POWER SUPPLIES - SOLV SERIES FULLY REGULATED 

Output Hiirirti"n«ini 

^LPAC Oifrpul Currflnl IhHWiPI 

Part Nh» vriM*ij»i nilmg inppiLl-.pi Mill' Price 

saWM-l i 3 o* •'' lap'fJ NiM«NniaaM mmi 

StHV'lU If T 5A * f 1*HiJ F nag) mi lydari MM 

SOtVll ll Tt 111 * f 1***l3 fi*#*mHur1nP M84 

SOUrio*. 1 <Q1 iWriiiiini Dvn Mi; 

Mlvxm? 13 ana liartru] n 0**>a h»* 

SDivafria tt 13* tiM'Mirt 




PIN FORMING TOOL 



r -h 



puis iC's on iheir l rue row to row spacing. One 
side is for .300 center a F I >p too I ove r for d e vices 
ori 600 ceniefs Pul device <n locil 
squeeze 

ONE TOOL DOES & Thfu 4C PINS! 

Stock No. 1 1 059 $ 1 2 - 95 



>K MACHtN E AND TOOL ■■— 

IC INSERTION/ 

EXTRACTION KIT 

InduOn t3&* fC «- iV *. Il« pTPd 
rtHfite*5 fc-aci^mrhnum *1 IC* 
> - ri ho 40 gm TuV)r% War 

1. VTo s-flft Jiii.1 iiii 'i.'ii 1 . 

•■"■I ■** Sloch *lo •QT 1 74 





SOCKET WRAP IO 



pradfiDlvi nftp' 



MOnO la .L*pnhP t t-r, v A-ac 

IfienrpTJ N«f jl'_* IC PJrT 

-nbpr h»<Kliprxatt: EUnl l, ''•* 5 

I, J ^.r- -hi.l|i|-H.'J |J(h||** 
,n, ., -ini] |Pj ■ |4|J|Lll 

$1,82 per pack 



tun 

tin? 

11MQ 
l.LSDi 
TM03 



ttl 
fO 1 

:*! 
*0l 




IC EXTRACTOR 

One-piece, spring steel con- 
struction. Will extract ail LSI. MSI 
and SSL devices with Q to 24 



Stock No. 
13313 



$2.10 




MimclampAC Volt-Am meter 

allows singing one conductor oul o^ 
fnany Wrthout disarrangement 

Slock No At" amperes Price 

1273C f>35A $3- 

13731 0-50A J9 50 

13732 O'lOOA 19 SO 

ACCESSORY LINE SPLITTER 
allows fast readings of *C power con- 
sumption pf piug m eQuipment with- 
out separation o* leads 

Stock No 13727 S3- 5 



POCKET SIZED 
BATTERY TESTER 
for all lypes of sma 
35* t0 4.Sv 

Stock no »3>33 



batteries from 

$13p 95 

VOLTI CATOR 

automotive diagnostic meler plugs 
into Itghtef socket and indicates hal- 
lery condition and charging rates 

Slock No 13736 $1 5.^5 

AC VOLTAGE TESTER 

plugs into any 1 1 Qv service necepl- 

ah*e to check time voltage over 50- 

StOCfc No 13735 $1 4. 95 

VOM-MULTITESTER 

versatile Voft-Ohm-Miliiammeter in 

small package g5 

Stock No. 13729 $1 3. 



Drawer Q Milford 
CO. NJ 08848-9990 





TOLL 800-526-5960 

in N J (201)996-4093 



a:t3 



*^ti2 

Send lor Free Catalog 
over 1 1 00 parts 



■«*See ifSJf of Advert tiers on page 114 



73 Magazine * January, 1983 39 



The Forgetful 
Autodialer Puzzle 

Even Sherlock couldn't figure out how to make an 
autodialer that reprograms with no hardware changes, 

Elementary, says dear Batie. 



Howard F. Batie W7BBX 
12002 Cheviot Drive 
Herndon VA 22070 





Photo A, 
40 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



Among some autodialer 
designs for 2-meter 
mobile autopatch use, a 
common limitation has 
been a lack of program- 
ming flexibility. 1 2 < 3 Al- 
though it is much easier to 
design and implement a di- 
ode-logic or PROM scheme 
for storing phone numbers, 
changing or adding a tele- 
phone number can be quite 
inconvenient for hard-wired 
systems or PROM-based 
designs, In this design, pro- 
gramming is done directly 
from the tone-encoder 
keyboard and allows pro- 
gramming of up to eight 
phone numbers. Numbers 
which are not programmed 
can be dialed directly from 
the keyboard in the normal 
manner. 

The primary disadvan- 
tage of a RAM-based design 
is the requirement to con- 
tinuously power the RAM 
to overcome its volatility, 
However, when you consid- 
er that an ample power 
source is available at both 
places in which an autodial- 
er has a real application 
(your car and the shack), the 
disadvantage is more than 
offset by the ability to 



re pro gram the memories 
very quickly and easily. 
Since the circuit described 
here has a total continuous 
current drain of only about 
45 mA from a 12-IS-volt 
source, it may be connect- 
ed directly to the car bat- 
tery without fear of running 
it down, since cars usually 
do not sit idle for weeks at a 
Lime, if complete discon- 
nection is necessary, each 
phone number can be re- 
programmed as quickly as 
the phone number can be 
manually dialed. 

The RAM used was care- 
fully selected after consid- 
ering all available CMOS 
and bipolar memories; the 
logic support circuitry was 
then designed to meet the 
needs of the RAM. The 
most important constraints 
were that the RAM have bi- 
directional input/output 
lines and that these lines be 
tri-state. These requirements 
were necessary in order to 
significantly reduce the cir- 
cuit complexity and cost 
while still permitting the 
keyboard to be used manu- 
ally without affecting the 
stored phone numbers. Of 
secondary importance, it 
was desired that the RAM 



be organized 8 bits wide to 
allow direct interface with 
the seven data lines of a 
3X4 keyboard matrix. The 
RAM selected was the 
Texas Instruments TMS 
4036 since it met all of 
these requirements. 

Description 

Fig. 1 shows the com- 
plete autodialer schematic; 
connections to the trans- 
ceiver are shown in Fig, 2. 
The autodialer memory 
holds up to eight numbers 
of up to seven digits each (* 
and # count as digits); there- 
fore, the number actually 
stored may be either a stan- 
dard 7-digit telephone 
number or an autopatch ac- 
cess code of from 1 to 7 
digits in length. The total 
number of phone numbers 
in memory is a function of 
the RAM organization, in 
this case 64 x 8. With selec- 
tion of a different RAM, 
more or fewer telephone 
numbers could be stored. 
For example, if the RAM or- 
ganization were128 X8, six- 
teen phone numbers could 
be stored, Eight 8-bit words 
are required to completely 
store each 7-digit telephone 
number. 

Inclusion of D2 and D3 
drops the voltage supplied 
to the RAM from +5.0 volts 
down to about +3.5 volts. 
This decreases the current 
required by the entire auto- 
dialer from 65 mA to about 
40-45 mA. Reliable data re- 
tention Is maintained with 
this RAM as long as the Vcc 
pin remains above +2,8 
volts dc 

In addition to direct pro- 
gramming from the encod- 
er keyboard, other features 
of the autodialer include a 
speed control to vary the 
rate of readout, an on- 
board audio amplifier to al- 
low you to hear the tones 
sent to the transceiver, a 
visual indication to aid in 
both programming and 
readout, and a minimum 
number of controls. The 
autodialer may also be 
used as a "standard" tone 
encoder to manually dial 



x 







9 fl 



J I 



i hi 400 1 



-Lei 



I 50 



Ul 
LM340T5 



1 



C? 

50 



J i 



.C3 -±*C4 

T-oj T.oi 



D3 03 * 35V 

IN400K2J A 



f-tf — w- 



+ 5V 
-J 



fir 1 



.000 M Hi 



J:2M 



13 



03 

MCI44I0P 



13 



HEVIN 



SFKfl OUT 



+ 5V 



TONES OUT 



S 



COM 



DIAL — J — SI 

a p 



PROGRAM 



&a 



SELECT 



S3 



LED I 



10 



\2 



ill 



22 



20 



21 
27 



if; 



K. 



15 



i*5 



28 



29 



30 

25 



23 



24 



Pfi 



#5V 
A 



ROW I 



ROW Z 



ROW 3 



n(y* 4 



RIO 
K 



■ ;ri 
'■-to 



~L 



COL 



£C-LU 



CflL 3 [ 



14 



13 



I.BK 



C5 10 



12 II 



fl5 



J 25' 

>R7 fh MO 



*>I00K 
I xCvfl 
AUDIO LEVEL 




C6 
.001 

-)f- 



lmsbo-ns 



R6 

25 K 

MON. VOLUME 



1 \ r 



5 



a 



40-42P 



■■i 



13 



I 



IB 




20 



js 



7 



10 



II 



40MB o 



Jfl 





+ 3 

i 


SV 

L 






t5 


D6 


+ 


A 2 


D5 




An 


[>7 




41 


D4 

DO 
tit 


Lib 
TM5. 
4036 
ML 


A3 


ai 




A1 


D5 






AS 



2 



3 



ce or r/w 




i^ 



IF. 



j- 



07 
2 2 



680K 



u+o 
4528B 



i.< 



s Rlf 

>I0K 



L^yx^ 



/77 



5V 
4 



j- R| 3 

: : i-qk :^C9 




6 -TL 



i? 



P3 U9 qo 

02 
03 (JO 

g! do 



yi 



I c 



LI 



1J" 



ii 



l£ 



10 



ft* 



CB 
.01 



rtt 



19 



R9 * 

680ft f 



Ik VW 



Ii 



r Q a 



AC 



LJ 4 b 

432S0 



c c 



401 IB 



fj^yj 



10 



13 



+ 5V 



IZ 



QO 
■3 1 
OS 
01 



UIO 
40248 



MR CP 



CIO 

.01 



'■2 



IS 




RI3 



40aiB 



15 



RI6 
680 K 



14 



AC 



UBfr 
a 4^2Bb 



tn 



i. 



m 



en 

,01 



r^H' 



7 



5 



| I 



+5V 

u 

sir 

&8QK 



PC 



: Q 452BB 



i. 



li 






Fig. 1. Schematic diagram. 



phone numbers or access 
codes which are not pro- 
grammed directly into the 
memories. 

Operation 

Selection of one of the 
eight stored phone numbers 
is accomplished by depress- 
ing the appropriate key- 
board digit (1-8) while hold- 
ing down the SELECT push- 
button, S3, This action 
latches the logic state of 



three RAM address lines 
(A(X A1 , and A2), and is used 
to select the desired phone 
number location for either 
autodial readout or pro- 
gramming. The selected 
phone number will then be 
available until a new one is 
selected; neither manual 
operation of the keyboard 
nor autodialing the stored 
phone number will alter the 
selection of the phone 
number. 



To program the autodial- 
er, the phone number digits 
are keyed in on the tone en- 
coder keyboard with the 
PROGRAM push-button, 
S2, held down. This action 
routes the U8b output pulse 
produced by each key- 
board digit depression to 
the clock input of the 
counter, U10. When each 
digit key is depressed, LED1 
will light for about half a 
second; when it goes out, 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 41 



DflAKE Tft-SSC 



P*D-B 




•JEW TO-I74/U 

o::::r~_v.-i > 



MIKE 
POT 



'.-: * 




AF AMP 




HE* JACK 
INSTALLED 



J, 



3=HI»" 



X* 



en 



/7? 



NEW 



*I3 EVd 
J? 



^-a=£ 



-•-m 



crea:±: 



^> 



RFC I 



NICADS D«& 

Hi|'hr-«- 



*4 *— • 

• — i 1 — • 




N - 1j t 



X 



1DNE£ OUT 



TO SPEAKER 



+ I36V IN 



Fig. 2. Typical transceiver connection detail. 



that digit has been pro- 
grammed in and the next 
digit may be programmed. 
If only four digits are to be 
programmed (as in an ac- 
cess code}, they are keyed 
in in the same manner. 

Then, after the last digit 
has been entered, tap the 
DIAL push-button, SI , while 
keeping the PROGRAM 
button down. This activates 
the clock and steps the ad- 
dress counter, U10 r through 
the remaining memory ad- 
dresses for the selected 
phone number. Whatever 
information may have been 
stored previously in the lat- 
ter part of the 8-digit memo- 
ry segment is automatically 
erased The LED will light 
up while the clock cycles 
through the unused digits; 
when it goes out (or when 
all the digits have been en- 
tered into the memory), re- 



lease the PROGRAM push- 
button, and the memory is 
ready to be autodialed 

To read out (autodial) a 
phone number, simply se- 
lect the phone number you 
want and press the DIAL 
push-button, SI, LED! will 
light up during the autodial- 
ing sequence; when it goes 
out. the number has been 
completely autodialed. 

In the manual mode, the 
tri-state memory data lines 
are always in the high-im- 
pedance OFF state; the key- 
board activates the tone en- 
coder, U3, and the encoder 
tones are fed directly to the 
transmitter mike input 
Since the autodialer is al- 
ways ready to dial a phone 
number manually (except 
when programming or dur- 
ing autodial readout), a sep- 
arate manual/ autodial 





MCVR , 






PAO-H 


i 

l 


[ 


r\ 




h>r~i- 










L*n , r 










i 




\j 




ITT 






EH 







Fig. 3. Connection as shown for Fig, 2. Power is derived from 

transceiver and transceiver speaker is used for monitor 

42 73 Magazine * January. 1983 



^/ 



/ft 



switch or other control is 
not necessary. 

It should be noted that 
this design specifically 
omits an automatic push- 
to-talk (PTT) line activation 
feature. While this feature 
is very useful for a manual- 
only tone encoder or an 
autodialer having only a 
PROM-based scheme for 
storage of phone numbers, 
incorporation into a key- 
board-programmable auto- 
dialer based on a RAM de- 
sign is actually undesirable. 
In a ROM-based scheme, 
the manual keyboard is 
used only for dialing unpro- 
grammed numbers; how- 
ever, in a key board -pro- 
grammable RAM-based 
scheme such as this one, 
the keyboard serves two ad- 
ditional functions — selec- 
tion of the phone number 
to be autodialed and pro* 
gramming of the actual dig- 
its This also eliminates pan- 
el clutter by making addi- 
tional controls unneces- 
sary; Inclusion of the auto- 
matic PTT feature on a key- 
board-programmable auto- 
dialer would activate the 
transmitter when selecting 
or programming a phone 
number. This is undesirable 
and was avoided, allowing 
off-the-air phone number 
selection, programming, 
and autodial readout moni- 
toring. The microphone 
PTT switch is used in the 
normal manner to key the 
transceiver for both speak- 
ing and for autodialing. 

Construction 

A conscious effort was 
made to keep the overall 
size of the finished auto- 
dialer to the minimum nec- 



essary, so that installation 
in the car would not be ham- 
pered by a bulky cabinet. A 
large and expensive multi- 
deck rotary switch for phone 
number selection was elimi- 
nated from an earlier de- 
sign, as was an internal 
monitor speaker. The final 
PC board design and layout 
now incorporates keyboard- 
selection of the phone num- 
bers and still retains the on- 
board audio amplifier to 
permit monitoring the en- 
coder tones in the speaker 
of your transceiver 

The requirement for 
bulky panel controls in an 
earlier project 4 has been 
eliminated by incorporat- 
ing the panel control func- 
tions within the logic de- 
sign. The result is a very 
compact unit which retains 
all the necessary features. A 
standard LMB enclosure 
(CR-531) was chosen, based 
on its smalt size and neat 
appearance, and the PC 
board was laid out to con- 
form to it. 

The PC board itself mea- 
sures 2W" X5V4 " (6.35 
cm x 13.34 cm), is of top- 
quality commercial-grade 
G-10/FR-4 material, is dou- 
ble-sided with plated- 
th rough holes, and contains 
all of the components re- 
quired except the three 
panel push-buttons, the in- 
put/output jack, and the 
LED. Connection to all pan- 
el controls is eased by pro- 
viding all required logic and 
power signals to a central 
location on the PC board; a 
ribbon cable can then be 
used to interconnect the PC 
board with the panel con- 
trols. All panel, signal, and 
panel-control lines are also 
available at the dual, 1 5-pin 
edge-connector fingers on 
the PC board (0.15673.96 
mm spacing). By laying out 
the PC board in this fashion, 
maximum flexibility is af- 
forded for selection of any 
convenient-sized cabinet 
or, if desired, the panel con- 
trols can be remoted. entire- 
ly from the autodialer PC 
board through an edge con- 
nector. 



apple 



MORE FOR YOUR MONEY. 



-.^. 



.. 






TERMINALL is a hardware and software 
system thai converts your personaf corrv 
puter into a State of the art comrounica 
tions terminal, Terminal! features simple 
Connections to your computer and radio 
js sophisticated and reliable software 

Simplicity 

TERMINALL was designed from the 
outset to be easy to connect to your radio 
and easy 10 use. Ptug into your receiver 
headphone jack and copy Morse Code or 
radioteleiyp© (RTTY). Plug into your CW 
key jack and send Morse Code. Attach a 
microphone connector and send Baudot 
ASCII RTTY using a runes (AFSK). 

That's all There is to hooking it ui 

The software is loaded into your ec Jier 

m disk of cassette Enier your calla 
and the lime and you will star! receiving 
immediately. No .settings or adjustments 
are necessary to receive Morse Code, it's 
fully automatic -and it nay 

tyrje your message w> receiving or 
transmitting. 

You will be on the air. receiving and 
nsmitting in any mode, in minutes As 
we sad. TERMINALL is simple, 

More for your money. 

■ TERMINALL has the RTTY terminal 
unit - demod and AFSK built m. This 
results in a lower total cost 

■ Fantastic Morse reception, Six 

stage active filter demodulator copies the 
weak ones Auto adaptive Morse 
algorithm copies the sloppy ones. Reel- 
ed code speed displayed on states tine 

■ Outstanding documentation. Pro 
fesssonaHy written, 90 page user manual 

ts step by-step rnstructioita 

■ Built in, separate, multi-stage, ac- 
tive fitter RTTY and CW demodulators. 
No phase lock loops. RTTY demoduis 
has 170 and either 425 or 850 Hz shift- 



keyboard selectable - and uses either the 
panel meter or scope outputs for easy tun- 
ing Copy the weak ones. Copy the noi- 
ones Copy the fading ones 

■ Built in crystal controlled AFSK. 

Rock stable for even the most demanding 
VHF or HF applications. A must on many 
VHF RTTY repeaters, 

■ Built in 110 or 220 voJl AC power sup- 
ply 

■ Built in parallel printer driver soft- 
ware, S / attach a parallel ASCII 
printer teg EPSON MX-60J to your 
printer port to obtain hardcopy in all 
modes 

■ Multi level displays - allows examin- 
ing and editing of historical text, 

■ Word wrapping, word mode editing, 
diddle/ ignore carnage returns, user pro- 
grammable end of line sequence, ad- 
stable carriage width, multiple usex- 

defrned WRU, itansmit delay (fixed, none 



NO COMPROMISE HARDWARE. 



* s (* 



TiSSS; 



ifc* 



rM 



I 



imi 



or auto adaptive), break mode and more! 

■ The all-in-one TERMINALL design 

makers It great for use on INI or VHF, Ham., 
Commercial, SWL or ''MAR'S ■ SWL's. 
TERM I MALL may be jumpered for either 
425 or 850 Hz reception to copy news and 
weather services 



Day Monev Back Trial Period iwt Factory Direct Orders 

System Requirements 

TERMMALLT1 Cprnrtmn i«u«|Jiri5 ' \\ '•" ti$ r HS SCJ Model l B^ffCS a Mcwtal i rR£ -80, l&K HAM $$& 

I .•-«.■■! ;i bASh In ■■.■rwi-' ..ii ■ u ■ ■ : ii il attd fested li.n l-A-.m- ,i>ij an wtO'i tivi -i %ii'-.ic 

Hon mahtfaj 8499. 

TERMINALL T3 ( i H Awtoi III fteiq l«l Ml Tft5-£0. 16K ft A' 

MM 

TERMINALL T2 Con *^AF ; L£ U PLuS ioXflAM 

■;gs 
wwWed > mart*, i *49Si 

Add *4.00 sftECHxrtg U P S reg de&very CA tandems add 6% m*w i**. 

TO ORDER (209) 634-8888 or 667-2888 

We ere experiencing telephone dJrffcuJLies, Pteese keep tryimg, 

AUCROTRONICS, inc. 

112S N. Golden State Blvd 

Turfock, California 95380 ^44 

>.ned Tradem • I irp 

Apple © i Rs j<^rnstic tjl Apple Cc-*t^Dsj!l : 

- 



iTujictr ctwgt. 



The communications terminal that does it all! 



1 



xtvti 



1 



i 



P 



^ 



pad-s 



CAR PADfO 



^ 



f rg* 4. Autodialer power is derived directly from car battery; 
transceiver speaker is used for monitor, 



Installation and Adjustment 

Autodialer interconnec- 
tions to your 2-meter trans* 
ceiver include the +13,6- 
volt supply line, tone en- 
coder output, and the audio 
amplifier output; these 
should be shielded between 
the autodialer and trans- 
ceiver as shown in Fig. 2. 
The TONE jack on the rear 
of my Drake TR-33C was re- 
plated with an audio DIN 
jack. Although a six-pin jack 
was used (for possible fu- 
ture access to other parts of 
the transceiver], only the 
three lines mentioned 
above plus ground are re- 
quired by the autodialer. 

The supply line can be 

run to a + 13.6-volt source 
separate from the trans- 
ceiver, if desired, permit- 
ting use of a standard 2 -wire 
shielded mike case be- 
tween the autodialer and 
transceiver. The autodialer 
tone-encoder output is ex- 
tended through a short 
piece of RC-174/U to the 
transceiver microphone 
jack; the coax shield need 
not be grounded at the 
mike-jack end The audio 
amplifier, U2, is connected 
directly to the transceiver 
speaker; normal transceiver 
audio is not affected and 
this arrangement eliminates 
the need for a separate 
speaker. The wire to the 
speaker inside the trans- 
ceiver cabinet need not be 
shielded. The tone encoder 
output can be interfaced di- 
rectly with either low-im- 
pedance microphone in- 
puts (e.g., TR-33C) or with 

high-impedance inputs 

(eg,, the Heath HW-2036A). 

Only three adjustments 

are necessary for proper 

44 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



operation of the autodialer 
The speed is set by R12 to 
give a total autodial dura- 
tion of about one second 
for all seven digits. The tone 
encoder output level into 
the transceiver microphone 
input is adjustable by R7. If 
a deviation meter is avail- 
able, the tone-encoder out- 
put may be set to yield a de- 
viation of about 4.5 kHz 
when any keyboard digit is 
held down 

Alternatively, the level 
may be adjusted by ear 
with the help of another 
operator on the repeater 
to a point which gives re- 
liable autopatch access and 
dialing operation but which 
does not sound distorted 
(over deviated). The last ad- 
justment is to set the audio- 
amplifier output level to 
give a comfortable and uri- 
distorted speaker volume 
under road conditions R7 
is the trimmer which does 
this. If the external audio 
monitor is not desired, R5, 
R6, C5, C6, and U2 can be 
eliminated altogether. 

Final Notes 

The addition of the auto- 
dialer described here has 
made a great improvement 
in the ease and enjoyment 
of using the local auto- 
patch repeaters and has 
certainly decreased the risk 
of becoming a potential 
traffic statistic while trying 
to dial a phone number. 
Further, the ability to rapid- 
ly and conveniently pro- 
gram or reprogram phone 
numbers in the memories is 
greatly appreciated, espe- 
cially when access codes 
are changed periodically. In 
addition, performance of 



i 



*CVR , 



■ *■ 



f>0 



ftt 



p 



Kl 



pao-6 



n 



u 



t 



Fig. 5. Autodialer power is derived directly from car battery; 
car radio speaker is used for monitor. 



the autodialer has been ab- 
solutely flawless through- 
out three very cold winters 
and hot summers, and I'm 
looking forward to many 
more years of enjoyable re* 
peater autopatch use with 
this autodialer 

The printed-circuit board 
tor this project and a 
10-page illustrated step-by- 
step assembly manual are 
available from me for 
$10.00 postpaid in the US 
I'll be happy to answer 



questions about the auto- 
dialer, but please intlude 
an SASE.B 

References 

1. Crawford, John, "An Auto- 
matic Dialer for Deluxe Mobile, " 
73, January, 1976. 

2. Lloyd, Bob, "Mobile Autodial- 
er" 73, June, 1976. 

3. McEwan, Eton, "A No-Hands 
Telephone Dialer/ 1 73, January. 
1977. 

4. Batie, Howard, "A Program- 
mable Contest Keyer," Ham Ra- 
dio, April, 1976. 



Parts List, 

C1 — 50-uF, 16-V tantalum 
C2— 5f>uF, 16-V tantalum 
C3— ,01-uF. 16-V disc ceramic 
C4— .01 -uF, 16-V disc ceramic 
C5—1(kiF t 10-V tantalum 
C6— ,001-uF, 16-V disc ceramic 
C7— 2.2-uF T 10-V tantalum 
C8— .01-uF T 16-V disc ceramic 
C9— 4.7-uF, 10-V tantalum 
C1Q— .01-uF t 16-V disc ceramic 
C11— .01-uF, 16-V disc ceramic 
C12— ,Q01-uF T 16-V disc ceramic 

D1-D3— 1N4001 Si rectifier 
J1— MAS-4/MAB-4 (two) 
LED— MV5Q23 or equivalent 



PAM 
Y1— 1.000 MHz crystal 

LMB CR-531 cabinet 

Digit ran KL-0054 keyboard 

IC Sockets: 

8 pin— 2 

14 pin— 8 

16 pin— 4 

20 pin— 1 

#4 Hardware; 
% " bolts— 4 
y 4 * bolts— 4 
Nuts— 16 
Lockwashers— 16 

8" 12-conductor ribbon cable 



S1-S3— SPST mom. push-button {normaHy open) 



U1 — LM340T5, uA7805, etc. (TG-22Q case) 
U2— LM380 (8-pin) Do not substitute 
U3— MC14410P Do not substitute 
U4— MC14528B, CD4528B, etc. 
U5— MCI 4011 B, CD4011B, etc. 
U6— TMS 4036NL Do not substitute 
U7— MC14012B, CD4012B, etc, 
U8— MC14528B, CD4528B, etc. 
U9— MC14Q42B, CD4042B, etc. 
U10— MC14024B, CD4024B, etc. 
U11 — MC14081B, CD4081B, etc. 
U12— MC14001B, CD4001B, etc, 
U13— MC14G01B, CD4001B, etc. 
U14— MC14002B, CD4002B, etc. 
U15— MC14011B, CD4011B, etc. 
U16— NE555V, LM555, etc. 



R1 — 12 meg, V* W 
R2— K8k, V« W 
R3— 2.2k, V« W 
R4, R5-I0k t V* W 
R6— 25k PC trimmer 
R7— 100k PC trimmer 
R8, R9-680k t Va W 
R10, R11-10K, 'A W 
R12— 25k PC trimmer 
R13, R 14— 3.3k, V4 W 
R15— 10k, % W 
R16, R17— 680k, V4 W 



MICROLOG 




I 



SAMVO 



r Wi 




MEMORY BACK-UP 

MAD HIGH SPEED PRINTER OUTPUT* 

vlever Lose Your Memory Again! 

Ml "Here-is" memories, ID'S and all keyboard in- 
)ut parameters are retained for 2 weeks by the in- 
ernal Ni-Cad battery & charging circuit. Load up 
he memories, carry the ACT-1 out to your field-day 
site and be ready to go as if you never turned it 
}ff! Also included in this option package is the 
nigh speed code converted RS-232 serial printer 

DUtput. 

I~he best gets better at MICROLOG Corp. 
18713 Mooney Dr., Gaithersburg, MD 20879 
fel. 301-258-8400 TELEX 908153. 



MICROLOG 



^51 



• SIMPLE DIRECT CONNECTION to your 
Transceiver. • COMPLETE SYSTEM, built-in 
Demodulator & AFSK Modulator with key- 
board programmable tone pairs from 500 to 
3000 Hz. • SPLIT-SCREEN operation with 
keyboard selectable line location • 1400 
character text buffer. • TEN, 40 CHAR, pro- 
grammable message memories (doubles with 
BATT. BACKUP), plus ID'S WRU & SELCALs. 

• RANDOM CODE generator & hand key in- 
put for practice. • Baudot 60 to 132 
WPM. • ASCII 110 & 300 baud. • SYNO 
LOC MODE for improved ASCII operation. 

• RECORDER INTERFACE for "BRAG- 
-TAPE" or recording off-the-air. • CODE 
CONVERTED printer output in Baudot or 
ASCII. • SSTV/GRAPHICS transmit. 

• FULL 63 KEY Computer grade keyboard. 



NNOVATORS IN DIGITAL COMMUNICATION 



*9* monitor $199. Battery Backup & RS232 print $125. 



DonCarmody W1FLP 
42 Royal Crest Drive 
Nashua NH 03060 



My Own Silver Mine 

For W1FLP, reclaiming silver from photographic fixer is cheap, 
easy, and profitable. King Midas should have had it so good. 



I recently purchased a 
brand spanking new Az- 
den 2m rig. As I was install- 
ing it in the mobile, ] came 
to the realization that my 
total cost was $2.50 — yes, 
that is correct— two dollars 
and fifty cents! No, it was 
not "hot!" I paid a local 
dealer full list price. 

Knowing that many 
brother hams are also ama- 
teur photographers, I 
thought they might have an 
interest in how to obtain 



Q-5QmA 



<5> 



^Xv 



CAKB0N< 
ROD 



nxER 



3$ 

y-ROD 



Fig. 1. Typical electrolysis 
circuit 

46 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



goodies for the shack at a 
relatively low cost. The se- 
cret is in silver reclamation. 

Silver reclamation is gen- 
erally thought to require ex- 
pensive capital equipment 
and in large photo labs it 
does, but for the amateur, 
the equipment can be very 
simple. How simple is deter- 
mined by the amount of 
silver-saturated solution 
you have, how rapidly you 
obtain it, and how fast you 
want to reclaim it 

The silver-saturated solu- 
tion referred to is the photo- 
graphic fixer in every dark- 
room. The process of fixing 
photographic film removes 
the unexposed silver 
crystals from the film. This 
silver remains in solution in 
the fixer. The more film pro- 
cessed, the more silver in 
solution. 

With the price of silver 
what it is, it doesn't take 
much math to find the 
"break-even" point at 
which investment in capital 
equipment is desirable. 



For hams, using their in- 
nate ability to scavenge 
junk boxes to produce 
working apparatus, there is 
an inexpensive, easy meth- 
od to reclaim impressive 
amounts of silver at very 
low cost. 

The method I use is elec- 
trolysis. Basically, it is 
accomplished by passing a 
current (dc) through the so- 
lution, thereby "plating" 
out the silver. Industrial 
concerns use large contain- 
ers with large currents and 
constant circulation of the 
solution. 

I will not get into the 
math required to determine 
the current and voltages; 
the important parameter is 
the current density required 
to reclaim 90% to 98% 
pure silver. The current den- 
sity needed is determined 
by the amount of silver in 
solution, the surface area of 
the electrodes, and the lev- 
el of circulation of the solu- 
tion, A typical electrolysis 
circuit is shown in Fig. 1. 



Any dc supply can be 
used; regulation is not re- 
quired. A simple half-wave 
rectifier without filtering 
will do fine. 

The simple system I use 
is a 1 .5-V alkaline battery, a 
potentiometer, a 0-50 mA 
dc meter, a stainless steel 
rod, and a carbon rod, The 
1.5-V battery and the pot 
can be replaced by any 
available power supply, 
with an increase in the cost 
of silver recovery. 

When a dc current is 
passed through the solu- 
tion, the silver is plated out 
onto the stainless steel rod. 

It is important to monitor 
this plating process until 
you arrive at the correct dc 
current (current density) for 
your individual setup. The 
plated silver should appear 
white to light cream-col- 
ored, If it appears dark 
cream to brown, the current 
density is too high, A darker 
color means that higher 
amounts of contaminants 
are being plated out. 



RTTY - 50 

Basic Terminal Unit 



* 60 mA Loop Keying 

* PLL DoitKJd w/2 pole filter 

* AFSK Generator 



$7900 



Call or write for FREE catalog with over 
65 P, C, Boards & Kits. 



RTTY - 100 

Expanded Version of the Popular 

Hi t * &U 



• AFSK 

• 850/170 

• TTL & BS232 
» 60 mA Loop 

• Loop Supply 

• Auto Start 



■ 4 Pole Filters 

■ AGC laOdp) 



'189 



00 



COMMUNICATIONS DESIGN INC 

1105 Lfchr St — Wesl Memphis. Arkansas 72301 

(501) 735-456* 



^ 



GIANT 

HEAVY DUTY 

ALL PURPOSE TARPAULJNS 



12 >: 16 


S23 


16x20 


$32 


20x20 


S36 


18x24 


$38 


18x32 


$50 


20x30 


$50 



26x40 


So3 


26x56 


S115 


30x60 


$145 


50* 100 


$390 


60x120 


$547 


50* 150 


$562 



COMMVNIC/X TiODIS 

SERVICE 
SPECIALIST 



LOW RATES REPEATERS 
45 DAY WARRANTY* MARS MODS 



A HAM RADIO STORE THAT SPECIALIZES IN SERVICE!. 1 .! 

We are in the business of providing top quality repairs on all types of amateur radio 

equipment. A complete tine of parts is kept on hand to provide you with an extremely 

fast turnaround. 

VOTUC COMMUNICATIONS CO. 

PHONE 146 B RIVER AVE, GUY 

(412)-583-2131 MASON TOWN, PA 15461 ^a» N2CJW 



Before Mitintghr Jan. 23 

VIKING Ind. will send any of the above size 
tarpaulins to any reader of this publication 
wno reads and responds to this test before 
midnight Jan. 23. Each tarpaulin lot 
(#Z 18,PVC) is constructed of high density 
fabric {with virgin grade ingredients, sup- 
plied by Gull Oil Co. n Dow Chemical Co.. and 
Union Oil Go.) with nylon reinforced rope 
hems, double lock stitched hems, electronic- 
ally welded seams, 100% water proof. #4 
( Vi** do ) metal grommets set on 3 ft. centers 
with reinforced triangular corner patches 
and are recommended for all heavy duty use, 
all yachts and sail boats, and all bulk or pal lei 
riding materials, and win be accompanied 
with a LIFETIME guarantee that it must per- 
form 100% or it will be replaced free. Add $7 
handling & crating for each tarp ordered. Vik- 
ing Ind. pays all shipping. Should you wish to 
return your tarpaulins you may do so lor a' 
full refund. Any letter postmarked later than 
Jan. 23, will be returned. LIMIT; Fifty (50) 
tarps per address, no exceptions. Send ap- 
propriate sum together with your name & ad- 
dress to: Tarp Test Dept. #124DJ 4 Viking Ind., 
6314 Santa Monica Blvd., LA., CA.« 90038. or 
for fastest service from any pan: of the coun- 
try cad collect, before midnight 7 days a 
week |213) 462-1914 (Ask exchange operator 
for) TARP TEST JH24DJ. have credit card 
ready 



Reduce the current. The 
color changes can be seen 
in seconds, so if it has not 
been dark for more than a 
few minutes, no harm has 
been done. 

High current densities 
without circulation of the 
solution will result in 
lowered purity of the 
plated-out silver plus a 
chemical change in the 
fixer that will reduce 
the amount of sifver you 
can reclaim 

When the silver has built 
up to a thickness of be- 
tween 1/8 inch to 1/4 inch, 
remove the stainless steel 
bar holding the silver, rinse 
it in warm water, and let it 
dry. 

To remove the silver, 
spread out a plastic or 
paper sheet, strike the 
plating sharply with a 
screwdriver; and it will 
crack. Simply chip off the 
plating until it is all re- 
moved Return the stainless 
steel bar to the silver mine 
and continue. 

Of course, this mine is 
not bottomless. The fixer 

vSee List of Advertisers on pegs 7 M 



solution will eventually be- 
come so low in silver con- 
tent that it must be re- 
placed with fresh solution, 
Fresh solution, in this case, 
means solution that has 
been used to process film 
and is no longer useful for 
fixing film because it is sat- 
urated with silver. 

There are many methods 
to determine the useful 
plating life, i.e., silver con 
tent of the fixer. The easi- 
est but least accurate is the 
color of the solution. When 
it turns the color of medium 
strength tea, replace it, The 
more accurate method is to 
use the Kodak Silver Esti- 
mating Test Papers, cat. no. 
1965466. When dipped in 
the solution, this test paper 
will turn from its normal 
yellow to some shade of 
brown. The darker the col- 
or, the higher the silver con- 
tent remaining in solution 
There is a color comparison 
chart on the back of the 
Kodak folder. I generally 
discard the fixer at a re- 
maining silver level of 1 
gram/liter. 



To set up this simple sil- 
ver mine, I used a carbon 
rod from a discarded D-cell 
battery, a 6-inch stainless 
steel rod, a 1 -lb. plastic 
margarine container, and a 
battery, pot, and meter as 
previously described. 

With no agitation of the 
solution, I maintain a 
current of 5 mA. I have 
been plating out approxi- 
mately 3 ounces troy of 
silver per month. I am 
blessed with the availability 
of 12 gallons of fixer every 
12 weeks that has a silver 
content of approximately 
10 grams/liter, The amount 
of silver you recover per li- 
ter will depend upon its 
starting silver content, i.e., 
how much film has been 
processed through it and 
the average image content 
of the film. 

The effect of the film im- 
age on silver content is that 
a very dark image has most 
of the silver left in the film. 
Conversely, a light image 
has had most of the silver 
removed. The Kodak test 



papers can be used to deter- 
mine this silver content 
and, barring the probable 
contamination of the fixer 
with other chemicals, can 
be used as a guide to the 
useful life of the fixer. 

The above method re- 
quires monitoring but twice 
daily and fixer replacement 
when required If you have 
plenty of fixer and/or want 
a faster recovery rate, sim- 
ply provide a means of gen- 
tle agitation. I have suc- 
cessfully used an old clock 
motor with a plastic shaft 
with a Vi-inch by 2-inch 
paddle connected to the 
sweep second-hand shaft 
immersed in the fixer. This 
has yielded about an ounce 
a week. Larger electrodes, 
higher currents, greater 
agitation, and larger solu- 
tion containers will of 
course increase the recov- 
ery rate. 

So why throw good mon- 
ey down the drain? Dig into 
that silver mine and buy 
some more ham gear.B 

73 Magazine • January, 1983 47 



Fun-Equipment Revisited 

Here are higher-band versions of the ever-popular 
Fun-Mitter and Fun-Amp. They are based on the 

Fun-Philosophy: cheap and simple. 



Mark Oman WAORBff 

yi Detnes Court 
Ft Collins CO &>52> 

Home-brewing is altvi 
and welt! I reached 
this conclusion following 
the response to the publica- 
tion of my series of "Fun" 
homebrew gearJ A Re- 
sponse to the simple, low- 
cost home-brew units has 
been great, indicating that 
hams are still building at 
least some of their own 
gear. From nearly-Novices 
to long-time I xtras, hams 
have built the I un rigs and 
have discovered that build- 
ing is easy, fun, and very 
rewarding. 

Many requests have been 
received asking tor differ- 
ent band coverage of the 
Fun-Mitter and its compan- 
ions* This article is the re- 
sult of those requests. It 
describes a simple CW 
transmitter for 1 r » or 20 me- 
ters operating off 24 volts 
and modification of the 



20-VVatt fun-Amp for opera- 
tion on the same bands. 
The Fun-Ceiver and Fun 

Oscillator are not included 
in this article on modifica- 
tions due to instability 

problems at higher frequen- 
cies Frequency stability is 
of prime importance with 
today's rigs and it is just too 
ditf it ult to obtain the type 
of results desired on the 
higher frequencies and still 
maintain the objectives of 
the gear 

This second version of 
the Fun-Mitter is a five- 
Watt -output, crystal-con- 
trolled CW transmitter that 
uses either low-cost FT243 
crystals at one-third the 
operating frequency or 
HCbU fundamental crystals 
on the operating frequency 
If the variable crystal oscil- 
lator (vxo) capacitor is in- 
stalled (C option), the fre- 
quency can be varied by as 
much as 10 kHz from the 
crystal frequency, using 
\ IC6U crystals 



This coverage allows 
enough flexibility to provide 
plenty of frequencies with 
only a few crystals. Crystals 
are cheap, easy to obtain, re- 
liable, and very stable The\ 
make simple transmitters 
easy for all of us to build! 

Philosophy 

An early objective with 
the Fun-Mitter and Fun-Amp 
was to design simple gear 
(hat was easy to build with 
parts that could be obtained 
from Radio Shack The Mark 
II versions of these rigs fol- 
low the same objective with 
only the crystal and its sock- 
et not being found at Radio 
ShiK Is ( )ther obje< lives 
costs nl less than 525 each 
no tuning adjustments, and 
same size PC boards 
[2Va "X3"). 

These objectives are con- 
tinued in the higher-band 
versions, A twenty-meter 
transmitter and amplifier 
i an easily be built in an af- 
ternoon and put on the air 



si 



- 



Yl 






m 



ft 

v»o 

lOPTIIMJ 



fff 



Ri 
0* 



2f;ca ;£C9 I 

I OOI ! 



T 




24 V TO F UNA UP 






f )} f^^^^—f • >BF TO 

X I -CF- 



T0 f UHAUP 
WIVE FILTER 



100 1*1 

h 32J 



[ ] 0C VOLtS HE* OOWH 



Fig. 1. Schematic of 15/20-meter Fun-Mitter. Reference designators remain the same as in the 
original Fun-Mitter article in order to match the parts locator for the PC board. Capacitance 
values less than 1 are in uF. 

48 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



without adjustments. [The 
reader is strongly urged to 
review the articles on the 
FunnMitter and Fun-Amp tor 
detailed construction and 
design descriptions.) 

Circuit 

The circuits remain un- 
changed from the original 
designs. The resonant circuit 
and filter values, however, 
must be changed to allow 
operation on the higher fre- 
quencies. Radio Shack rf 
chokes and disc ceramic ca- 
pacitors again were used 

The Fun-Mitter schematic 
is reproduced in Fig 1 The 
Pierce oscillator operates on 
the operating frequency us- 
ing either third overtone or 
fundamental crystals, [A 
third overtone is simply 
three times the value 
marked on the crystal) For 
example, to operate the 
transmitter on 14.060 MHz, 
either a 14.060-MHz tunda 
mental crystal can be used 
or a 4.383-MHz crystal can 
be operated on its third 
overtone. (This allows the 
use of cheaper FT243 crys- 
tals in the Fun-Mitter.) Also, 
on fifteen meters many of 
the same crystals used for 
forty meters, when operat- 
ing on their third overtone, 
will provide the frequency 
coverage desired. 

Fundamental mode crys- 
tals in an HC6U holder do, 
however, have the advan- 
tage of more frequen* 
range when used with the 
vxo capacitor (C option) I 
have had several HC6U crys- 
tals, however that do not 
provide a stable, clean oscil- 




I 



C4 
01 



C5 
I 



iff 



ftl 



tl 

4- 



LZ 



L3 



30 



2* 



J-C3 



n r 

V \ 

5? * hi ► uo 



OCV 



4 OUT 
SZ8 



(RMS) 



TO 

FUNUlTTER 



TO 

HALF -WAVE 

FfLTEH 



I ig, 2. Schematic of 15/20-meter Fun-Amp. 




lator signal, probably due to 
the higher-than-normal pow- 
er used in the Fun-Mitter 
oscillator stage. Although 
the FT243 will have a range 
of only approximately 1 kHz 
with the vxo P it will provide 
better and more reliable 
operation (FT24J 4 3- or 
7-MHz crystals for use on 
twenty or fifteen third over- 
tone will not oscillate on ex- 
actly three times the marked 
frequency Depending on 
the crystal, they mav be as 
much as 10 kH^ lower than 
the marked frequency. Keep 
this in mind when ordering.) 



L1 and C3 determine the 
resonant frequency of the 
oscillator. If L1 is construct- 
ed correctly, the oscillator 
should oscillate with no ad- 
justments. A three-turn 
winding (L2) over LI oper- 
ates as a transformer to 
match the collector imped 
ance of Q1 to the base im- 
pedance of Q2, Q3 and pro- 
vide drive. Q2 and Q3 oper- 
ate in parallel as a class C 
amplifier which provides 
good efficiency. 

These 2N3866 transistors, 
Q2 and Q3, are being 
pushed to their limits in the 



Photo A Front view of twenty-meter version of Fun-Mitter/ 
Fun-Amp. 



Fun-Mitter circuit. Under 
some load conditions, some 
hams have discovered that 
Q2 and Q3 can be de 
stroyed To avoid this, either 
reduce the supply voltage to 
20 to 22 volts or increase the 
value of R5 and R6 to 4 to 5 
Ohms Also, the 2N3866 part 
can be replaced with the 
much more rugged IN 5553, 
The only other components 
needing change are C4, C5, 



and I_4 which, together, 
comprise a pi-network filter. 
Component values are given 
in the Parts Lists. 

The Fun-Amp schematic 
is reproduced in Fig. 2. Using 
the Fun-Amp on other fre- 
quencies is even easier than 
using the Fun-Mitter on 
other frequencies Only L2, 
L3, and C3 need to be modi- 
fied. The input circuit re- 
mains completely un- 



FurvMitter- 


-Fig. 1 




C1-C10 


Ceramic disc 


272-xxx 


C3 


20m— 47 pF 
15m— 47 pF 




G4,C5 


20m— 220 pF 
15m 160 pF (2 220 in se- 
ries, 1 47 in parallel) 




C option 


Broadcast variable (any 
small variable with maxi- 
mum capacitance of 100 to 
300 pF will work) 




J3 


Phono jack 


274-386 


J4 


Phone jack 


274-252 


L1 


20m — 20 turns removed 


273-101 




15m— 24 turns removed 


273-101 


L2 


3 turns wound over Q1 end 
of L1 




L3 


10 mH 


273-101 


L4 


20m— 25 turns removed 


273-101 




15m— 27 turns removed 


273-101 


Q1 


RS-2009 


276-2009 


02,03 


RS-2038 


276-2038 


R1-R4 


V* Watt 


271-lxxx 


R5, R6 


Each is three 10 Q, Y* W 
271-001 in parallel 




SI 


DPDT toggle 


275-1546 


Y1 


Crystal— FT243 P HC6U 





Parts Lists 






Fun-Amp- 


-Fig. 2 




C1-C5 


Ceramic disc 


272-xxx 


C1 


570 pF (470 and 100 in par.) 




C3 


20m— 250 pF (2 47 pF in 
series, 1 220 in parallel) 
15m— 160 pF (2 220 pF rn 
series, 1 47 pF in parallel) 




C6 


10>F,35Vdc 


272-1013 


CR1 


1N914 small signal 
silicon 


276*1122 


L1 


10jiH 


273-101 


L2 


20m— 26 turns removed 


273-101 




15m— 28 turns removed 


273-101 


L3 


20m— 24 turns removed 


273-101 




15m— 26 turns removed 


273-101 


Q1-Q3 


VN67AF VMOS FET 


276-2071 


R1,R3 


150Q f % W 


271-013 


R2 


33Q, Vi W 


271-007 


R4 


472, Vi W 


271-009 


R5 


47kQ, Va W 


271-1342 


S2 


DPDT toggle 


275-1 546 




TO-220 heat sink <3) 


276-1 363 




Case 


270-252 




Hardware 


64-3012 
64-3019 




Wire 






Coax 





73 Magazine * January, 1983 49 




Photo 6- Inside view of twenty-meter version of Fun- 
Mitter/Fun-Amp. The coil shown connected between the 
crystal and C (optional) does not exist in the final version of 
the Fun-Mitter 



changed. This circuit oper- 
ates very well at 15 and 20 
meters due to the excellent 
frequency characteristics of 
Q1-Q3. A detailed circuit de- 
scription is given in the Fun 
Amp article. 

Two additions have been 
made to the higher-frequen- 
cy versions of the transmit- 
ter and amp, Hg, 1 shows a 
half-wave harmonic filter 
which reduces harmonic ra- 
diation. Also, a10-^F capaci- 
tor (272-1013) has been add- 
ed at the key jack (J 4} to 
shape the keyed waveform 
and eliminate any key cli< ks 

Construction 

Even though the Fun-Amp 
and Fun-Mi tter are "goof- 
proof " projects, care and 
thought must be put into 
their construction, Although 
the fifteen- and twenty-me- 
ter versions are as simple as 
the earlier models, it might 
be helpful to review some 
pitfalls to watch for 

For best results, use of a 
PC board is strongly recom- 
mended.* Refer to the earli- 
er articles for the patterns 
and component locators 
The 2 V« * bv 3 " format 
shown in Photo B is small 
enough to allow mounting 
flexibihr\ I would suggest 
that this format be followed 
Combining several bands, 
amplifier, transmitter, etc., 
on one board can lead to 

50 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



problems, particularly if you 
are inexperienced in home- 
brew. 

Before building, develop 
a plan as to how you will 
load the boards, assemble 
the unit, and test After the 
plan is developed, proceed 
carefully Most problems 
are due to misloaded parts, 
poorly soldered connec- 
tions (rosinn:ore solder is a 
must!), faulty components, 
and hasty build-and-test. 
Most of these problems can 
be avoided by developing a 
plan and carefully and 
thoughtfully following it. 

Radio Shack rf chokes are 
used as inductors by remov- 
ing turns as necessary. Fif- 
teen- and twenty-meter cir- 
cuits require less inductance 
ancl P therefore, the coils will 
have fewer turns. In con- 
structing the coils, be sure 
that the exact number of 
turns is removed and that in- 
sulation is scraped from the 
end of the wire that will be 
resoldered to the coil form 
The three-turn Fun-Mttter 
coil (L2) that is wound over 
LI should be wound in the 
same direction as the turns 
of L1. Also, wind it over the 
end of LI that is mounted 
nearest Q1. The excess wire 
cut off when the turns are re- 
moved is excellent for wir- 
ing L2 Refer to Photo B for a 
view of the coils. 

It is best to construct a 



TO FUN 

FUN AMP 



.1? 

ANTENNA 

TO 

RECEIVER 



TO *24V 



ANTENNA 




Fig. X Half -wave filter for 
15/20-meter Fun-Mitterf Fun- 
Amp. The filter reduces any 
harmonic radiation to be- 
low acceptable levels. It is 
wired using point-to-point 
wiring between the antenna 
connector and SI . The filter 
provides receiver filtering 
by placing it before the re- 
ceiver antenna connector. 
Values are as follows; use 
273-101 10 uH rf choke with 
turns removed; 272-xxx 
series ceramic caps. 



20m 

Ca 220 

Cb 440 (2 220 in 

parallel) 
Cc 220 

La 26 turns 
removed 

Lb 26 turns 
removed 



15m 

ISO 1100 & 47 
in parallel) 

J20 (100 & 220 
in parallel) 

150 £100 & 47 
in parallel) 

20 turns 
removed 

28 turns 
removed 



single band in one box rath- 
ei than combining bands. 
This is slightly more costly 
due to duplication of some 
parts, but it eliminates 
switching problems com- 
pletely 

An advantageous modifi- 
cation to the Fun-Mitter is to 
allow a "spotting" function 
This is helpful when finding 
your frequency on your re- 
ceiver without transmitting 
on the air. This is accom- 
plished by continuously ap- 
plying 24 V to the oscillator 
stage To do this, break the 
connection between L1 and 
LI, then connect LI directly 
to 24 V Also, one end of R1 
is removed from the circuit 
board and a wire from it run 
to the 24-V side of L1 With 
this modification, pressing 
the key will produce a note 
in the receiver with the 
send/receive switch set to re- 
ceive See Fig. 4 for details 
of the modification. 

Crystals can be obtained 
very easily After deciding 
on either FT243 third over- 



ftUN JUMPER 

TO Ll PAD FROW 

LIFTED END 

of m 



break 

connection here 



A 



LtFT END OF 
ft I FROM BOAflC 



-: 




Fig. 4. Modification to allow 
spotting" of transmitter (use 
when using PC pattern from 
the February, 1981 73). 

tone or HC6U fundamental 
both crystals and sockets 
can be ordered from a sup* 
plier such as CVV Crystals or 

Ian Crystals.* 

Adjustment 

Adjusting the high-fre- 
quency Fun-Mitter and Fun 
Amp is just as easy as with 
the low-band versions. 
Again by thinking carefully 
through the process, the r 
can be set up without prob- 
lems in a short time 

If possible, find a VOM to 
use at this stage Although 
not absolutely necessary, it 
is much more helpful and 
educational to see what is 
happening during tune-up 
Begin by ensuring that you 
do indeed have a 24-V 
source (either lantern bat- 
teries or the Fun-Mitter pow 
er supply]. Measure the volt- 
age, With +24 V discon- 
nected, measure the resis- 
tance at the voltage-input 
connector to ensure that no 
shorts exist to ground (use 
Ohms scale) 

It is essential that a dum- 
my load be connected to the 
antenna connector at all 
times during tune-up For 
the Fun-Mitter/Fun-Amp 
combination, a dummy load 
capable of dissipating 20 
Watts will be needed With* 
out a load, the transistors 
will be destroyed quickly 

The final step in tune-up is 
to attach an ammeter and 
begin testing! Connect an 
ammeter capable of mea- 
suring at least 1 5 Amps in 
series in the +24 line going 
to the gear Set the T/R 
switch (Si] to "transmit 
With the Fun Amp switched 



out, the meter should read 
around 300 mA with the key 
pressed, Switching the Fun- 
Amp in should produce a 
reading of around 1.2 Amps 
with the key down, indicat- 
ing a power input of around 

30 Watts. 

As can be seen, there are 

no adjustments to be made. 

This is one of the beauties of 

the gear After building the 

units carefully, they should 

work the first time with no 

adjustments! 

If trouble is encountered, 

check the following: 

1. Isolate the problem to 
a stage— Fun-Milter, Kin- 
Amp; if Fun Mitter. does os- 
cillator work? 

2. Measure voltages at 
collectors and drains of 
transistors with T/R switch in 
T position {should read 24 
V), 

3 Check for wiring errors 
4. Check soldering 

Operating 

The thrill of home-brew 

construction comes in the 



actual operation. Making 
contacts with gear you built 
yourself is fun! The high-fre- 
quency Fun-Mitter and Fun- 
Amp easily will produce 
worldwide contacts. Twenty 
Watts on 15 or 20 meters 
can bring in contacts from 
all continents easily. 

With the capability of 15- 
fhrough 80-meter operation 
with the Fun gear, WAS, 
WAC and DXCC are all 
within reach. Good luck!B 

References 

t. "The Fun-Mitter— A Goof- 
Proof Rf Project," 73, February, 
1981. 

2. "The FurvCeiver," 73, July. 
1981, 

3. "The Fun-Oscillator;' 73. 
February, 1982. 

4. "The Fun-Amp/' 73. May. 
1982 

5. PC boards may be obtained 
from the author for $7.00 ppcL 
each. (For both originals and 
modified,) 

6. CW Crystals, 570 N. Buffalo 
St.. Marshfield MO 65106; Jan 
Crystals. 2400 Crystal Drive, Ft. 
Myers FL 33906. 



1900 - 2500 MHZ KITS 



DOWN CONVEX TEX MiT 
$19.95 





P. C S0ARU 
PXE-PXUtEPAHP 
SOL PEX HOWE P 

3 MXf90f TXAMS 
2 HPP/OPtS 

t CM/P CAPS 'tdXGE' 
S XESfSTOXS 

4 PXEPA/XEP C0/£S t 

fACWxr wovmp 

t&MFPCAP. 




suxpty cabinets 



nam**** tttiti ft ttrttrnttt* It 
Hmt*lw**tttti^ i* f* 

MANVTACTUXEV 
C ABU SITS 




ttttt tttt t*i 
J tit Hwt \tt 

it ft rt*f itr 




..ttttt 

,Mta tt 
tti tf 



33 WASHEXS 
32 SPACE*? 
J 3F00JXOP 
2 MV7S 
? S'PVCPtPi 
2 fi MP CAPS 
t MOUNTING BAR 
f V C0NMECT0X 
t NUT AMP BCt T 



PISCOVMTS 

f r##, , .jj« 

ft *t J* 

it tttt.. 



tt tb rn_. 
it* /**»$- 

ttt* 4*.— 




H* tit 191 tfTT Cf 0*r ti 4ttt* 

fit ttHmtrt HTttttTI 




/ PX. MOAXP 
/ POWiX TXAMSf, 

f 3f?tAPJi/STA8LE 
XEGVLATQX 

i FINE WNiNG POL 

WiTMSWiTCH 

C0AXSE TUNING POT. 
XN0BS 
V- C0NMECT0XS 

* P0W£X P/0PES 
f XF CHOKE 
3 XESiSTOXS 
3 PfSXCAPS 
f TQ00MFPCAP. 
I PPPT MiMf TOGGLE 
SWITCH 

t IEP WITH HOLDER 



MAIL ORDERS 

ADD S5.00 FOA SHIPPING AND HAN- DUNG. 
INDIANA RESIDENTS ADD 4% SALES TAX. 




Arnencan 
Express 


^H 


Cartfe 


Wteioorre 





TRiONYX IND* INC. 
6219 COFFMAN RD. 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND> 
46268 *" 10* 
(3T7J 291-7280 
(317) 291-2995 




TUSA 




A VfflOii *»CW WCMLD OF TV V«<M1H4 WITH TU»*'» 
HEW MODEL C1W-M, « CHAflW L CA1U tV CONVERTER 

Ffe£4lv* all rh* EJUHA CJL01.E IV "WiDBANQ i 4UPEBBAND 
CHRNNELB on vour tlNH 0M4. 

I- Ii rrnnalai 1fi« n*«t far riwllig or luialng TNli ilpbls anct 
neliiDf* uvtwp Dcnwli mnvM natto TV chamMlt to Unit swi 
d* walvwt nn in* UHF Iimtr t* yOm TV t*t 

A musj ran vmoumng fhqi* cabU TVt 

The wfftacr, allavii you la jpagurit iKilh in»V \Vi*>\t W *ftii:«nii*i iimijirmn h<ii1 pIuncJuhJ 
Libit cfiiinnUb lor ?apiPQ on inv VCH - ^n>l* vui, nra ,00 fiC 

now vo.yo,. 



Um •• Iht t^ pij l" d U i»:> ii 
i*m In pu -w«i em<i hi c» 



'■■-.-I. i " U l.ii.J ..Ir.,|.l|.. "I UMf.l.jl I IV»IEl 'III' 

NOW J VAJL^ffJLE 
NEW TUNEABLE Ot LUX MODEL CVU-1000 



*34.95 



WINEOARD 
75 OHM IHF TAG1 AMTENMAS 



12 db GAtK 
CHANNELS «4 - : 
*8"la 
• OR MORE 




OfDOMi 

WlrwdBiff Uh* 

Artjanm WrmutMi 

■tfUbOmn 




POPULM 

MICROWAVE 

PAHtS 



u- PI 
3 If 

tm 

113 

«J 
JO 

ml 




rjni 

awiierrm 



BRAND NEW UHF 
VARACTOfl rUNEtiS 



fc— 



«■ — -* — 




CHQtCl 



&«nyo 

45 MHi 

Outpul l 24.95 M 

C*N fw Qwinlrty 



MMiumi 
4b MHi 
Qulpul 



raPULAR IC I 



TOP OUALTTT 
ND SECONDS 




ittmm 

LM-38AN 2 

NE-6B4N 
I V-rififiN 
LM733N 
MC- !330 

MC-1351/ 

MClJS! 

**C145fl 

MC-14SKN 

MCiU! 

■JU 1BH 



J^ MV HM 

/ 10 Ui. JNm 



S% MICA CAPS 9% 



^^ TUMXf 



pWpVI 
LOW LOSS 

pram 

SfDRMlAS 



lM tk-ir 
LH7A15 

LM 
LM 



□ ESCRtFTKHI 



M 7R15 IS 

m riii I iB 

M < T «* | ?* 

I ■ I ■■ I ■■■! 



3 wall Audld Puwci Amp 
LQ# ^>M*a# Audio Amp 

.5DDWr9V 
DlflUJl PfidH LOC*«t Loop 
Phann J.DC".od Ldcci 
VM«D AmfJ 

VkIJ.ID UliriHZtDI 

v, i .i. . IP Amp 

Video rr Amp 

Video II Amp AGC 

Audla H *inp 

RF.ModulJloi 

Dual CDmp Op Amp 

Bplpncwl ModiDotnoAitalor 

Hvbfiii »vn(ii|iiei 

MJ. SIP*" 0»™ctw 

VMmb M«M*ttM 

LMAfl VDHHH aBULHTlMG 

S V4rt P*tllh* Voir fleu 
a Vo4\ failli™ Voll Flee 
12 Vail PcvtHrt Vdl. Rflfl 
15 Volt PoMlttw VoJ!. Flog 

Vole f*o»flJ»e Vol. ratifl. 

Vatt PpaHtra Vnli. Ftag 



1 I 



IIjN 

• i9 

2.44 
?» 
I ,". 
2.*9 

J V 

l.fO 

*.4G 

1.30 
13B 

ua 



ia 



tl 29 

1.29 

1 29 
1 -i i 
1 B9 
I US 
i ;■: 
2.08 
1 /B 
2J7 
'!' 
Ijfi 
QUI 
105 
?*H 

r» 
til 

iJi 
i » 

T-lfi 



Mdlil LttO C«pf 

1C. -ir L '«H5-V 111 in* 

l^nrnMi* If. *+ 

1«M#JqV I n Aw 

irv»n««»v i ii s»o» 

. 1 It »»•• 
I 11 1Mb* 



*Ji3l LCNJ Dipt 

IS or *no*» 
28HflHd«aSV 1-11 

ta 

1B0V =l(ft. 

14 

annt 2B is 

.0QZ2wr 20 IS 

PM 2C IS 

pcraa A is 




TIM 
IJtM. 

i *tm, 

IHH 
l T*Mt 

1fJ 

iji 
I* 

n 



PHDJIC1 
BOSS 



UHF - VHF^ Rl 
SPUTTER 



'14,70 



WC A VIDEO 
MMLATOftS 





1* up 

CuiWoof « 300 



■ '» 





■12.S0** 



catv uurr vcn 



sunn its 

STtVAMA 

VHF VAMCTQA TUHER^ 



134 



*»B»i 




Witif n«T LAiT? 

Mass.. 



•Z48-. 



• ...... 

«-»DPDT] 
«-Up 

1-12 

i3-a 

romim T3DH2 
a up 

TotDicS&- fl?-2 . . 

ac up 



PRATS 

i ■ < 
pott 



156 



ORDER NOW 

TOVt FKE£ 

800-a&4-4655 

CVTUQC CALff Oft M.A 

714-635-5090 



R F 

ELECTRONICS **8^ 



w 



^ttJUt 



lOtt H STATE CQt LtGt SL VO . DEPT 6 
AAAHEIM. CALIFORNIA 92S0S 



WELCOME PLEASE IWCLUOE PQStJUJE SHIPPED 5Ati£ DAV RfCHVED MO WJHIMUlI QflD£H> 




HIGH PERFORMANCE 
PRESELECTOR-PREAMP 



The solution to most interference, intermod, and desense 
problems in AMATEUR and COMMERCIAL systems. 

40 lo 1000 Mhz - tuned to your frequency 

b large helical resonators 

Low noise * Higji overload resistance 

8 dB gain - ultimate rejection> 80 dB 

to to 15 volts DC operation 

Size - 1 .6 x 2.6 x 4.75" exc. connectors 

FANTASTIC REJECTION! 

Price - $69 95 bipolar w/flCA jacks 
Connector options: BNC $5, UHF S6. 

N $10 
SUPER HOT! GaAs Fet option $20 




Typical rejection: 
+ 600 Khz® 144 Mhz. -28dB 
+ 1.6tVlhz@220Mhz: -40dB 
±5 Kh7@45QMhz -50dB 



AUTOMATIC IDENTIFIERS 



10 f 





ID-2 



• For Transcefvera and repeater AHATFUR ^na COMMERCIAL 

• Automatic operation adfusubJe speed and amputate 

• Small s^e easy mstaUatipri - 7 to 15 volts DC 

• S detectable mpfogrammaote message - e^cn up ro 2 mm &ng 

• Wired re^Tpci and programmet with your message! s? 

Mode* 10 1 ■ S39 95 Model \J}2 */2 *o 10 rrimite timer - l^B 95 

We aite* % complete line at transmitter and receiver strips 
and synthesize* 5 for amateur and commercial use. 
•est our tree catalog Aiiom S2 tor UPS sfttpptng Master&int ana VISA *ntcome 



GLB ELECTRONICS 



1952 Clinton St. Buffalo. NY 14206 
716-824-7936. 9 to 4 



^143 



^See Ltst ot Advertis&ts on page f 14 



73 Magazine * January, 1983 51 



Frank R. Fortune N6BW 
2351 Nina Street 
Pasadena CA 91107 



The Ultimate Breadboard 

There used to be two styles of prototypes — rat's nest and 
cramped. Now there is a third style— simple. 



There are at least a doz- 
en different boards on 
the market intended for 
prototyping and one-of-a- 
kind construction projects. 
Most that I have used in my 
ham activities, in the class- 
es at Los Angeles Access, 
and professionally have 
either been lacking in flexi- 
bility and ease of construc- 
tion or are difficult to cir- 
cuit trace. 

Of the commonly-avail- 
able types, the wire-wrap 
board, for example, is ex- 
tremely difficult to circuit 
trace, especially when the 



component density read 
a certain point. This is com- 
plicated by the fact that 
components must be 
placed in IC header plugs. 

The widely-used perf- 
board-type with general- 
purpose foil pads is much 
too cramped, lacks definite 
locations for ICs, is too dif- 
ficult to circuit trace, and is 
prone to solder bridges. 

The third common type, 
consisting of many small 
squares, works reasonably 
well for small projects. 
However, it becomes en- 
tirely too large for bigger 




■ 







circuits, it also lacks defi- 
nite locations for compo- 
nents, especially ICs. 

The board shown here 
solves many of the prob- 
lems by combining a num- 
ber of the good features of 
all systems into one, all 
contained on a standard 
4VS"X6Vi" 22-pin edge- 
connect card. The connec- 
tor may be cut off easily if it 
is not used. 

The basic features of the 
board are sixteen 16-pin 
DIP patterns for small ICs 
and one 40-pin pattern for 
larger ICs such as micropro- 
cessors, UARTs, etc. Alter- 
nately, the larger pattern 
will accommodate two ad- 
ditional 16-pin ICs, 

Two continuous power 
rails run throughout the 
board and are available on 
both sides of all IC patterns. 
There is also a set of pads 
and a foil area for a 3-termi- 
nal tab-type regulator. On 
the opposite end from the 



edge connector are a num- 
ber of small pads for 
switches or indicator LEDs. 

Locating Components 

Components may be 
mounted on either side of 
the board. In some cases, 
#60 holes will have to be 
drilled in the plain pads for 
this. For experimenting, 
however, all components 
including the ICs are best 
placed on the foil side, This 
leaves the entire circuit in 
view without turning the 
board over, In this way, the 
circuit is much easier to 
visualize. 

For more permanent proj- 
ects, some of the larger 
components and the ICs are 
best placed on the non-foil 
side, Buses of many wires 
are also better on the back 
to keep them out of the 
way during testing and re- 
pair Resistors, small capac- 
itors, and most intercon- 
necting wires should be on 
the foil side. 




Forming a short jumper from hare wire using a sma 
round tool and the end oi your finger. 

52 73 Magazine • January, 1983 




A component properly formed and soldered to the board. 



AZDEN • NEW! + AZDEN * NEW! * AZDEN * NEW! * AZDEN 



THE GIANT 



• 



COMPANY 



REVOLUTIONIZES THE STATE OF THE ART 

INTRODUCE THE BRILLIANT NEW PCS" 2800 



AND 



o. 



MICROCOMPUTER CONTROLLED 

SUPERIOR COMMERCIAL GRADE 



• 



FM TRANSCEIVER 




SPECIAL 



<MWflWCIMP 

FCS-2800 




— ' • U f-t 






scmuooE 




MOCCNT 



fOMBWCL RF/7T/SQL HGH/UX* UXiSQL 




<j. : \j. : 




VISA- 



COMPARE THESE FEATURES 
WITH ANY UNIT AT ANY PRICE 



FREQUENCY RANGE: Receive and transmit: 28.000 to 29.995 
MHz, lOKHz steps with built-in - 100 KHz repeater offset. 

• ALL SOLID STATE CMOS PL DIGITAL SYNTHESIZED. 

• SIZE: UNBELIEVABLE! ONLY 6 3/4" x 2 3/8" x 9 3M".COMPARE! 

• MICROCOMPUTER CONTROLLED: All scanning and frequency- 
control functions are performed by microcomputer. 

• DETACHABLE HEAD: The control head may be separated from the 
radio for use in limited spaces and for security purposes. 

• SIX-CHANNEL MEMORY; Each memory is re-programmable. 
Memory is retained even when the unit is turned off. 

• MEMORY SCAN: Tne six channels may be scanned in either the 
"busy" or "vacant 1 modes for quick, easy location of an occupied 
or unoccupied frequency. AUTO RESUME, COMPARE I 

■ PULL-BAND SCAN: All channels may be scanned in either "busy" 
or "vacant 1 mode. This is especially useful for locating repeater 
frequencies in an unfamiliar area. AUTO RESUME. COMPARE! 
INSTANT MEMORY-1 RECALL: By pressing a button on the 
microphone or front panel, memory channel 1 may be recalled for 
immediate use. 

• MIC-CONTROLLED VOLUME AND SQUELCH: Volume and 
squelch can be adjusted from the microphone for convenience in 
mobile operation. 

• DIRECT FREQUENCY READOUT: LED display shows operating 
frequency, NOT channel number, COMPARE! 

• TEN (10) WATTS OUTPUT: Also 1 watt low power for shorter 



distance communications. LED readout displays power selection 
when transmitting. 

DIGITAL S'RF METER: LED* Indicate signal strength and power 
output. No more mechanical meter movements lo fall apart! 
LARGE WINCH LED DISPLAY: Easy-to-read frequency display 
minimizes "eyes-off- the- road" time, 

PUSHBUTTON FREQUENCY CONTROL FROM MIC OR FRONT 
PANEL: Any frequency may be selected by pressing a microphone 
or front-pane? switch. 

SUPERIOR RECEIVER SENSITIVITY: 0.23 uV for 20-dB quieting. 
The squelch sensitivity is superb, requiring less than 0.1 uV to 
open. The receiver audio circuits are designed and built to exacting 
specifications, resulting in unsurpassed received-signal 
intelligibility. 

TRUE FM. NOT PHASE MODULATION: Transmitted audio quality 
is optimized by the same high standard of design and construction 
as is found In the receiver. The microphone amplifier and com- 
pression circuits offer intelligibility second to none. 
OTHER FEATURES: Dynamic Microphone, built in speaker, 
mobile mounting bracket, external remote speaker jack (head and 
radio} and much, much more. AM cords, plugs, fuses, microphone 
hanger, etc. included. Weight 6 lbs. 

ACCESSORIES: 15' REMOTE CABLE, ...$29.95. FMPS-4R A/C 
POWER SUPPLY. .„$39.95. TOUCHTONE MIC. KIT.... $39.95. 
EXTERNAL SPEAKER.... 51 B.00. 



AMATEUR-WHOLESALE ELECTRONICS order now toll free 



B817 S.W. 129th Terrace. Miami. Florida 33176 
Telephone (3051 233 3631 • Telex. 80-3356 

US. DISTRIBUTOR DEALER 
INQUIRIES INVITED **S 



III 



l 



CREDIT CARD HOLDERS MAY USE OUR TOLL FREE ORDERING NUMBER 



Attaching Components 

The biggest mistake most 
first-time users of the board 
make is looping compo- 
nents too high. Keep every- 
thing as tight against the 
board as possible. All com- 
ponents should be pre- 
formed, with leads kept as 
short as possible. After sol- 
dering, give the component 
or wire a gentle bend back 
and forth to relieve lead 
stress, This is important, es- 
pecially when connecting 
another component to the 
same spot, as it will prevent 
the first component from 
moving when the solder is 
remelted. 

Do not connect compo- 
nents in midair. Even if you 
have to tie one end of a 
component to an unused 
pad and complete the con- 
nection with a piece of 
wire, the final result will be 
much neater and less likely 
to be damaged by subse- 
quent handling By the 
same token, it is wise to use 



the same technique to 
avoid crossing components 
over lCs. If you have to 
replace the IC at a later 
date, it will be much easier 
if you do not have to re- 
move other components. 

For long interconnec- 
tions, use insulated wire. 
For close or adjacent pads, 
bare tinned wire is best. To 
jump over a pad or rail, 
form the bare wire as you 
install it. Using a long piece, 
solder one end first. After 
the solder hardens, bend 
the long end up at about a 
45° angle. Next place a 
small round tool, like a 
common nail, on the pad to 
be jumpered. I twill be easy, 
then, to bend the wire down 
over the nail into contact 
with the pad to which it is to 
be soldered. Clip the end 
with small diagonal cutters 
and then solder. 

I recommend wire-wrap 
wire for use on the board. It 
is available in inexpensive 
small rolls at most electron- 
ic parts stores. It has solid 



conductor and heat-proof 
insulation. Stranded wire or 
wire with ordinary PVC 
plastic insulation is very 
hard to work with. You also 
may need to buy a little 
stripping tool — ordinary 
strippers often work poorly 
on wire-wrap wire. 

Plan Your Work 

It is quite a temptation, 
because of the ease of con- 
struction using the board, 
to simply grab components, 
wire, and solder and to be- 
gin building without plan- 
ning Even if you are doing 
original design work, give 
the layout of the board 
some preliminary thought I 
find it invaluable to literally 
draw out the project in pen- 
cil The main benefit is in re- 
ducing the number of 
'across-the-board' wires 
It's not possible to elimi- 
nate them all r but a little 
planning reduces the num- 
ber and makes the final 
board much neater and eas- 
ier to repair in the future. 



Conclusion 

For original design work, 
for student use, and for pro- 
ducing permanent repeater 
control systems, the board 
has become very popular in 
my local group. Personally, 
I like it best for "one-of-a- 
kind" projects that appear 
in ham magazines, Many ar- 
ticles do not contain board 
layouts The board has pro- 
vided a very satisfactory 
and quick means to build 
such projects. It also great- 
ly facilitates modification 
of published circuits to 
one's own needs in a form 
that is genuinely permanent 

The prototype board is 
available commercially 
from WbELECTRONICS, 
PO Box 5515, Pasadena CA 
91107, for $6.95 (California 
residents add 6% sales tax). 
For home construction, a 
photographic negative is 
available for $4.95. The 
board is made of G-10 glass 
epoxy, drilled, and rosin- 
coated. ■ 








Fig. T. The better prototyping board. 



54 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



SuperStickll&lll 

+9db 5/8 wave + 3db 1/4 wave 

Plus a 2 Meter or 220 MHz Duck 
For Under A Buck 



1te& 



■ 



$ 



19 



For The Duck 



THE WORD IS OUT! 

The SSIt 2 mete* a SSHI 220 MHz 5/6 wave ants 
exhibit 9 db gain over a short rubber duck when 
fuity extended and 3db when collapsed to a 
quarter wave. The SS! I or SSHI is the solution to 
many of those fringe area problems that plague 
every repeater system. With the Tuned Antenna's 
exclusive modular constructor! you cen replace 
or exchange any of the 1 5 types of base connectors, 
plus the tefescopic section may be replaced for 
only $5 00 The tuned loading coil'apnng is soldered 
to the machined end caps not & wedged- And 
there are no ticky tacked capacitors or leads m 
the SSI I or SS ill's loading coif to break. 

There are no short cuts in designing and building 
quality ants, The Super Stick ants, are the only 5/8 
wave a nts. that spec gam in db at a 1 /4 wave and 
5/8 wave over a rubber duck. These gain figures 
were obtained from extensive field testing on 
HTa Now you know why the word is out The SSII 
S SSI 1 1 ants give your HT more effective power. 
Call one of our 1 1 2 dealers today 



MOBIL LINE 

1/4 wave antenna 
with magnetic base 



$ 



14 



95 



Truly a portable 1 /4 
wave 2 meter 220 or 
440 MHz magnetic 
based antenna to 
withstand over 55 
MPH, Weather resis- 
tant fiberglass 
whips, black or 
white. Cutting chart 
met. 




WITH NMO TYPE 

5/8 wave 2 meter 
mobile antenna 
with cable- 



r 



9 





$ 



29 



95 







MB- 2 MB-220 MB-440 MB 10 IVM50 MH-440 
2 meter 220 MHx440 MHz 10 meter 1/4 wave ants 



To Order Call 



^57 



H (619) 268-0720 




Terms CQD, check or money order 
Please add $2.00 tor firs? antenna and 
S 100 for each add J i antenna 
to cover shipping and handling 



THE TUNED ANTENNA CO. 9520 Chesapeake Dr., #606. San Diego, CA 92123 



at last - everything at your 

fingertips i!! 



■ 

I H 'i'C- 



--* 



"=ra 



$784 



Radio Equipment 
NOT Included 

F.O.B. Culver City 
(CA Residents add 6% sales tax) 



Bring ORGANIZATION & 
CONVENIENCE to your 
HAM Station ! Eliminate 
clutter and provide lots of 
space for everything you 
need - Tuners, VFO, CW 
Keyers, Filters, Telephone, 
Log Book, Etc... 



ANGLED REAR SHELF 
ALL PARTS FITTED 
STURDY CONSTRUCTION 
WALNUT or PECAN FINISH 
Floor space: 39"w by 30U 
Also: 51 "w by 3Q"d - $799.50 

Dealers Inquiries Invtted 




Dealer 



A Finely Crafted Piece of Furniture 

With a REAL Purpose . . . 

Call : (213) 837-4870 or Write for Information 

S-F Amateur Radio Services 

4384 Keystone Ave., Culver City, CA 90230 



^65 



Large selection 

of Amateur and 

Marine Communications 

Equipment Available 

Call for Quotes 

800-336-4799 

Lacombe Distributors 
Davis & lackson Road •*" a04 
I P.O. Box 203 r 
Lacombc LA 70445 i 
"■I (504) 882 5355 



**See List of Advertisers on page fM 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 55 



Beating the Untraceable Buzz 

Man-made interference doesn't have to destroy reception. 
Not when you use WIGV's buzz-beating antennas. 






.p. s:^::::::::::~ 



GAP (I INCH) 



COAX SHIELD 




t 
I 

I 
I 
I 
• 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
J 



! 



r«j 



TO RECEIVER 



r- 



t=§= 



^6AP (1 tUCH} 




\ 



f*J 



TO RECEIVER 



Fig, 1. Two versions of the shielded loop, (a) A single-turn 
version may be constructed using tubing and heavy wire or 
by using coaxial cable. The value of C will have to be deter- 
mined by experimentation, although a 365-pF receiving- 
type variable usually will suffice (b) A multi-turn loop is 
shown. Circumference of the loop should be about 0.15 
wavelength in either case, although it may be considerably 
less if a preamplifier is used. See text 

56 73 Magazine • January, 1963 



Stan G'tbtliscQ W1GV/4 
PO Box 567652 
Miami FL 3315& 



You've just moved into a 
new apartment or a 
new house for rent and the 
landlord has given his okay 
to your putting up a four- 
band trap vertical on the 
roof. (Miracles do happen!) 
So you blithely install your 
new station console, trying 
to improve the layout still 
further over what you had 



Frequency 


Circumference 


MHz 


Faet 


Meters 


1.8 


78 


(24) 


3.5 


40 


(12) 


7 


20 


(6.1) 


10 


14 


(4.3) 


14 


10 


(3,1) 


18 


8 


(2.4) 


21 


7 


(2.0) 


24 


6 


(1-8) 


28 


5 


(1,5) 



Table 1. Circumference of a 
shielded loop for various 
frequencies. These circum- 
ferences represent 0.15 
wavelength for the indicat- 
ed bands, if a preamplifier is 
used, the loop may be used 
at frequencies below that 
where it is 0.15 wavelength. 



the last time; you painstak- 
ingly solder every PL-259 
onto the interconnecting 
cables. You ground your 
equipment with a bus bar of 
1/4-inch copper tubing run- 
ning to a cold-water pipe 
only three feet away. You 
install 20 radials on the roof 
for each band (80 in all, and 
with the best stranded No. 
16 wire). Finally, everything 
is ready to go. 

You turn on the receiver. 
A solid installation, this, 
you proudly think to your- 
self. Not a DX killer, to be 
sure, but it's well built and 
there should be plenty of 
good hamming ahead, The 
S-meter reads a steady S9 
+ 20. You turn up the 
volume: ZZZZZZ! Up and 
down the band you tune. 
The noise limiter does no 
good; the pulses must be 
too broad ZZZZZZ! So 
much for 20 meters. 

Switch to 40. Peak up the 
preselector ZZZZZZ! 59 + 
30. Damn. Switch to 15. 
Peak it up, ZZZZZZ! Only 
S9. Oh, great! Why even try 
10? Why make yourself de- 
pressed needlessly? 

The Search Begins 

The next step, of course, 

is to switch off everything 



in the place except the rig. 
Thwack! Thwack! Thwack! 
One circuit breaker after 
another. And from the 
shack, several rooms away, 
you can hear the receiver 
with the volume up to 3:00: 
ZZZZZZZ — it stops! Your 
heart leaps Whoops, that 
was the shack. Thwack! 
ZZZZZZZ 

The XYL shouts, "Will 
you turn that thing down 
and stop fussing with the 
lights? I'm trying to watch 
TV and iron!" 

All your clocks were set 
to WWV from your watch, 
which you had to set at a 
friend's QTH because you 
can't even hear WWV at 
yours. Now alt the clocks 
are out of whack since you 
played with the breakers, 

You run all over the yard, 
using a little, plastic 
6-transistor AM radio your 
Aunt Jenny gave you for 
Christmas back in '65 and 
you've hardly used for any- 
thing until now. Some 
places the noise is louder, 
some places softer. But 
there is no logical pattern. 
It's everywhere, but it's cen- 
tered nowhere. 

You try to DF (direction 
find) using the ferrite loop- 
stick in the little radio. 
There is a sharp null in the 
direction of either the elm 
tree out front, or else 180 
degrees opposite, from 
somewhere under the drive- 
way. Move into the back- 
yard. It's either coming 
from the rising full moon or 
else from the base of the 
swing set. 

No power transformers 
of any consequence in the 
area. The noise is constant, 
around the clock. You get 
up at 5:00 am: ZZZZZZ! 
You come home for lunch 
(actually, instead of lunch). 
ZZZZZZ! Your stomach 
growls. 

You'll never get rid of it. 

You Could Search More 

Oh, yes, eventually, if 
you search long and hard 



enough, you'll find it 
Maybe it's an electric 
blanket in a neighbor's 
house. But, then, who uses 
an electric blanket for 24 
hours out of every day? A 
refrigerator? Maybe, but 
they don't run continuous- 
ly, unless unless there is 
not enough of that coolant 
stuff in them, Hmmm, 

It's not a street lamp 
starter, since it happens 
during the day. A fluores- 
cent tamp starter, maybe? 
Well, who leaves a fluores- 
cent lamp on for 24 hours a 
day? You might snoop 
around the neighborhood 
at 4:00 am or so and see if 
anybody has any fluores- 
cents on. But, no, you might 
get arrested or mugged or 
something. 

Maybe it's a thermostat 
mechanism. Cod help you. 

What Can You Do? 

Although I've made light 
of all this, it's not exactly 
funny when it happens. And 
sometimes you just will not, 
by any reasonable means, 
be able to locate and/or 
eliminate a source of man- 
made noise. If it's some- 
body's refrigerator without 
coolant, maybe it will burn 
up some day. A noisy fluo- 
rescent light starter will 
eventually fail and have to 
be replaced. Lot of good 
that does you now. 

The situation is not hope- 
less, though, Noise has dif- 
ferent characteristics than 
signals There are ways of 
getting your antenna sys- 
tem to favor those single- 
frequency signals that you 
want to hear, while discour- 
aging that wide-band hash 
that you can'f stand to hear. 

There are basically three 
methods of doing this. You 
can use them in combina- 
tion if necessary. They will 
almost always provide sig- 
nificant improvement. 
These methods are: 1) 
Shielded-loop antennas; 2) 
High-Q antennas; 3) Noise- 
cancelling antennas. Let's 
look at these one by one. 

Incidentally, these anten- 



-~ — LOOP SHIELD 



BOLT 



SOCT 



a »-* — ~ 




2 t4 



TO 

RECEDE R 



Fig. 2. A method of azimuth/elevation mounting that allows 
the shielded loop to be pointed towards the focal direction 
of a noise source. This kind of mount is practical only up to 
a certain size— about an d-foot-diameter loop. The loop 
shield should be constructed from copper tubing if this 
kind of mounting is used. 



nas are for receiving only If 
you have a transceiver, 
some sort of switching de- 
vice, such as a relay, will 
have to be used. These an- 
tennas will all prove quite 
lousy for transmitting. 

The Shielded Loop 

Fig. 1 shows two types of 
shielded-loop antennas. Fig. 
1(a) is a schematic diagram 
of a single-turn loop, which 
may be constructed from 
coaxial cable. The loop is 
tuned to resonance by ca- 
pacitor C, which may be a 
common 365-pF receiving- 
type variable available at 
most Radio Shack stores. It 
may be necessary to paral- 
lel this capacitor with a 
330-pF fixed capacitor if 
resonance cannot be ob- 
tained with the variable by 
itself. 

The loop should have an 
overall circumference of 
about 0.15 wavelength. Es- 
sentially, it is a single-band 
affair. If used on a band 
much lower than where it is 
0.15 wavelength, the anten- 
na will not pick up signals 
very well If used on a much 
higher frequency, the an- 
tenna will pick up more 
noise. Nevertheless, you 



can probably get away with 
using it at half the design 

frequency and still get fair 
results. The loop may be 
placed on an "X" brace 
made out of wooden dow- 
els or 2 by 4s, taped to an in- 
side closet wall, or even put 
up in a tree. 

The "shielding" of the 
loop obviously is not com- 
plete. Actually, it is electro- 
static (Faraday) shielding, 
which shorts out the electric 
component of the signal 
while letting the magnetic 
part pass. For some reason, 
man-made noise seems to 
be transmitted mostly by 
capacitive coupling, as an 
electric field. But signals 
have both a magnetic and 
electric component. The re- 
sult is that the noise gets at- 
tenuated more than the sig- 
nals. 

At Fig. 1{b), we have a 
multi-turn shielded anten- 
na. The overall physicakcir- 
cumference should still be 
0.1 5 wavelength. The shield 
may be constructed out of 
copper or aluminum tub- 
ing. The loop should have 
four to six turns; too many 
turns will lower the Q of the 
antenna and this will ad- 
versely affect its noise per- 

73 Magazine * January, 1963 57 




FREQUENCY' 




-•— FftEOUEKCV - 

Fig. 3. Effect of increasing 
the Qof an antenna system, 
(a) The antenna system has 
essentially no selectivity. 
The signal at frequency f^ 
is buried in the noise, (b) A 
selective circuit is used in 
the antenna system. The to- 
tal amount of noise (area 
under the curve) is smaller 
and this results in fewer 
high-order mixing product s, 
which actually reduces the 
noise level at f Q . But the 
signal level remains un- 
changed, improving the sig- 
nal-to-noise ratio. 







TO RECEIVER 



Fig. 4. A ferrite loopstick 
antenna with multiple taps. 
The taps should be chosen 
so that C may be adjusted 
for resonance on each band 
used. See text for discussion 
of inductance values. 



formance, (Part of the noise 
attenuation of the shielded 
loop is the result of its high 
Q, which we wilt discuss lat- 
er.) Several turns, however, 
provide for more "sensitivi- 
ty" than just one. One word 
of warning: It is a physical 
contortion of considerable 
difficulty to find a way to 
get several turns through 
the tubing without a good 
deal of cussing and high 
blood pressure. 

Table 1 gives the circum- 
ference of an 0.15-wave- 
length loop at various fre- 
quencies. The loop may be 
a square, pentagon, hex- 
agon, octagon, or perfect 
circle. The circle is geomet- 
rically best A long, skinny 
rectangle will not work too 
welk You should try to get 
the largest possible area for 
the circumference allowed, 
and keep it all in the same 
plane. 

58 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



A shielded loop does 
have a directional pattern, 
The antenna will respond to 
signals in any direction ex- 
cept right along the axis. 
There is a sharp null in the 
line of the axis, The null is 
so sharp that signals propa- 
gated via the sky wave will 
never fall into it because of 
their multipath nature Lo- 
cal signals might possibly 
fail into the null; just move 
the antenna a little and 
they'll come up. Of course, 
the noise can be nulled out 
if the antenna is oriented 
just right. This will provide 
even more attenuation to 
an already weakened foe. 

Nulling It Out 

The noise that is causing 
you so much frustration 
may originate in a single de- 
vice, but it is probably be- 
ing transmitted all over the 
place by the ac power lines 
Therefore, it may be com- 
ing from all around. Howev- 
er, noise will always have a 
focal direction. Mathemati- 
cally, all the noise com- 
bines in such a way that it 
may be considered to be 
coming from one single di- 
rection. (It's sort of like 
gravity. Even parts of the 
Earth that aren't straight un- 
der you are pulling at you, 
but it all averages out to a 
straight down force) This 
axiom holds true as long as 
it's only one fluorescent 
light, thermostat, or elm 
tree that is responsible. If 



there are two independent 
culprits, each one will have 
its own focal direction, and 
you won't be able to null 
them both out at once. But 
chances are that there is on- 
ly one source of noise. {It is 
just too horrible to even 
consider that there might 
be more!) 

Fig. 2 shows a method of 
mounting a shielded loop 
so that its null can be 
pointed in any direction 
The focal direction might 
even be straight overhead, 
so the antenna must be 
capable of pointing in the 
vertical as well as the 
horizontal plane. The XYL 
won't let you put such a 
contraption in the living 
room? Well, try the attic or 
the backyard, then. Or even 
the roof. 

It may take some time to 
find the focal direction of 
the noise, since the antenna 
null is so sharp. But once 
you've found it, there may 
be as much as a 20-dB drop 
in the noise level — and this 
is in addition to the im- 
provement that results 
from the electrostatic 
shielding. Now you should 
be able to hear some sig- 
nals. Let that guy's refriger- 
ator run until it burns itself 
out. 

High-Q Antennas: 
The Ferrite Loopstick 

Man-made noise differs 
in another way from signals. 
The signal you want to hear 
is never more than 3 kHz 
wide on the HF bands (un- 
less you want to listen to 
AM shortwave music broad- 
casts, which take up about 
10 kHz). The noise, howev- 
er, is hundreds or even 
thousands of kHz wide. 

The higher the Q (the nar- 
rower the bandwidth) of the 
antenna system, the smaller 
the total amount of noise 
that gets into the receiver 
But that little 3-kHz signal 
will all be passed. This ef- 
fect is shown in Fig. 3. The 
less total noise that gets to 
the receiver front end, the 



less noise that will appear 
within that 3-kHz signal 
"window/' since there will 
be a lower level of high- 
order mixing products 
Thus, the signal-to-noise 
ratio will be better 

The shielded-loop anten- 
na, discussed earlier, has a 
fairly high Q. It can be max- 
imized by using a single 
turn of very heavy wire in- 
side a piece of tubing, or 
else by using RG-8/U coax- 
ial cable for the loop sec- 
tion. A preamplifier with rf 
tuning may be added at the 
receiver input with any an- 
tenna in order to increase 
the Q, There are several 
commercially made units 
available. Ameco Equip- | 
ment Company (12033 Ot- j| 
sego Street, North Holly- 
wood CA 91607) makes one 
called the PT-2 that tunes 
160 through 6 meters. I 

An antenna with very i 
high Q can be constructed 
using a ferrite rod. Just wind 
several turns of enameled | 
copper wire on the ferrite 
core from the antenna in 
Aunt jenny's at-last-useful i 
AM transistor job. Ferrite 
sticks are available com- 
mercially from Amidon As- 
sociates (275 Hillside Ave- » 
nue, Williston Park NY 
11596). The coil should be ' 
tuned to resonance using a I 
variable capacitor Fig 4 
shows a multiband ferrite 
antenna system with multi- 
ple taps. | 

The exact number of 
turns that will provide reso* 
nance on the desired band 
using a 365-pF variable ca- 
pacitor at C will have to be 
found by trial and error, i 
unless there is data includ- 
ed showing inductance vs. 
number of turns for your 
particular stick, Table 2 
shows the values of indue 
tance that will provide reso- 
nance with 200 pF of capac- 
itance (about the middle of 
the range of a 365-pF vari- 
able) at various frequen- 
cies. 

A ferrite antenna, com- 
plete with azimuth/eleva- 
tion mount and a built-in 



80M IN 24 FT! 



^\ \^ % 



W 



Put a broad bandwidth BOM dipole in 24 ft with the 
SLINKY DIPOLE* antenna. Comparable low SWR, space 
savings and performance on ALL HF bands, including 
SWL and WARC. Complete krt; 2 special 4" coifs, 50' 
RG-58/U coax, balun kit mounting hardware and 
instructions. Great for apartments, condominiums, motels 
and vacation use. Easy set up and adjustment, 

Ask for FREE antenna comparison sheet 



Blacksburg Group 

Box 242 Suite 500 
Bfacksburg, Virginia 24060 
703/95 J -9030 



118 



49.95 postpaid (in USA.) 

Money Back Guarantee 
Virginia residents >/ 
ado 4% safes tax If 





^fM^r 




ORBIT is the Official Journal for the 
Radio Amateur Satellite corporation 
(AMSAT), P.O. Box 27, Washington, DC 
20047. Please write for application. 

For a FREE SAMPLE COPY please 

send $1 to cover First Class Postage 
and handling to: Orbit, 221 Long 
Swamp Road, woicott, CT 06716. 




Universal 

Communications 



A Division of 
innovative Labs, inc. 



KIT#1 



DOWNCONVERTER 

VARIABLE POWER SUPPLY 

CIGAR ANTENNA 

• Kit Special — buy all three 

SAVE $10.00 



...$19.95 
...$19.95 

• t » y I W ■ V w 

. . . $49.95 



KIT #2 



DOWNCONVERTER 

VARIABLE POWER SUPPLY 
KD 44 DISH ANTENNA 

* Kit Special — buy all three. . . 

SAVE $7.90 



ASSEMBLED SPECIAL 



ASSEMBLED DOWNCONVERTER 

ASSEMBLED VARIABLE 

POWER SUPPLY 

• Assembled special — 

buy all three 

SAVE $10.00 



$19.95 
$19.95 
$47.95 
$79.95 



$39.95 

$29.95 
$19.95 

$79.95 



Gkeat (lift Sfceas for tlte 
iHolibatj ^easnn 



SUPERVERTER I assembled only $109.95 

crystal not included 

SELECTIVE PREAMPLIFIER $26.95 

HIGH CAIN TRANSISTOR $6.95 

DRIFT MODIFICATION $1.25 

KD44 DISH ANTENNA $47.95 

1691 Downconverter, built 
& tested only . . . call for price 

For information or ordering 

(817)860-1641 

Hours, 8:30-5:00 CST; Mon.-Frl. 



,*See List of Advertisers on page tit 




73 Magazine * January. 1983 59 



Frequency 


Inductance 


MHz 


JiH 


1.8 


39 


3.5 


10 


7 


2.6 


10 


13 


14 


0.65 


18 


0.39 


21 


0.29 


24 


0.22 


28 


0.16 



Table 2. Inductance re- 
quired to resonate with 200 
pF of capacitance (the mid- 
dle range of a 365-pF vari- 
able) at various frequencies. 
This data may be used in 
conjunction with data pro- 
vided with commercially 
available ferrite rods, for the 
purpose of making a ferrite 
ioopstick antenna. 



preamplifier, is available 
from Palomar Engineers 
(Box 455, Escondido CA 
92025) at the time of writ- 
ing. 

The ferrite Ioopstick is 
not electrostatically shield- 
ed, but it does tend to favor 
inductive coupling over ca- 
pacitive. It is easier to work 
with mechanical ly, espe- 
cially at lower frequencies. 
Simply orient the Ioopstick 
until a null occurs in the 
noise background. The null 
will be very sharp. 

Need this last comment 
be made? Let's not take any 
chances Don't try using a 
toroid core for this antenna. 
It won't work. 

Noise-Cancelling Antennas 

There's still another char- 
acteristic of noise that 
makes it different from sig- 
nals. Oddly enough, this is 
the very resemblance of 
noise to a signal, with a 
unique focal direction. You 
hear the noise on the same 
frequency as a given signal. 
the noise may be thought of 
as a local signal. As such, 
using two antennas to com- 
bine the noise in opposite 
phase, the noise can be 
"cancelled out" 

Fig, 5 illustrates one such 
system. The spacing be- 
tween the two inductively- 
loaded vertical dipoles 



need not be very great, but 
it should be as large as prac- 
tical without exceeding a 
quarter wavelength. The el- 
ements themselves may be 
very short In fact, shorten- 
ing them increases the Q, 
which will add to the noise* 
reducing effectiveness. 

One antenna is fed 180 
degrees out of phase with 
respect to the other. The 
easiest way to do this is to 
make the phasing lines the 
same length, but feed one 
of the antennas upside 
down with respect to the 
other. That is, if one anten- 
na has the feedline center 
conductor going to the top 
section, the other antenna 
should have its feedline go- 
ing to the bottom. In the 
plane equidistant from the 
two antennas, phase can- 
cellation will occur. This is 
a vertically-oriented plane, 
and by rotating the entire 
system through 180 de- 
grees, any focal direction 
can be put into the null 
plane. 

It is possible, but not like- 
ly, that a signal will arrive 
from a direction that lies in 
the same plane as the noise, 
once the noise has been 
cancelled out. Sky-wave 
signals, since they arrive 
from a varying direction 
(ionospheric shift), may 
fade more if this happens. 
Local signals will be attenu- 
ated considerably. 

This particular kind of 
antenna is mentioned here 
to illustrate the third way 
that signals can be distin- 
guished from noise. As de- 
scribed, it will not work as 
well as the shielded loop or 
the ferrite antenna. But this 
scheme could conceivably 
be used with two shielded 
loops or ferrite antennas! 
Actually, pointing these 
two types of antennas at 
the focal direction of the 
noise is a means of phase 
cancellation. But even 
more cancellation could be 
obtained by using two such 
antennas, both pointed at 
the focal direction of the 
noise and then combined 



FEED 

POINT 




LOADING 
COILS 






MAST 



Fig. 5. Using two antennas to obtain phase cancellation of 
the noise. This particular system uses two inductively- 
loaded vertical dipoles. This system is illustrated primarily 
to demonstrate the third difference between signals and 
noise; this antenna by itself will not work as well as a shield* 
ed loop or a ferrite antenna. 



so that the small amount of 
remaining noise from each 
antenna arrives at the re- 
ceiver in opposing phase. 

Which One? 

In a noisy environment, 
probably the best choice is 
the shielded loop. Using a 
selective preamplifier, one 
shielded loop can be used 
on several bands; it should 
be constructed for the high- 
est band used. On lower fre- 
quencies, the value of ca- 
pacitor C will have to be in- 
creased by paralleling it 
with fixed capacitors. The 
preamplifier will allow re- 
ception on lower bands be- 
cause of its gain, 

Perhaps there is no good 
place to put a shielded loop 
with azimuth/elevation 
mounting, and you can't get 
enough noise attenuation 
unless the antenna can be 
oriented towards the focal 
direction of the noise. Then, 
the next best choice is the 
ferrite Ioopstick. It can be 
put right at the operating 
desk! The ferrite antenna 
will probably not be quite 
as effective as a shielded 
loop. The null will not be as 
well defined (though still 
quite sharp) and its discrimi- 
nation against electrostatic 
coupling will not be quite 
as good. But it can still be 
used to advantage. 



Conclusion 

Noise differs from signals 
in three ways: 1) Noise is 
transferred mostly by elec- 
trostatic coupling, but sig- 
nals are transferred by elec- 
tromagnetic fields; 2) Noise 
is broadbanded, but signals 
occupy only a small part of 
the spectrum; 3) Noise has a 
unique and usually con- 
stant focal direction at a 
given frequency, and it will 
usually be in a different fo- 
cal direction than desired 
signals. These three differ- 
ences are taken advantage 
of by: 1) Faraday shielding; 

2) High-Q antenna circuits; 

3) Phase cancellation. 
These three methods of 

dealing with noise may be 
used individually or in com- 
bination. A shielded loop 
with azimuth/elevation 
mounting takes advantage 
of all three of the differ- 
ences between signals and 
noise, It has electrostatic 
shielding, has a high Q, and 
may be oriented to null out 
the noise, A ferrite loop can 
be used when the shielded 
loop is impractical because 
of space limitations, either 
in reality or in the imagina- 
tion of an XYL or landlord. 
Good tuck! Carry on the 
search for the noise source 
by all means But at least 
get on the air in the mean- 
time. ■ 



60 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



Introducing our Latest Model — NOV AX II 

— - SIMPLEX / DUPLEX 

AUTOPATCH 



HOVAXI 




NOV AX II 



NOW TWO MODELS TO 
SERVE YOU BETTER 

YOUR OWN PRIVATE AUTOPATCH 



Mobile Connection 




NO VAX interface* your standard z meter, 220; 450: etc Baw 
station arid telephone, using a high speed scan twitching tech* 
nique so (hat you can direct diet from your automobile or with 
your HT from the backyard or poolside — Automatically ~, Easy 
installation transceivers, featuring solid state switching, offer beat 
.. Available interfaced with an ICOM 22U 



MATURES 


MOV AX 1 


NOV AX II 


• 3 nun. Call dunttcm tinw 


YES 


YES 


* Up to *5 hc acttvitv timer 


YES 


YES 


* Sin^f* cftpf Accm Control 


YES 


NO 


* OTMF CToucti Tgrw}* pnona connect ion 


YES 


YES 


+ 4 diQtt Aeon Control 


NO 


YES 


* Toll Hvilnct 


NO 


YES 




• LED Digital Qnplay 


NO 


YES 


• Vinyl covered tlum. case lize 


S' J * 8" x 2" 


10"x8"k1V 


* Directly Interfaces with RflpMtar 


NO 


Yea 


• HoiMrt Dial Svflam Unci. U»t dJflil dial) 


NO 


YES- " Opt i on' -S4&9G 


* Rn*g Back frnvne sutopatcli) "OpllOA" 


Y£S-*3a95: Ku S2P.95 


YES-WPF*d-S39 r 95 


■Pnoi 


K it, 1*69.95, wired $71 OS6 


W.retf only «279,96 


H. V £. rWL add appro. S»k« Ttx EH 1 PP 1 NG A D *3,60 in U.SJL 



»<"21 



To OrO>r, asnd 
cn*cfc. money 
order id. 



wiAACQPrm 




Box 162 - Tudman Rd. 
WaAmoratand. NT 13*90 
tfr A.W.0. * KJ w f * hon » 31*-«*^W 



III 



YOU 
KNOW 

THIS MAN? 



Wanted 




Reward! 



He is a leader in Ihe community, at home, at wotK and in Ham Radio. He 
could be a Brass Founder, a dyeo4n^he-wool phone man, an avki DXer. a 
staunch VHFer or maybe he's just nuts about RTTY or ATV. Maybe he or she 
is lurking in your household, posing as a husband, wife, father, brother, sister, 
or even your next door ne*ohbor or someone just down the block This shad- 
owy unknown person is sought to join an impressive group of formerly unrec- 
ognized hams including such notables as Ed Tilton, W1HDQ and Senator 
Barry Goldwater , K7UGA 

Have you guessed who we're searching for? Right . . . It's the "Ham of the 
Year r ' lo be honored at the Dayton Hamvention on April 30, 1963. If you know 
this person, why not grab a pen and turn him or her In for a great reward. Get 
all the facts— fully detailed— and send in your nomination NOW. This award 
Is not for one-time achievement, but for continued all-around outstanding per- 
formance and contribution to civic and Ham activities 

There is a separate award for one-time special achievements including DX- 
peditions, emergency work, or excellence in some technical area of Ham 
Radio So If you fee* you know some worthy Ham who should be recognized 
tor his work why not give him a chance and send in a nomination now to the 
Dayton Hamvention. There are many amateurs in our ranks deserving our rec- 
ognition. All that's needed is someone to nominate them. Who knows, you 
may have a winner in your own backyard . . Hurry . , . deadline for all nomina- 
tions is April I, 1963. ALL NOMINATIONS AND CORRESPONDENCE FOR 
FURTHER INFORMATION SHOULD BE SENT TO: 

Dayton Hamvention 

ATTN: AWARDS CHAIRMAN 
P.O. BOX 44 DAYTON OHIO 45401 



1 



HAL'S NEW YEAR'S SPECIALS 



HAL 2304 MHz DOWN CONVERTERS rFREO RANGE 2000/2500 MHz) 

2304 MODEL #1 KIT BASIC UNIT WfPREAMP LESS HOUSING & FITTINGS ....,, 119,95 

2304 MODEL #2 KrT( with preamp> T 

2SM MODEL #3 KfTiwilh High Gain r>rearnp> 

MODELS 2 4 3 WITH COAX FFTHNGS IN & OUT AND WTTH WEATHER-PROOFED DIE 
CAST HOUSINGS 

BASIC POWtn SUPPLY . . . . . . ... . . . ». . . ,+,,,,.»,,*.,*.*, , , *■.,»*»•»■ alaVJv 

POWER SUPPLY KIT FOR ABOVE WFTH CASE . . . $24,35 

FACTORY WIRED* TESTED , i; ,..., $34,95 

ANTENNAS ft OTHER ACCESSORIES AVAILABLE, SEND FOR MORE iNFO. 

2100-2500 MHZ 

"HMR^I COMPLETE, UNIT 

COMPLETE SYSTEM AS SHOWN, NOT A KIT. INCLUDES 

A PC BOARD. POWER SUPPLY, CABLES 4 

GONNECTORS-PRE-ASSEMBLED AND TESTED 24dB 

GAIN OR GREATER 

t UNIT. „..„..„ tf 4B.05 

2 UNITS. Ii3»,&5 h. 

30R MORE UNITS $125,95 

•HAM MICROWAVE RECEIVER 




PRE-SCALER KITS 

HAL 300 PRE ( Pre«Jnl led friODoard and ail components* 

HAL 300 A PRE (Same as above but wilh prearnpl. . 

HAL 600 PRE (Pffrdri lied G-10 board and all components! 

HAL 600 A/PAE ......... (same as above but with preamp) . . . . 



$14.95 
S29J6 



TOUCH TONE DECODER KIT 

HEGHLY STABLE DECODER KIT. COMES WITH 2 SlOED. PLATED THRU AND SOLDER 
FLOWED G-10 PC BOARD, 7-567'S, 2-7402. AND ALL ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS, 
BOARD MEASURES 3*1/2 x 5-1/2 INCHES. HAS 12 LINES OUT, ONLY13&J6 

NEW— 16 LINE DELUXE DECODER $39.95 

DELUXE 12-BUTTON TOUCHTONE ENCODER KIT UTILIZING THE NEW ICM 7206 CHIP 
PROVIDES BOTH VISUAL AND AUDIO INDICATIONS! COMES WITH ITS OWN TWO- 
TONE ANODIZED ALUMINUM CABINET MEASURES 0NLY2Vj -j<3tt "COMPLETE WITH 
TOUCH-TONE PAD BOARD, CRYSTAL CHIP AND ALL NECESSARY COMPONENTS TO 
FINISH THE KIT. PRrCEO AT $29,95 



NEW— 16 UNE DELUXE ENCODER 

HAL ECD— 16 LINE DELUXE ENCODER INCLUDES PC BOARD, ALL PARTS & CASE 



HAL ECD— 12 LINE DELUXE ENCODER COMPLETE WITH PC BOARD. ALL PARTS * 
CASE 




ACCUKEYEfl [KIT) THIS ACCUKEYER IS A REVISED VERSION OF THE VERY POPULAR 
WB4WF AOCUKEYEH ORIGINALLY DESCRIBED BY JAMES GARRETT, IN QST 
MAGAZINE AND THE 1975 RA04O AMATEUR'S HANDBOOK I1&95 

ACCUKEYER— MEMORY OPTION KIT PROVIDES A SIMPLE, LOW COST METHOD OF 
ADOING MEMORY CAPABILITY TO THE WB4WF ACCUKEYER WHILE DESIGNED FOR 
DIRECT ATTACHMENT TO THE ABOVE ACCUKEYER. IT CAN ALSO BE ATTACHED TO 
ANY STANDARD ACCUKEYEH BOARD WITH LITTLE DIFFICULTY $1&&5 

BUY BOTH THE MEMORY AND THE KEYEH AND SAVE 

COMBINED PRICE ONLY $32.00 

PRE- AMPLIFIER 

HALPA 19 WIDE BAND PRE- AMPLIFIER. 2-200 MH* BANDWIDTH ( - 3dB POINTS), 19 dB 
GAIN 

FULLY ASSEMBLED AND TESTED S&&S 

HAL PA 1.4 WIDE BAND PRE AMPLIFIER, 10 MHz TO 1.4 GHz. 12dB GAIN 

FULLY ASSEMBLED S1£*$ 

CLOCK KIT^HAL79FOUR4>lGrTSP£CIAL-t7J6tOP 

ERATES ON 12 VOLT AC (NOT SUPPLIED, PROVISIONS FOR DC 
AND ALARM OPERATION. 

6-DIGIT CLOCKM2/24 HOUR 

COMPLETE KIT CONSISTING OF 2 PC G-10 PRE-DRILLED PC BOARDS. 1 CLOCK 
CHIP 6 FND COMM CATR READOUTS, 13 TRANS.. 3 CAPS, 9 RESISTORS, 5 DtODES. 
3 PUSHBUTTON SWITCHES AND INSTRUCTIONS DONT BE FOOLED BY PARTIAL 
KfTS WHERE YOU HAVE TO BUY EVERYTHING EXTRA WILL RUN OFF ANY 12 VOLT 
AC SUPPLY. PRICED AT $12.95 

CLOCK CASE AVAILABLE AND WILLRT ANY ONE OF THE ABOVE CLOCKS. REGULAR 
PRICE . . . $6 50 BUT ONY 14.50 WHEN BOUGHT WITH CLOCK. 

SIX-DIGIT ALARM CLOCK KIT FOR HOME, CAMPER, RV, OR FfELD-DAY USE, 
OPERATES ON 12-VOLT AC OR DC H AND HAS ITS OWN fiO-Hz TIME BASE ON THE 
BOARD- COMPLETE WITH ALL ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AND TWaPIECE, PRE- 
DRILLED PC BOARDS. BOARD SIZE 4" x 3". COMPLETE WiTH SPEAKER AND 
SWITCHES. IF OPERATED ON DC, THERE IS NOTHING MORE TO BUY* 

PRICED AT *t ftJBS 

■TWELVE-VOLT AC UNE CORD FOR THOSE WHO WISH TO OPERATE THE CLOCK 
FROM 1 10-VOLT AC WHEN PURCHASED WITH CLOCXKfTSZSS 

SHIPPING INFORMATION ORDERS OVER S25 WILL BE SHIPPED POSTPAID EXCEPT 
ON ITEMS WHERE ADDITIONAL CHARGES ARE REOUESTED, ON ORDERS LESS THAN 
$25, PLEASE INCLUDE ADDTTlONAL $2.00 FOR HANDLING AND MAIUNG CHARGES 
S&J0 20* STAMP FOR FREE FLYER DISTRIBUTOR FOR 

Alum* l om mnAP Product* 
a rWe rw*e the ne* Hobby Btoi Syttami 





**31 



HAL 



HAIOLD C NOWLAND 
WBZXH 



HalTronix 

P.O. BOX 1101 

SOUTHGATE, MICH. 48195 

PHONE (313) 296-1782 



See Ltst of Advertisers on page ti4 



73 Magazine * January, 1983 61 



mmm 



Charles t Hetster K3VDB 
11 5 Dixie Drive 
Red Lion PA 17356 



The Care and Feeding 
of Optoelectronics 

There are many ways to make these devices earn their keep. 

Here is one. 



Can you really see which 
way the wind is blow- 
ing with optoelectronics? 

The answer to that ques- 
tion is yes — with a little 
help from you 

The subject of this article 
is General Electrics H21A1 



photo-coupler interrupter 
module This module has 
two components: an in- 
frared LED light source 
called the emitter, and a 
photo transistor called the 
detector 

I think you are safe in 




Photo A. Wind-direction indicator with the weather cov- 
er removed, 

62 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



believing this so far, be- 
cause I just read it in an 
optoelectronics manual. 

The H21A1 module has a 
gap in its housing. The emit- 
ter is mounted on one side 
of the gap and the detector 
on the other You may think 
someone planned it that 
way because now, if you 



want to, you can make this 
little black thing do some- 
thing to earn its keep. For 
instance, if you pass some- 
thing opaque through the 
gap, you will interrupt the 
output of the emitter Do 
you think that's why CE 
calls it a photo-coupler in- 
terrupter module? 




DUPLICATE THIS CIRCUIT 
8 TIMES 



REGULATOR 




MTV l?6V 



Fig, 7, The H21A1, detector side, is not shown physically 
correctly drawn here— look on top of the device for the cor- 
rect pinout Alt resistors are 1/4 Watt; capacitors are yF, 



The interrupter module is 
just one of many types of 
photo couplers. To mention 
a few, the reflector module 
could be used somewhat 
like the interrupter modute 
except that the light source 
must be bounced off a re- 
flective surface and back 
to the detector. There are 
discrete emitter and detec- 
tor units, and also a whole 
family of optocouplers in 
which the emitter and de- 
tector are sealed into one 
cube with no way of any- 
thing getting between 
them, which offer as high as 
4000-volts isolation be- 
tween the input and the 
output I have mentioned 
but a few that are available 
(most of them cheap). And 
that brings me to the reason 
for my taking your time 
whife you read this, 

My purpose is to tell you 
how I used an interrupter- 
type module in a project 
and to get you interested 
enough to think about using 
optoelectronics in your 
next project The more you 
know about them the more 



jobs you will see that they 

can do for you . 

I sort of hinted at the 
beginning that I know how 
to make the H21A1 (actual- 
ly, 8 of them) tell which way 
the wind is blowing, so I 
better get to it. The con- 
struction part is a mix of 
electronics and mechanics, 
The device, in case you 
haven't guessed, is a wind- 
direction indicator. 

As you can see in the 
photos, there are some ma- 
chined parts used on the 
model. Don't let this scare 
you; in afmost every case, 
there is an alternative way 
to fabricate the same part 
with hand tools. I will sug- 
gest ways as we go along. 
On the other hand, the fel- 
low with a lathe or machine 
shop could have a good 
time developing this proj- 
ect even further. The model 
pictured here has been 
perfected only to the point 
that it works reliably in all 
weather experienced here 
in Pennsylvania, and it 
should continue to work for 




many years. That is to say, 
don't be afraid to use the 
ideas and hardware avail- 
able to you. 

The most important 
points to remember when 
planning your construction 
are that (1 ) the bearing fric- 
tion should be low enough 
so that a gentle breeze will 
have enough force on the 
tail of the vane to keep it 
headed into the wind, (2) 
you must devise a way of 
mounting it to your tower 
or pole, and (3) when it's 
all finished you must have 
some means of weather- 
sealing it. 

Photo A shows the wind- 
direction indicator fully as- 
sembled except for the 

weather cover. The \/^ne 
boom is 3/16 x 12-inches- 
long aircraft aluminum rod. 
(I might mention at this 
time that all parts were 
made from T3 aluminum.) 
The tail is 1/16 X 6 inches 
and has just about 13 
square inches of surface. 
The vane boom is mounted 
to the axle or vertical shaft 
2/3 of the length of the 
boom in front of the tail, or 
1/3 of the way back of the 
nose. So, to balance this 
boom, the nose must be 
proportionately heavier 
than the tail. The nose is 1 
X 3 inches long and is 



threaded onto the boom. A 
1/16-inch slit has been 
milled into the boom to ac- 
cept the tail, but a flat sur- 
face filed on the boom with 
the tail screwed to it would 
be just as good. The nose 
could be epoxied to the 
boom if there is no thread- 
ing tool available. 

The axte or vertical shaft 
is a 1/4 x 9-inch rod with a 
a 3/16-inch hole drilled in it 
near the top to accept the 
vane boom. A hole was 
drilled and tapped into the 
end of the shaft down 
through the vane boom and 
on into the shaft another 
half inch to secure the 
boom to the shaft. 

Photo B is an exploded 
view. It shows the next com- 
ponent on the way down 
the shaft— the top bearing 
weather seal. This rotates 
with the shaft and, together 
with a piece of pipe that is 
epoxied to the top support 
frame, prevents the ele- 
ments from getting into the 
bearing. 

The top support frame is 
4-7/16 inches deep (as 
\ iewed in Photo B) and 4-5/8 
inches wide. It provides a 
mounting surface in the 
back and was formed from 
1/8-inch stock. The back 
two corners were welded 
for strength, The inner bear- 




Photo B, An exploded view with the vane boom removed. 



Photo C A view of the H21Als mounted on their fiberglass 
substrate and the disc interrupter tab rotating through the 
H21A1 gap. Mounted underneath is the PC board with the 
rest of the circuit components, 

73 Magazine • January, 1983 63 





Photo D. The eight H21A1s in a 1-1 7/16" circle (measured to 
the center of the gapl 



Photo E, The electronic components mounted on what we 
call a "do air PC hoard. The pencil is pointed at one of the 
ten pins used to terminate the cable coming from the read- 
out LEDs in the shack. The component at 10:00 o'clock near 
the shaft hole that looks like an overweight disc capacitor is 
the MOV, 



ing seal is 3/4-inch i.d. con- 
duit 1-1/8 inches high. The 
outer bearing seal is 5/8- 
inches id x 1-3/8 inches 
high. 

The next component 
down the shaft is the top 
bearing. I used ball bear- 
ings pressed into a bearing 
block to facilitate mount- 
ing and alignment, but a 
neat hole in a hunk of brass 
would be just as good. It 
would then be smart to use 
a brass or steel shaft, be- 
cause brass and aluminum 
don't get along, especially 
out in the weather. 

The next component 
down the shaft is the disc 
interrupter. It rotates with 
the shaft and is the compo- 
nent that actually tells the 
optoelectronics interrupter 
module which way the wind 
is blowing. (More about 
that later.) The disc inter- 
rupter used in this model 
was machined from a piece 
of solid round stock. As 
seen in Photo C it is merely 
a disc with a collar and set 
screw to secure it to the 
shaft, and with a right angle 
tab on it An easier way to 
make the disc would be to 
use the top portion of a 

64 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



small soup can and epoxy a 
collar to the top to secure it 

to the shaft. My disc-inter- 
rupter tab runs in a 
1-11/16-inch circle and is 
3/8-inch deep. The width of 
the tab is cut so that it 
covers two interrupter 
modules, (More about that 
later,) The H21A1's gap is 
3/32-inch wide so I made 
the tab 1 /16-inch thick 

Photo D is a top view of 
the heart of the whole 
thing, the eight H21A1 
interrupter modules mount- 
ed in their circle on a piece 
of fiberglass epoxy board 
1/Snnch thick X 3-1/4 inch- 
es square This would have 
been a perfect situation in 
which to design and etch a 
printed circuit board. At the 
time, however, I did not 
have on hand PC board ma- 
terial thick enough to do 
the job. I think it should be 
at least 1/8-inch-thick stock 
to get the thermal and me- 
chanical stability needed. 

As you can see in Photo 
E, I used a piece of Radio 
Shack "do all" board. The 
leads from the H21A1s 
were stuck through the 
board and soldered 
first, to set the spacing be- 



tween the two boards. Then 
the positive bus (near the 
center of the board) and the 
negative bus (around the 
outside of the board) were 
put down After that, it's 
just as the schematic 
shows. The pencil in Photo 
E is pointing to the terminal 
pin on the negative bus. 
There are 10 pins on the 
board; two are for power 
(+5 V and -5 V), and the 
other eight are the direction 
signals that are being sent 
down to the wind direction 
LED readout in the shack 
The male pins on the board 
will mate with female pins 
on the end of the cable go- 
ing to the shack. 

I tried various methods 
of reducing the number 
of conductors needed in 
the interconnection cable, 
BCD, etc, but when the 
smoke cleared (get it?), two 
runs of inexpensive 5-con- 
ductor TV-antenna rotor 
wire were found to work 
fine. 

The eight H21A1s are 
spaced every 45° around 
the circle. Consequently, 
with the eight LEDs placed 
on the compass rose in the 
shack, you are able to de- 



termine if the wind is out of 
the north, northeast east, 
southeast, south, south- 
west, west, or northwest 
merely by observing the 
LEDs. However, by making 
the disc interrupter tab 
wide enough to cover two 
adjacent interrupter mod- 
ules, two LEDs are lit, So, for 
example, if the south and 
the southeast LEDs are lit, 
we can assume that the 
wind is out of the south- 
southeast or approximate- 
ly 157°. Obviously, more 
H21A1s could be added to 
increase the resolution. At 
this point some method of 
reducing the number of ca- 
ble conductors between the 
aerial unit and the readout 
panel would be necessary. 

The electronic theory is 
super simple. When the disc 
interrupter tab interrupts 
the emitter light source, the 
photo transistor turns off, 
turning the 2N3904 off, 
hence allowing the appro- 
priate LED to light. 

Any 5-volt power supply 
that can deliver at least 500 
mA continuously will work. 
The General Electric MOV 
is for transient voltage- 
spike protection, I used the 



V47ZA7 because I had 
them; a better choice could 
be made 

So far, there has been no 
need for rf suppression, but 
that is not to say you may 
not need to add a bypass 
capacitor or two. 

The next to last thing on 
the shaft is the 1/4-inch col- 
lar. It is secured to the shaft 
with a set screw and rests 
on top of the lower bearing. 
It prevents the shaft from 
falling through. As you can 
see in Photo B, the collar is 
not in place because this is 
an exploded view. 

Photo F shows an explod- 
ed view with the 3-3/4-inch 
spacer screws removed 
from the bottom plate. You 
also can see the four small 
3/4-inch spacers on the bot- 
tom of the bottom bearing 
plate, These spacers will be 
used to secure the weather 
cover. 

All of the spacers could 
be substituted for with all- 
thread rod, and then you 
would use the nuts to adjust 




Photo F. An exploded view from the front looking up at the 
wind-direction indicator. 



your spacing. The bottom 

bearing and bearing bfock 
are identical to the top 
bearing and bearing block. 
The weather cover is 
nothing more than a five- 
sided box that slides up 
over the lower bearing 
plate and butts against a 
cork gasket glued to the 
bottom side of the top sup- 
port frame (gasket or cover 



not pictured), A fruit or 
soup can of the proper size 
also would work for a 
weather cover 

After the machine was 
fully assembled and tested, 
I disassembled it so that I 
could wash all the metal 
parts with dishwashing de- 
tergent. Then everything 
was sprayed with clear Kry- 
Ion™, including the elec- 



£ 




s 



Fig. 2* Here is your ready-to-use compass rose! 



Ironies board but exclud- 
ing the H21A1 board. 

Photo G is a view of the 
wind-direction readout 
panel with its eight LEDs, 
etc. On a sub-panel on the 
rear, the power-supply com- 
ponents and cable terminal 
blocks are located. On the 
right is the companion 
meter that I hope in the 
near future will indicate 
wind velocity (not ac 
Amps). My plans for this 
meter as they stand now are 
to perfect a 4-inch cup ane- 
mometer to the point that it 
will indicate wind velocity 
with the additional feature 
of generating 7 to 10 Watts 
to be used to light a small 
lamp or to charge the HT 
battery- 

Tune-up of this little gem 
is pot pie, Just mount it in 
the air on whatever struc- 
ture vou plan to use. Point 
the nose of the wind vane 
north and by using the set 
screw in the disc interrupter 
collar, clamp the tab so it 
is centered through the 
H21 A1 that you have desig- 
nated north. Be sure the 
vane still rotates freely. Se- 
cure the weather cover in 
place; then go down to the 
shack, turn the power sup- 
ply on r and watch the LEDs 
blink. It is that simple. Of 
course, you knew it was go- 
ing to work before you put 
it in the air. Hi, hi! 

A word about finding 
parts and materials If you 
can't get the H21A1s local- 
ly, see Reference 1 I found a 
shop in my area where I can 
buy a foot of this and an 
inch of that, plus getting 
some good advice to boot. I 
found this shop by talking 
to a fellow who is building 
an experimental aircraft 
They use the same types of 
material. Perhaps you can 
find an experimental air- 
craft club in your area, or 
you can get your material 
where I got mine. See Refer- 
ence 2. 

I would be very remiss if I 
did not implicate my 
collaborators in this proj- 
ect: Fred Jones K3CVM, 

73 Magazine • January, 1983 65 



fau 



u. 



"I 

J 1 



FAST: 
SCAN 






$399 



Have you tried it yet? 
ATV TRANSMITTER/CONVERTER 




TC— 1 



*10 Watts Output 

* Standard frequencies Available 
'Broadcast Standard Sound 
"High-resolution & color video 

* Regulated AC Supply Built In 
'Tuneable Downconverter & Preamp 



Connect to the antenna terminals of any TV set. add a good 
450 MHz antenna, a camera and there you are. . .Show the 
shack, home movies, computer games, video tapes, etc 

ATV DOWNCONVERTER 




For those who want to see the ATV aciion 
before ihey commit to a complete station, 
the TVC-4 is *Of you. Great lot public mi- 
wee setups, demos, ami get ling a buddy 
t mere sled Just add an antenna and a TV 
set tuned to CH 2. 3. or 4 and plug in to 1 17 

volts ax. $89.00 TVC-4 

TVC-4L extra low-noise version. , $105 delivered in USA 

HOMEBREWERS; ASK FOR OUR BASIC FOUR-MODULE PACKAGE 

CALL Ofl WRITE FOR QUA COMPLETE LIST OF SPECIFICATIONS, station set- 
up diagrams, arid optional accessories which Include antennas, modulators, 
detectors, test generators, cameras, etc WE ARE A FULL-LINE SUPPLIER OF 
ALL YOUR ATV NEEDS 

TERMS: VISA or MASTER CARD by telephone or mall, of check or money order by 
mail All prices are delivered in USA AJlow imee weeks after order tor delivery 




Photo G. The readout panel with the eight-point compass 
rose on the left and the meter that will indicate wind veloc- 
ity on the right 






r\ /■* i^l l"/%Tn/\»\IIAf^ (213)447-4565 

P.C. ELECTRONICS 2522 Paxson Lim, 
Tom w&o&g Maryann wmyss Arcadia, California 91 006 



Don Zarfos K30AP, Tim 

Burke WA3KYD, Jim Ens- 
man WR3ERZ, Russ Hut, 
and Jim Williams. Thanks, 
fellows ■ 

References 

1 P Rosen Electronics, Inc. 
215 S, George St. 
York PA 17403 
(71 7^843-7881 



2. The Dillsburg Aeroplane Works 
RD#3 

Dillsburg PA 17019 
(717)-432-4589 

3. Optoelectronics 
General Electric Co. 

4. Transient Voltage Suppres- 
sion Manuat 

Second Edition 
General Electric Co. 






QUALITY SPECIALS 



SOPHISTICATED I.C.S 



DAT* SHEETS AND APPfl 0«<AT| APPLICATION NOTES A*f ndvitXJI HIII 
WW ALL FHTEGflATED CIRCUITS USTtO BEIOW 



"tJOHH DHQE, pitflHEH < C HAb THUTh-T^ft-FSELiCtrtLi 

QM* S*S 1 ssPlt to riFir« nivtfx t>* in mo ih» » 

wooowmiri 



ntiCiwtJ 
I *H) 



uanat dc tdsmm: < ■ ■■ inichwmhi 

1 1 QQMP EYa 1 DLCAPt I *TCtl am' Ml II 'in. lkcd HCO mm<\JT3 AHO 
rilpiT STPIOOM PiQCRM TO L10 LATCHES »L J _DWS 
ATTAIjHMFNT 0* PWMC*t#« FEW COUNT IN3 *a BCCWWJ 1 






iWBF- 



ftosffi 



■>dP»»CH#rtUTO*»TIVr.M*H»«(f MtT>-tW*FT dfarTAL 
lock r*H3L^«Mi0«i-ChniTCO*i*iffctT(e*»iviTM 
33 W13HIJ *u^ rr inosv n* v« «ode for <a^jt suipiriwa 

J* POTT VG4IAI HUttMNFIffliC «rtl>t LCD Ofln* 
ON !?* atiA ** Nl""!*! * COMPUTED**! 
GACUT CAM H HUM *» "■ f ■ 



T f-Fr:" 







i ish 



It*! 



mi 



CAPACITORS 



DW0£D TftMTp-LLfWI 

-- ■ ■ * K ttlt 



H WiBlt> ¥ 



m 
■v 
I Ml 
Fjg 

i b<. 
mi 
. n 



AXIAL ELELTTR>Dl¥T K9 

1 -i|.s.*yu 

i vmitwir 

J| fmlif'l^V 

mli- 

irli|7hV 

riMU.UlV 
m«.'H|1l 
mfcl.'Wi-v 
******* 



1 It 

re 

IT 
iT 
37 
H 

FIT 

ri 

■ 



Mr 
i? 
4 
14 
1* 
i* 

H 
.« 



COMFliTia &MA0f 



I* 30D 



H 



1* 

I* 
■ Ik 

i ■» 



radial Ei-ecmoirrwi 



:»*iihv 

33 ircld.Mv 
iT infamy 

J.KI niU'35V 

*ro miH-'jj* 

3S3 TlfD ?3¥ 

mi' Ultras* 
■>ih: lOu 



ITB 
IS 
IS 
1f 
14 
N 
II 
» 

ra 



ir 

■ 

> 

i! 

m 



fWlSCELLANEOUS 



HT LHHVUlC 
FIT LOTiP"QHLIHC 

:^CTtH 



fnnMrrm 

rr»PLlTH»! 




i m 

t a 

» n 

i «t 

■ n 

■ m 



GOLDSMITH 



SCIENTIFIC 



195 



CORPORATION 

P.O. BOX 319. COMMACK. NY 11725 
PHDNE ORDERS WELCOME^f&W} 9T9-T94* 

mtHtmum OHM ft i raw— ui FUNDS OMLt 

HEW rO*Jf STATE AftlDCNTS MOO S*ir5 TAT 

POSTAGE- ADD S% PLUS |> M fHaUflANCE. COO J2 £W Ef TWA 

AVA i j AB^LJ f v Qt Ct t* 1* tH l Tf; **S MA" Sc LMirtQ 



66 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



V-J 



POWER UP* 



2 METER 90 WATT OUTPUT 

AMPLIFIER WITH 18 DB GAIN PREAMP 




Model 90PL 
FOR ONLY 

FACTORY DIRECT 



$ 



1 39.95 

PLUS SHIPPING 



inn 


POW£ft M£A£UR£MENT 

at n av dc 


90 






















V) 
















y 


,*■ 


^* 


% 70 














* 


i 






Z 
g 60 












■ 
■ 


















< 
f 


' 










S^o 








■ 


* 












UJ 

5 SO 








• 
* 














o 
s: 20 






4 

* 
















to 




i 
* 


■» 




















H 



















• f RtdUEiCY rartgt 144 1*8 MH* 

• 0PERATI0M FK 01 SSB icDm{ileiel T bnwt Qs» AB1 

• HF ORiVl 1 id 30 wHU 

• HE VUG RF ict-.tmed mHi Ingh quatitr retsyt 

• SSB spefation bmll m dilit 

a POWER REflUlREMifTS ryptul 10 watts drtvt. 13 vnfM IT 13 8 V0C 

• IDLE currenl 20 mills 

• MOBILE or FIXED optrtbOfi 

• PREAMP 1 BQfi giin mffiimirn 

• MOlSt FIGURE ktt Th»n 1 b DB 

• PRE AMP KEYING mdependeni — separately RF aclivaied mlayi 
9 CONSTRUCTION wrap around aluminum heat smk 2 placet 

360 degrees tooling 

• SIZE 7"(w| x 6"(dl « 3"fhJ — WEIGHT 3 lbs 9 OH 

• IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT 



123456789 10 

POWER INPUT IN WAITS 

POWER CHART 



SPECIAL OFFER 
Matching Power Supply 

IS AMP SUPPLY *t U lbs im B"M I 5"(h| i B'HI 

IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT 

ALL PAHTS A*0 LABOR WARRANTED ONE FULL YEAR 



VJ90PL Ai^irier t139 95 alw t3 00 
VJ1S POWER Sotfr *t3 95 phn 17 DO 
*Pri**t USA only 



•99.95* 

PLUS SHIPPING 



VISA, MASTER CHARGE. M.O. or C.O.D. • PHONE (713) 477-0134 

V-J PRODUCTS, INC. 505 East Shaw, Pasadena, Texas 77506 

SERVING THE ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY SINCE 1S65 



Introducing Corsair 




A New No-Compromise 

HF Transceiver 



The CORSAIR is an extraordinary new HF trans- 
ceiver. Every function operates without compromise. 
New unique features make it a delight to operate, 

A new front end provides extreme sensitivity, low internal 
noise and high dynamic range to bring weak signals to 
life. For even greater overload prevention, the integral rf 
preamplifier can be switched out More effective than the 
usual rf attenuator. 

The filtering system, a TEN-TEC exclusive, virtually 
switches to privacy. It starts with a superb 2.4 kHz 12- 
pole ladder sideband filter system, standard It provides 
variable bandwidth for ssb, great for today's crowded 
phone bands. A novel pass band tuning circuit allows a re- 
ceived signal to be moved within the pass band to its opti- 
mum position with respect to QRM. Optional narrow band 
filters are available for ssb, cw and RTTY all switched from 
the front panel. The ultimate in QRM reduction. 

Full cw break-in opens a window on the band while 
transmitting, turning monologues into conversation. Or, if 
conditions dictate, just switch to semt-break-in. And no 
VOX adjustment when changing modes. 

A versatile offset tuning system allows the receiver and 
transmitter to be tuned separately with a ± 1 kHz range 
for fine tuning or ± 4 kHz for working off frequency. For 
net operation, both can be moved simultaneously. 

Reliability is designed in, The CORSAIR system is so 
rugged it will operate into infinite SWR. And we guaran- 
tee it unconditionally (except for lightning) for one year 
The CORSAIR is designed for 100% duty cycle, ideal for 
RTTY, SSTV and of course, contests. 



Beauty is more than skin deep. The contemporary styl- 
ing with the blackout LED frequency display (last digit in 
green), the baked-on textured bronze/black finish with 
aluminum trim will retain its handsome appearance per- 
manently. Beneath its sleek exterior is a carefully crafted 
chassis packed with performance. 

There are many other features, each with superb per- 
formance. An effective speech processor, notch filter, ad- 
justable noise blanker, signal spotter, three position AGC, 
threshold ALC simplified WX, all controlled from the 
front panel In addition, the CORSAIR has a compression 
loaded speaker, less than 2% audio distortion, and full ac- 
cessory connections including remote bandswitch output. 
It even has a volume equalizing headphone output. 

The CORSAIR is a total system of pure operating plea- 
sure—it really must be put through its paces to be fully ap- 
preciated. Its smooth controls, comfortable and logically 
spaced, give it the feel of a superlative transceiver One 
that will be a faithful companion for the years ahead- 
All TEN- TEC products are completely manufactured in 
the U.S.A., in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains. 

Model 560, CORSAIR transceiver $1169. 

See your TEN-TEC dealer or write for full information, 



TRIG 



i Ml*, 
•VILLE, TEWHESSE ■ UM1 



**See Ust of Advertisers on page 1 74 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 67 



International Success Story: 

The BBC 

From its battery of transmitters, the BBC fires a daily salvo of 

news and entertainment around the world. 

No commercials, either. 



Roger N. Peterson 
25 Orchard Lane 
New Canaan CT 06840 



Ask just about any short- 
wave radio listener or 
look at the most recent lis- 



tener-preference studies on 
international broadcasters, 
and you'll get the same art- 




Bush House, home of the BBC's External Services, in The Strand London. (All photos 
BBC copyright) 

68 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



swer The British Broadcast- 
ing Corporation (BBC) ranks 
number one. 

There are a number of 
reasons for this popularity 
ranking, and I was turning 
them over in my mind as I 
walked down The Strand in 
London on a sunny day on 
my way to the BBC head- 
quarters in Bush House, 
near Fleet Street Some cyn- 
ics say that the only reason 
for BBC popularity is that it 
is on the air more often and 
on more places on the dial 
than any other internation- 
al broadcaster. 

There is some truth to 
this, although the facts are 
not quite as above. The 
BBC ranks only fifth among 
international broadcasters 
for the amount of time on 
the air, per week. The USSR 
is first, followed by the US 
(Voice of America plus Ra- 
dio Free Europe), the Re- 
public of China (Radio Pe- 
king), and West Germany 
(Deutsche Welle). However, 
from the standpoint of pro- 



grams in English that can be 
heard here in North Ameri- 
ca, the BBC does indeed 
lead all the others You can 
hear the BBC round-the- 
clock in the US and Canada, 
and this beats such big 
North American broadcast- 
ers as the Voice of America, 
AFRTS (US Armed Forces 
Radio), and the popular 
CBC Northern Service in 
Canada, 

It also is true that BBC 
programs are often "all 
over the dial" on your re- 
ceiver. During many hours 
of the day, you can pick up 
their broadcasts on three, 
four, or even more different 
frequencies This is because 
of its unusually strong 
transmission facilities— 79 
transmitters, 47 of them in 
four different locations in 
Britain and 32 in eight over- 
seas relay stations, includ- 
ing the US, Canada, and the 
Caribbean, At certain 
hours, the Russians offer 
even more frequencies to 
the US listener, but only the 
BBC provides this multi- 
band reception for most of 
the twenty-four hours, 

While these technical ad- 
vantages give the BBC a big 
boost over competition, 
they are not the only rea- 
sons for its popularity 
among listeners. The great 
reputation for world news 
coverage makes the BBC 
unique among international 




The control room at Bush House, London, home of the BBC External Services, World Ser- 
vice programs are broadcast 24 hours a day from these facilities in English and 38 other lan- 
guages. 



broadcasters The BBC 
broadcasts more than 250 
news programs a day from 
its headquarters in London. 
They are all prepared in an 
ultra-modern newsroom 
with electronic readout 
aids of all kinds, and with a 
staff that numbers over 1 00, 
It may be the world's larg- 
est newsroom and, at this 
writing, certainly the most 
modern as it was complet- 
ed just over a year ago 
News is fed into this giant 



news machine by BBC cor* 
respondents from all over 
the world and by the inter- 
national news agencies. An- 
other important source is 
the famous BBC Monitoring 
Service. This BBC Division, 
located at Caversham Park, 
some 50 miles from Lon- 
don, provides round-the- 



clock reports on the con- 
tents of selected broad- 
casts from foreign radio sta- 
tions. This supplements the 
agencies' and foreign corre- 
spondents" reports. 

The BBC Monitoring Ser- 
vice provides a Summary of 
World Broadcasts every day 
and, in addition to sending 



A GUIDE TO BBC WORLD NEWS BROADCASTS 



Time (GMT) 

0000, 0200, 
and 0300 

0400, 0500, 
and 0600 

0700 

0800 and 0900 

1100 and 1300 

1600 and 1700 

1800 

2000 

2300 



Best Frequencies (MHz) 

5.975. 6.12, &175. 7.325, 11.750, 15.260 

5.975,6.175,9.510, 15.070 
6.175, 9.51 T 15.070 
9.510, 15.070 

6.195.9.510. 11775, 15.070 
15.070, 15.260, 17.830, 21.710 
15.070, 21J1 
6.175, 15.070 
5.975.6.175.7,325, 15.070 



AND THE FALKLAND ISLANDS CRISIS 

BBC is at Its best reporting on significant news events, and 
the Falkland Islands crisis certainly was a good example- 
First of all, the regular news broadcasts generally were an 
hour or so ahead of the wire services or what your local radio 
or TV station reported. You heard ft first on BBC if you tuned it 
in. Second, BBC has special programs to deal with current 
newsworthy events, and the Falkland situation was no excep* 
tion. On May 2, right after the air attack on the Argentine-hetd 
airfields on the islands, the BBC preempted one of Its most 
popular programs, Letter From America, for an interview with 
several military experts. 

These special programs generally come right after major 
news programs such as their 1 100, 2000 T 0000, and 0200 GMT 
broadcasts, but they can come at any time, as the BBC thinks 
nothing of interrupting regular programs for something spe- 
cial. 

Finally, the BBC has always had a special weekly broad- 
cast to the Falklands on Sunday afternoon from 2209 to 2245 
GMT on 9.915 and 12.040 MHz. I heard the one right after the 
Argentine invasion on April 4, and it was excellent. It included 
a message from the British Foreign Secretary, a review of Brit- 
ish press opinions, and even special messages to relatives* 
The program was very easy to receive in the Northeast, where 
I reside. Check it out at the above times and frequencies. 



73 Magazine • January. 1983 69 




A view of the antenna farm for the BBCs broadcasts to 
North America. The signal is loud and strong to the US 



it to the BBC News Staff, 
supplies it on a subscription 
basis to other governments, 
news agencies and news- 
papers, universities, re- 
search institutes, industrial 
and commercial organiza- 
tions, and private individu- 
als, 

World news can be heard 
in North America seventeen 
times a day (see box), In ad- 
dition, back-up programs 
on the world events are of- 
fered daily. Some of the 



most popular of these (as of 
last year) are: 

• Outlook — an up-to-the- 
minute look at people, 
events, and opinions to- 
gether with the latest UK 
news r sports, and weather 

• Twenty-Four Hours — 
analysis of the main news 
of the day plus reviews of 
the British press. 

• The World Today— ex- 
amines thoroughly one top- 
ical aspect of the interna- 
tional scene. 



SOME POPULAR BBC PROGRAMS 


Letter From America 
(Alistair Cooke) 


(AH Times GMT) 

Sundays 0545, 1115, 1645, 2315 


Letterbox 


Fridays 1415; Saturdays 2315; 
Sundays 0515, 2015 


Look Ahead 
(Program Previews) 


Daily 0940; weekdays 1943 


In The Meantime 


Thursdays 2120; Fridays 0150, 1115 


Outlook 


Weekdays 1900, 1515, 0115 {Tuesday* 
Saturday) 


Anything Goes 


Saturdays 1215; Mondays 0330, 0830 


Concert Hall 


Sundays 1515 


Top Twenty 
(Hit Records) 


Wednesdays 1830 t 2330; Thursdays 
1215 


New Ideas 


Saturdays 0530, 1015 T 2230; 
Wednesdays 1725 


Good Books 


Saturdays 2015; Sundays 0215 


Jazz For The Asking 


Wednesdays 2130 



• Commentary — back- 
ground to the news from a 
wide range of specialists, 

• Radio Newsreel — news 
of events as they happen, 
and dispatches from BBC 
correspondents all over the 
world, 

• New About Britain. 

• British Press Review — 
Survey of editorial opinion 
in the press. 

• Financial News — includ- 
ing news of commodity 
prices and significant 
moves in currency and 
stock markets. 

In addition to these daily 
reports, the BBC also offers 
a number of weekly review- 
type programs on current 
events and special interest 
subjects. Among the most 
popular: 

• Financial Review — a 
look back at the financial 
week. 

• Business Matters— a 
weekly survey of commer- 
cial and financial news. 

• From Our Own Corre- 
spondent — BBC reporters 
comment on the back- 
ground to the news. 

• From the Weeklies — a 
review of the British weekly 
press. 

• Listening Post — a week- 
ly survey of comment from 
radio stations around the 
world. 

While the BBC has no ri- 
val for its extensive cover- 
age of news, it also leads 
the way in many other types 
of programs— sport r drama, 
light entertainment, and 
music. These can be divid- 
ed into two categories — 
monthly features and regu- 
lar programs 

A typical month will 
have anywhere from 12 to 
16 feature programs These 
range from general interest 
to special interest subjects. 
Some are only for the "in- 
tellectuals/' and others are 
for the "common man/' In 
June, for example, the 
Queen's Birthday Parade 
(better known as "Trooping 
the Colours") is broadcast 
from London with all the 
music and pageantry you 



would expect. The BBC also 
has had weekly programs 
called " The Poetry of Eu- 
rope/' "The Movie Moguls/' 
and "Medical Hypnosis.'' 

Music is an important 
part of BBC programming 
In fact no other interna- 
tional broadcaster comes 
close to providing the num- 
ber of musical programs — 
both classical and "Pops" 
— as does the BBC Every 
month there are eight or 
nine special programs mak- 
ing their bows. Regular mu- 
sic programs include "Con- 
cert Hall/' "Talking about 
Music/' and a long-time 
BBC favorite, "The Plea- 
sure's Yours/' where Cor- 
don Clyde plays classical 
requests. Another "Classi- 
cal Record Review/' reports 
on new releases. 

Classical music is not the 
only thing that the BBC pro- 
vides listeners who dig in- 
struments and vocal 
sounds. For the rock devo- 
tee, there is the weekly 
"John Peel" show where the 
host selects tracks from a 
newly released album and 
singles from the progressive 
rock scene in London. "Jazz 
for the Asking" is a popular 
weekly request show, and 
'Top Twenty" lets you lis- 
ten to all the big hits. "Terry 
Wogan's Album Time" is a 
weekly show for those peo- 
ple who like the easy-listen- 
ing kind of music, and there 
are many more of the same 
on the BBC every week. 

Another area where BBC 
programming leads the way 
is in drama. There are four 
regular weekly features 
plus specials for the partic- 
ular month. Total air time 
per week for this type of 
show is about 16 hours. A 
regular drama program is 
"Thirty Minute Theater." 
This often shows plays by 
such famous writers as Dor- 
othy L Sayers, Terrence 
Rattigan, and Oscar Wilde. 

"Play of the Week/' "Ra- 
dio Theater," and "Short 
Story'' are other regular dra- 
ma programs 



70 73 Magazine • January, 1983 





Margaret Howard hosts the very popular "Letterbox" pro- 
gram on the BBC Hear it on Fridays at 1415, Saturdays at 
2375, or Sundays at 051 5 and 2015 CM 7. 



Alistair Cooke is heard every Sunday on the BBC with his 

popular "Letter From America" program. Listen to it at 0545, 
1115, T645, or2315CML 



Book lovers hear the fol- 
lowing programs every 
week: "Book Choice/' 
"Good Books/' and "Paper- 
back Choice/' For those in- 
terested in science and hob- 
bies, "Discovery" covers 
advanced developments in 
science, "New Ideas" gives 
you news of the latest Brit- 
ish products and inventions 
of particular interest to the 
home owner and small busi- 
nessman, "Science in Ac- 
tion" lives up to its name, 
and "Time Off*' is a pro- 
gram devoted to hobbies, 
pastimes, and entertain- 
ment. 

Religion is not over- 
looked at the BBC, either. 
Services broadcast from fa- 
mous English cathedrals 
and churches can be heard 
on Sundays and Mondays. 
Two other programs are 
"Report on Religion/' a 
weekly magazine of reli- 
gious news and views, and a 



daily program called "Re- 
flections." 

Sports occupy a promi- 
nent part of the BBC weekly 
schedule, but a good many 
of these broadcasts are 
"very British indeed" — rug- 
by, cricket, British football 
— and do not have a great 
appeal to the average US 
audience. If you have any 
British expatriates in your 
area, you can get them real- 
ly excited by inviting them 
over to hear something like 
England versus Scotland in 
football. 

BBC programs are very 
carefully researched by sur- 
veys and opinion polls. A 
Listener Panel (of which I 
am a member) is made up 
of 88% foreign nationals 
and 12% British expatriates 
and is asked to vote on indi- 
vidual programs and/or sub- 
jects on a regular basis. 
Panel voting accounts for 



the unusual number of dra- 
ma programs and for the 
addition of a new business 
news program ("Financial 
Review/' mentioned above). 
Over 50% of the panel ap- 
parently wanted more 
business news. 

Research indicates that 
one of the most popular 
BBC weekly programs is Al- 
istair Cooke's "Letter from 
America/' Back in 1946 P the 
BBC commissioned Cooke 
to deliver a series of radio 
talks on the subject of the 
USA where he had been liv- 
ing and working for more 
than a decade. The original 
plan called for thirteen 
weekly programs, but it has 
never stopped in all these 
years. It may well be the 
longest-running series in ra- 
dio history Listen to it on 
Sundays at 0545, 1115, 
1645, or 231 5 GMT. 

One other BBC program 
that continues to score high 



marks is "Letterbox." This is 
a show where several peo- 
ple simply read letters (of- 
ten complaints or sugges- 
tions for BBC programming) 
from listeners, and the BBC 
replies On the surface, it 
doesn't sound very fantas- 
tic. However, the people on 
the show are so funny — 
with British wit and satire 
— that it has become one of 
the big BBC hits Hear it on 
Fridays at 141 5, Saturdays 
at 2315, and Sundays at 
1 51 5 and 201 5 GMT 

At this point you might 
well be thinking about why 
the British go to all the trou- 
ble and expense of provid- 
ing such a wealth of pro- 
grams to the shortwave ra- 
dio listeners of the world 
To understand their mo- 
tives we should examine 
the basics of the whole BBC 
foundation. 

The letters "BBC" were 
first used in 1922 when the 

73 Magazine • January, 1983 71 



Introducing The SRT-3000 
RTTY Communications 
Send-Receive Terminal 



SRT-3000 

List 
$995.00 

Introductory 
Price 

$795.00' 



* Built-in demodulator & AFSK modulator for 170,425350 Hz Shifts, 
high and low tone pairs * 60,66/75.100,132 WPM Baudot, 110,300 Baud 
ASCII, 5-99 WPM Morse • 1000 character text buffer with BREAK 
feature * Ten 60 character message memories with battery backup * 
Selectable display formats, 24 lines x 72 characters (2 pages), 24 lines 
x 36 characters (4 pages}. 16 lines x 36 characters (6 pages) * Split 
screen operation * On screen status Hne displays a tuning bar, mode, 
speed, shift, tone pair, normal /rave rse t USOS. WRU t SELCAL, buffer 
mode and buffer count • Cassette interface for long "Brag Tapes" or 
unattended message storage • Baudot and ASCII printer outputs * 
Built-in audio monitor * Built-in 110 VAC power supply • Other 
features— PTT control, WRU. SELCAL, sync idle, CW ID. USOS, auto- 
start, full or hall duplex, scope outputs, weight control, intercharacter 
spacing, reverse video, RS-23Z. word wrap around ■ Compact size only 
13.3 x X0.3 x 4 inches • Made in USA, 



'Introductory prices good thru Feb. 28 , 1 983. 
Options i 9* video monitor shown 1149*00. 



Send For 
Free Information 



PCM/ EL EC TRONIC S f INC 

787 Briar Lane, Beloit, Wis. 53511 

(608)362-0410 



British Broadcasting Com- 
pany was formed and when 
regular daily broadcasts be- 
gan. In those days, the BBC 
was a commercial organiza- 
tion, but one that operated 
under a license on condi- 
tions which would have pre- 
vented it— even if it wanted 
to— from turning broad- 
casting into a moneymaker 
for the shareholders From 
the start, it placed the inter- 
ests of the public above all. 
The result was that the Brit- 
ish developed a genuine 
public service broadcasting 
system, paid for by its audi- 
ence through their receiv- 
ing licenses. In 1927, the 
Company became the Brit- 
ish Broadcasting Corpora- 
tion. It is a public corpora- 
tion constituted by Royal 
Charter and holding a li- 
cense from the Minister re- 
sponsible for broadcasting. 
Thus the BBC is neither a 
government department 
nor a commercial concern 
The External Services, 



which is what we hear on 
our shortwave receivers, 
are an integral part of the 
BBC, operating under the 
same charter as the domes- 
tic service and sharing the 
same traditions. Unlike the 
domestic service (which is 
financed by annual "listen- 
er licenses'! the External 
Service is paid for by Parlia- 
mentary grants-in-aid. The 
government prescribes the 
languages which are broad- 
cast and the length of time 
each is on the air r but edito- 
rial control rests with the 
BBC, 

External broadcasting 
from Great Britain began in 
1932 with a service in En- 
glish. A few years later, the 
BBC was asked by the gov- 
ernment to broadcast in 
other languages, the first of 
which was Arabic, During 
the early days of World 
War 11, the BBC was a con- 
stant ray of hope for the 
people in France and other 
Nazi-occupied countries I 



can well remember, as an 
airman shot down in France 
a few weeks before the in- 
vasion and hiding in a 
French farmhouse, listening 
to the BBC on the family ra- 
dio. The BBC used to send 
coded messages to the 
French underground during 
those days. 

Today, the External Ser- 
vices broadcast to the 
world in English and 38 
other languages for over 
100 hours every day. These 
programs originate mainly 
from the 52 studios in Bush 
House in London. 

While the British Empire 
is no longer the world 
power that it once was and 
no longer has all those colo- 
nies on which "the sun nev- 
er sets/' it still has thou- 
sands of citizens and expa- 
triates living abroad. The 
BBC brings information and 
entertainment from home 
and helps them keep their 
ties to the mother country, 
This, of course, is a prime 
objective of BBC broad- 
casting overseas. 

Naturally, the BBC is in- 
terested also in presenting 
its own point of view to citi- 
zens of other countries 
around the world, The BBC 
estimates that about 75 mil- 
lion adults listen regularly 
(once a week or more) to its 
External Services. The En 
glish broadcasts are heard 
by about 25 million. 

Like all international 
shortwave broadcasters, 
BBC programs and frequen- 



cies change from month to 

month. How can you keep 
up-to-date with these con- 
stant changes? Basically 
there are two ways to do it 
— by your radio receiver 
and by print. The BBC has 
three programs which will 
help you keep abreast of 
things. First is a show called 
"Look Ahead" which pre- 
views programs for each 
day. "In the Meantime" is a 
program which tells you 
what is new in BBC pro- 
grams. And third, there is a 
program called "Wave- 
guide" which covers fre- 
quency changes, propaga- 
tion estimates, and other 
things which help you to 
keep tuned well to the BBC. 
Serious listeners to the 
BBC will be interested in re- 
ceiving a monthly copy of 
"London Calling." This pub- 
lication is sent airmail from 
London every month, pre- 
viewing programs and giv- 
ing frequency changes so 
that the listener is right on 
top of BBC broadcasts a 
month ahead of time. Un- 
fortunately, this is not a 
free publication and the 
cost to subscribers in the 
US is $13.00 per year, You 
can get a free sample copy, 
however, by writing BBC 
World Service, PO Box 76, 
Bush House, London WC2B 
4PH. Or, to save yourself 
the cost of an overseas air- 
mail stamp, direct your or- 
der to: British Broadcasting 
Corporation, 630 Fifth Ave- 
nue, New York NY10019.B 



BEST BBC FREQUENCIES FOR NORTH AMERICA 


Time (GMT) 


Frequencies (MHz) 


0000-0230 


15.07, 15,26, 11.75, 7,325, 6.175. 6.12, 5.975 


0230-0330 


11.75, 9.60, 9.51, 7,325, 6.175, 6.12, 5.975 


0330-0630 


9.51,6.175,5.975. 15.07 


063CK»730 


15.07 T 9,51 


0915-1100 


11750, 9740,15.07 


1100-1330 


21.55, 15.07 t 1175, 9.51, 6.195 


1300-1500 


2171, 15.07 


1500-1745 


2171/17,83,15.40,15.26,15,07 


1745-2000 


15.07,9.41, 12.095 


2000-2100 


21.56, 15.26 T 15.07,6.175 


2100-0000 


15.26, 15.07,6.175 


2200-0000 


15.42. 1175, 9.59, 9.51, 6.12, 15.07 


23OCH3OO0 


7.325, 5.975 


This chart effective summer, 1982. Some changes will take 


place in the fall. 



72 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



Reader Sewce for facing page **5 — 






SHOWN ACTUAL SIZE 



FEATURES SO 
UNIQUE AND 
OF SUCH 
SUPERIOR 
COMMERCIAL- 
GRADE 

QUAUTY, I 

THAT... I 



;*m fv 



PCS*4QOO 



■ 



PWR/VOL 






SQL 



fCC J r ' # 



M MODE 

3 A-« 



Am9 



Mm/ 



lOQK STE^ 



OO R€V MHl 



□ OS ft 



3 A 



STEP SCAN TONE 



OFF 



AN 



1 




a 


I 


■ 

D 


M WH 

a 



IT CARRIES A 



1 



YEAR L M TED WARRANTY! 



• 8 MHZ COVERAGE, CAP/MARS BUILT IN: 142.000-149.995 
MHz in selectable steps of 5 or 10 kHz COMPARE ! 

• TINY SIZE; Only 2" H x 5.5" W x 6.8" D! COMPARE! 

• MICROCOMPUTER CONTROL: At the forefront of technology! 

• UP TO 8 NON-STANDARD SPLITS: Ultimate versatility for 
CAP/MARS. COMPARE! 

• 10-CHANNEL MEMORY IN TWO 8-CH ANNEL BANKS: Retains 
frequency and standard offset. 

• DUAL MEMORY SCAN: Scan memory banks either separately 
or together COMPARE! 

• TWO RANGES OF PROGRAMMABLE BAND SCANNING: 
Limits are quickly reset Scan the two segments either separately 
or together COMPARE! 

• FREE AND VACANT SCAN MODES: Free scanning stops 5 
seconds on a busy channel \focant scanning stops on unoccupied 
frequencies 

• DISCRIMINATOR SCAN CENTERING (AZDEN EXCLUSIVE 
PATENT): Always stops on frequency. 

• TWO PRIORITY MEMORIES: Either may be instantly recalled at 
anytime COMPARE! 

f MEMORY BACKUP: Never lose the programmed channels* 
FREQUENCY REVERSE: The touch of a single button inverts 
the transmit and receive frequencies, no matter what the offset. 

• ILLUMINATED KEYBOARD WITH ACQUISITION TONE: 
Unparalleled ease of operation 

• BRIGHT GREEN LED FREQUENCY DISPLAY: Easily visible 



even in direct sunlight 

• DIGITAL S/RF METER: Shows incoming signal strength and 
relative output 

• BUSY-CHANNEL AND TRANSMIT INDICATORS: Bnghl LEDs 
show when a channel is busy and when you are transmitting 

■ FULL 16-KEY TOUCHTONE PAD: Keyboard functions as 
autopatch when transmitting 

• PL TONE: Optional PL tone unit allows access to PL repeaters 
Deviation and tone frequency are fully adjustable 

• TRUE FM: Not phase modulation. Unsurpassed intelligibility and 
fidelity 

• 25 WATTS OUTPUT: Also 5 watts low power for short-range 
communication and battery conservation, (Transmitter power 
is fully adjustable) 

• SUPERIOR RECEIVER: Sensitivity is 0.2 uV for 20-dB quieting. 
Audio circuits are designed to rigorous specifications for excep- 
tional performance, second to none COMPARE! 

• REMOTE-CONTROL MICROPHONE: Memory A-1 call up/ 
down manual scan and memory address functions may be 
performed without touching the front panel! COMPARE! 

• OTHER FEATURES: Dynamic microphone, built-in speaker 
mobile mounting bracket, remote speaker jack, and all cords, 
plugs, fuses and hardware are included. 

• ACCESSORIES: CS-6R 6-amp ac power supply. CS-AS remote 
speaker, and Commumcatfons Specialists SS-32 PL tone module 

• ONE-YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY! 



EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTOR 

AMATEUR-WHOLESALE ELECTRONICS TOLL FREE, ,.800-327-3102 

8817 SVY 129th Terrace, Miami. Florida 33176 Telephone (3051 233*3631 Telex 80-3356 



VISA 



Aflosfe* 



AAANUFACTORER 



JAPAN PIEZO CO. LTD. 

1-12-17 Kamirenjaku, Mitaka, Tokyo. 181 Japan. 



Telex 781*2822452 



I 



DUAL DRIVE TRIBANDERS 



* 20, 15 and 10 meters • Wideband. Low 3WR- No tuner needed 

* Exclusive phased dual drive gives higher gain • Exclusive coax* 
ial capacitors have lower losses, higher Q * Transmitter power is 
radiated not lost in the traps • Full power low loss balun. Gives 
improved beam pattern 

TET Antenna Systems presents three full size trap multiband beams to meet every 
amateur need 5 element, 4 element, and 3 element models all with the exclusive TET 
dual phased drive This famous drive system originated with HBSCVand was perfected 
by JA3MP When you buy TET dual drive you know you have trie best. It has more gain 
- just like adding another parasitic element. And wide bandwidth so you can use your 
solid-state transceiver on both phone and CW without a tuner. 

Only the highest quality materials are used throughout. All aluminum tubing is 6061 -T6 
alloy. Stainless steel fasteners are provided tor all electrical connections. Tubing Is cut 
and predrilled to precision tolerances for easy one afternoon assembly Light weight 
and tow wind area designs permit use of simpler support structures. 

All models feature full 3 Kw PEP power handling, VSWR typical 1 .5 or less across all of 
20, 1 5 and, on 1 meters, from 28 to 29.2 MHz Drive impedance is 50 ohms and 
maximum element length 27*. They accomodate masts from 1 % to 2 " diameter, with- 
stand winds to 100 rr\ph and are furnished complete with a low loss balun that easily 
withstands full rated power- For gain and front-to*back ratio specifications wrfte or call 
the factory. hA _ 

HB35T HB43SP HB33SP 

Boom Length: 24' f" 

Turn Radius T8' 10 1 ' 

Wind Area Ft 2 : 7.9 

Wind load tbs. @ 80 mph : 1 60 

Boom Die,: . . 2" 

Weight, lbs. - 50 

Price: $349.95 

+ shipping 



19" 8' 
16' 9" 
6.6 

132 

2" 

, 38 

5239,95 
+ Shipping 



13*2" 
15 

4.7 

102 

. . . 1-5/8 HI 

27 

$199.95 
+ shipping 



iB35T 



HB43SP 



Send for free catalog describing these dual 
drive beams, our VHF Swiss quads, roof- 
mount towers, elevation rotators and more. 

Don 'I wart any longer to start working rare 
DX. Order your dual-drive beam today! 

BY MAIL: 
TET Antenna Systems 
1924-E W, Mission Road 
E scon dido, CA 92025 



ANTENNA SYSTEMS by phone: 71 4-743-7025 



^ 170 



BEEPER III 






"THE PROFESSIONAL TOUCH 
COMES tO AMATEUR RADIO!" 



BP-3 & utomiuc&Uj prondw a gmtta tttfb Ir#- 
q uency beep at the beginning of each tnnimia 
Hon and a low tw«p ai ihe end Virtually aliml- 
naiSB ■■taJk-ov&r"' Operates Tor up bo one year 
on a stnglo B-V battery (not supplied j. Can ba 
directly interfaced Lo any transceiver which is 
keyed by grounding the PIT Ltn» nfte PTT line 
voltagB must be poaifcm. not gruur than £4 
VDC. nor the current greater than 100 ma j 
Works witn vrrtu*Uy *U cscdem fair You've 
heard it, now you ean haw Hi'* 



it 



ADD THE BEEP! 



»» 



'Bf><3A Onrnplete with oaetj. cable. 
Standard 4-pin connectors 
HP-3B As 4bcn?e except without 
aonnactcrs AAt&youruwn 
beard wsa 
■nyenilrm 
Alt unas 
add 6% Sales Tax 



■Fffifi 



S9 90 pp 
OH reeader.^ 



k*08 



3i4« Dor* Dm* • Oeyten. Otto iS4ii 




. _ _ ^ - mm ^ ^-*^n^_ Store Hours: MorvThurs 8-5 MST. 

ANTECK, INC. 

STAINLESS STEEL WHIP— FIBERGLASS LOADING COIL 

— PATENT APPLIED. NO COILS TO CHANGE 
— LESS THAW 15 VSWR (ENTIRE TUNING RANGE) 

TUNE 3.2 TO 30 MHz FROM THE OPERATORS POSITION 
— FAST AND SLOW SCAN RATES 

The Model MT 1RT mobile antenna tunes 3.2 to3Q MHz mctusive 750 walls CW, 15QC watts PEP lor hams .rnthtary 
MARS. CAP. and commercial service Center loaded for high efficiency Enables tuning to exact resonance to 
a anted frequency Allows tun output from solid state finals No worry about reduced output from shut down cir- 
cuits Output is unaffected by moisture and ine elements Tuned by a control bo* at the operator s position Mast 
section contains a double action hydraulic cylinder driven by two miniature hydraulic pumps and t2 volt DC 
motors for positive control No creeping during operation or mobile motion Can be remoted up to 500 fi from 
antenna. 

MT-1RT amateur nel S24Q.O0 9.00 UPS shipping m US 

MT. tRTR (retro Kit for all MT-rs)$i ifi.00 

MT-T amateur nel 129 95 

MT- 1 A (marine) stainless steel $179.95 






ig ml). 
7.00 UPS m U.S. 
700UP$mU-S, 
7 00 UPS m U.S. 




VISA-- 



^356 



Route 1, Box 415 
ANTECK, INC. Hansen, Idaho 83334 



masiw charge 



208-423-4100 



ALL YOUR GEAR AT YOUR 
FINGERTIPS IN A CONVE- 
NIENT CONSOLE DESK 

Requires only 60" corner space 
Formica desk top and shelves 
Shelf height adjustable 
Solid maple legs 
$495.00 check or M.O. 
Shipped freight collect 
Allow 30-45 days delivery 

Send for detailed brochure 



152 



CQ PRODUCTS 

8280 lanes Ave. 
Suite 137-1700 

Woodridge, IL 60517 







tChaif ana bqw fitment not included/ 
Weight of table ts 250 fbs. 



74 73 Magazine • January, 1983 




COMPRO- 
MISE 







Others claim more gain for 
their antennas than the 
IsoPole™ antennas, but none 
can beat the IsoPoJe for 
HONEST on-the-horizon 
omni-directional gain unless 
you are witling to spend at 
least THREE TIMES AS 
MUCH!!! The IsoPole is 
easiest of ALL competitive 
models to assemble, has a 
weather protected, factory- 
tuned matching network, (no 
more aggravating SWR varia- 
tions with weather changes), 
uses all stainless steel hard- 
ware, and is designed to 
withstand severe icing and 
wind conditions. The IsoPole 
antenna is UPS shippable 
without the standard 10 foot 
1 1 /4 inch TV mast. You can 
buy the mast from your local 
ham dealer, hardware store, 
or Radio Shack™ store for 
less than the shipping costs 
of a single mast When good 
strong, low cost 10 foot sec- 
tions of mast are so easily 
available, why compromise by 
using several shorter pieces 
that have to be joined 
together? 



PO 



L 







r more details, please write 
for our latest catalog or visit 
your favorite dealer. 




Prices and Specifications subject to 
change without notice or obligation. 



ADVANCED ELECTRONIC 

APPLICATIONS, INC. •* 

P.O. Box C-2160, 

Lynn wood, WA 98036 

(206) 775-7373 

Telex: 152571 AEA INTL 

^^BT ^L Brings you the 



Breakthrough! 




v.-.-: ii i ■■ iiMpi ill . t _J 
■X!)!!l L'.'.'J I ^ 



WHY SETTLE FOR HALF THE BAND? 
Enjoy super-gain, low VSWR, and FULL COVERAGE, 144 
through 148 MHz, with less weight and windload. Dual-driven 
elements, balanced feed for a better match and clean pattern. 



Bandwidth 



144-148 MHz 



Baiun: 



Gain; 



15.5 dBd 



Boom; 



2KW 4:1 
21' .5/1 Ye" 



VSWR: 



1,2:1 & less 



Beamwidth: 



2S a 



Windload: 1 .6 sq ft 
Weight: 9 lbs 



CIRCULAR POLARIZED For 
the Phase NIB satellite and 
terrestrial DX, ATV, and FM. 
Minimizes multipath and flut- 
ter fading. Rugged sym- 
metrical construction. 



Bandwidth: 



420*450 MHz 



Gain 



12dBdc 



VSWR: 



1.5:1 & less 



RB 



20 dB 




420-450-1 8C 



Baluns: 2KW, 4:1 (2 ) 



W indload: .5 sq \± 



Boom: 



BB'Vr' 



Weight: 3.6 lbs 




JKhcArl ■-"- ."-"--. ' r i-i- i ' i ' i *. : i : i 




IDEAL for point-to-point and 
repeater control. Rear- 
mounted, vertically polariz- 
ed, compact, Continuous 
coverage, 420-470 MHz. 
Direct coax feed suitable for 
most installations. 



420-470-6 



Bandwidth: 

Gain: 

VSWR: 



420-470 MHz 



BdBd 



1.2:1 &less 



Boom: 



27V OD. 



Beamwidth: 



60° 




Weight 



1.2 lbs 



20 dB f min 



SEE YOUR KLM DEALER: 

KLM Electronics, Inc. P.O. Box 816, Morgan Hill, CA 95037 
(408) 779-7363 



**$ee Lttt of Advertisers on page 1 1* 



73 Magazine * January, 1983 75 



Its Hard To Be Humble When You're 

Number One On 2 Meters! 

The best selling and per- 
forming 2 meter FM rig 
in the USA, gives you more 
for your money. 
25 watts, Touchtone® 
mike, 10 memories 
with built-in memory 
retention, scanning 
priority channel, sub-audible 
tone module built-in . . . 
and much, much more! 

Call or write for brochure. 




8 



ORDER NOW DIRECT 
CALL TOLL FREE 



It 




-251-4141 



This number for ORDERS ONLY! 

ORDER DIRECT or at your dealer! 
DISTRIBUTED BY: 



FM2030 



SIKPK 



INCLUDES Tone Pad Microphone and all accessories. 
Shipping: $5.00 Eastern ILS^A. $7.50 Western U.S.A. 



Central 81 South American orders: 
PHONE: (305) 592-7016 



$309 



Mail Order - COD - Bank Cards WC 



1/rkW niCTDiDi iTiivir r*fv ikia j0 , Company reserves the right to change specifications 

KUK Ulb I KIBU I INU CO., INC. ^ 81 arrf prira without notice. 

762 S. GALLATIN RD, (MADISON SQUARE SHOPPING CTRJ -MADISON, TN 37115 -PHONE (615) 865-7949 -TLX56 8652 






15 Meter Mobile CW & USB 

START YOUR DAY ON A GOOD KEY!!! 

WORK OTHER HAMS LIKE: XE2BGM, ZL1PQ, 
KL7JFV f EA7EU, NN3SI, DJSRR, DL0BBC T 
US6AK, JA3JMP, PY2-CPQ, F08GW, KM6FF, 
VK2BO OE8MOK 

OA4ARB ^^^^^^^^ G3BRW 

W1AW 




High 10W (PEP) low 2W (PEP): VFO tuning: noise blanker: 
fine-tuned SB, KHz±CW off-set: digital frequency 
counter; 13,8V dc # 3A, negative ground; L 9.5" xW 9" 
x H 2.5'*; weight (2,3 kg) 5.7 lbs.; mobile mounting bracket. 




JUST SUGHTt Y AHtAD 



SOON NEW 

10-160 METERS 



DLR INFO & ORDER, CALL 
1275 N. GROVE ST, 
ANAHEIM, CALIF, 92806 (714) 630-4541 

NOTE; Price, specifications subject to change without 

not ice ■ a n< J obi trja i ion ** 3 ' a 



WORK THE U.H.F. BANDS 

Add a tran&vcrtrr or converter 10 your existing 10m, 6m or 2m equipments. 
Choose from ihe larger selection of modules available for DX, OSCAR. 
EME, ATV. 

TRANS VERTERS MMT m ~ 144 W 95 

MMT 144-28 $199.<)5 
MMT 432-28 (S) $299.95 
MMT 439-ATV $349.95 
MMT 1296-144 $374.95 
OTHER MODELS AVAILABLE 
write for details 

POWER AMPLIFIERS 

all models include RF VOX & Low Noise RX Pre-AmpL 
(no pre-amp in MML432-100) 




2 Mtrtvrs: 



lOOtt iiiput 

100W output 

SOW uut[iiit 

30W otjtptii 

25VV ttitput 



MMU44-HXI-LS 

MML144-1QQ-S 
MMLl44^ri0- S 
MML144-30-LS 
MML144-25 



IWflr3WUi 
H>YV input 
J0VV input 
IW or 3H 
3W input 



1264*3$ 

1236 as 

I1L4.9S 



432 MHz: 



1UOW nitput 
50^ i»iit|Tirl 
WW output 



*44 

If ask 




MML43&100 l»W input 

MML43&5Q UJWinpji 

MML432..KKL IW or 3W In 
1 2HH- 1 2flfi Ml I/: Cuming soon. Watch for del ails 

ANTENNAS fine!. 50 ohm baling 

2 Meter J -Beams: 12.3 dBd gain 

8 urar 8 Horizon/1 pol DH-2M $63.40 

Hhv 8 Vertical po] D^2M~vert 76,95 

1250- 1300 MHz Lopp-YagI 129ft- LY $49.75 

Send 36* stamps for full details of ail our VHF/UHF items, 

Pre-selector fillers Transverters 

Low-pass filters Converters ^VlSA _ 

Varactor iriplers ^^ Antennas 

Preamplifiers V Crystal Filters 

Spectrum International, Inc. 
Post Office Box 1084s 
Concord. Mass. 01742 USA 

I 



D8/2M 





mtMtdwu 



436 



76 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



EMOTE 





MIKE 



WORKS ON ANY RADIO— MOBIL OR BASE 



FM Wireless Mike 



• Range— up to 300 ft. 

• FM Audio 

• XTAL Controlled 

• Simple Hook-up 

• Reliable years of service 

Stop; The steering wheel mike cord 
tangle. Stop: Running back and forth to 
answer a call on your radio. Stop: The 
inconvenience of being tied to your 
radio during long QSO's. The Remote-O 
Mike may be connected to any HF S VHP 
or UHF ham transceiver. Just connect 
the Remote-O-MIke receiver to the mike 
input jack and each time you press the 
PTT button on your cordless mike your 
ham rig will function as your normal 
mike- The Remote-OMike receiver will 
provide both the PTT and audio to your 
ham rig. 

Use in and around the house, auto. 
boat, etcetera Just tike a repeater with 
a range of up to 300 ft Each Remote- 
OMike includes a XTAL controlled wire- 
less FM mike and FM receiver How do 
you spell mike cord tangle relief (Remote- 
OMike) Order today for your mike cord 
reliel 




master charge 






VtSA 



^57 



To Order Call (714) 268-8131— Free Shipping 







Discount Ham Radio 9520 Chesapeake Dr., #606 A. San Diego, CA 92123 



GOTHAM 
ANTENNAS 

(305) 294-2033 

SMALL LOT TRAP OIPOLES 




MODEL BANDS LGTH 

TSL 8040 80 40 7a 

TSL 4020 40 S0 15 40 

SMALL LOT SHORTENED DAPPLES 



Si 8010 

Si 160 

SL-80 

SL40 



B0 40 JO 
15 10 
160 
B0 
40 15 



75 

130" 

63 

33 



FULL SIZE PARALLEL DlPQLES 



130 



PRICE 
(4995 
S4795 



1M95 

*38tt 
S3795 
S»95 

$4995 



HI 



FPO^eOlO 90 40 20 

15 10 
FPO.40K) 40.20.15.10 63' *44 95 

NE W PQH TABLE VERTI CAL? IDE AL FOR 
A PA RTMEN TS7 CAM Pi N G, TRAIL ED S 

folds, lo S" Package No Hadiais Requited 
Fully Assembled F^u Legal Umit n VSWR 

MODEL BANDS HGHT PRICE 

PV-aO^O B0 10 -3 $59 95 

PftQUEN DESIGN OOTKAM ALL BAND 
fTTCALS 

V 160 160 90 40 20 Z3 *** 95 

IS 10 6 
VflO BO40 30 Z3T $4295 

15 10 6 

V 40 40.20 15 tO E 22 W0 95 

FAMOUS GOTHAM QUADS 
2 Elements— 3 Bands CompFsie $149.95 
CHAMPIONSHIP GOTHAM BEAMS 
FuH Size Complete from $99.95 
DEALER tNQUtfVES WW TED 
CALL OR SEND LARGE SASE FOR CAT* 
LOG Shipping Oipoto* A Verticals 
12 50 USA *7 00C*n*d* 1S00FPO APO 
Beams i Quads Snipped UPS or Freight 
Collect Fla Add 5% Sates Tai 

1415 First St • Key West FL 33040 




The Complete (&3 

RTTY Communications 
Program for the 80s 

ONLY $5995 



POSTPAID 




For your 48K Apple I! with one disc drive 

Works with all tuning units. 

Verified File Transfer v assures error-free communication 



*TM 



Full Radio Bulletin Board System 1 

"Open" Program — easy for you to modify 



UNIVERSAL SOFTWARE SYSTEMS, INC. 

9 SHIELDS LANE ■ RDGEFIELD, CT 06877 

{203} 438-3117 




*^i89 



VISA/fvtC OK 



,*S#e Ltst of Advetttsets on page J N 



73 Magazine * January, 1963 77 



Active-Filter Design Made Easy 

Using this BASIC program, if you don't like the design, 
then scrap it Ail you lose is a few seconds. 



B, k Javlor WD4HPC 
922 Reaves Street 
fackson MS 192Q4 



There have been many 
articles on active band- 
pass filters in the electron- 
ics/amateur publications, 
Most of the articles art: 



recipes, Le,, if you want my 
performance, duplicate my 
circuit The rest have been 
tutorial articles which are 
mathematical in nature 12 
There is a section on mul- 
tiple-feedback bandpass 
(MFB) filter design in the 
1979 AKRL Handbook? and 
there are at leas! two hooks 



devoted to active filter 
design. 4S 

The equations used in de- 
signing the most common 
type of active bandpass fil- 
ter— the second-order, MFB 
filter — can be solved nearly 
as easily as the name of the 
filter can be pronounced. 
The problem is that all of 



the design parameters and 
the component values are 
interdependent. Changing 
any one can lead to changes 
in others, which leads to 
more calculations 

This is just the sort of cal- 
culation that is ideally suit- 
ed for computer evaluation. 
The program described in 



Program listing. 



BASl 

f*tn BY H !h> UD4HPC 

30 REM I Nfi ORDER MULTIPLE 



FEED' RAtfftFftSS FILTERS 



100 
ivy 

■ 

230 

140 

SO 



-o 

REii INI it HON Of T IONS FOLLOW 

PRINT'YOUR CHOi ARE A 1 . FOLLOW ■ 

i MOOSE PI « R3« R5 AND ■ " 
i H00S1 (3» Of I ANH C" 

i UOOSi: i. I ■ Pf P ANIi ti* 

•I Al I- l-h-Fn I V 

SCALE FPI imp 

,i i i-ii i DANCE 
[mi caJ l Ul Al EONS 



pftlN/l 

PR INT 
PRINT 
PI I NT 
PR IN I 
PRINT 
INPm 
IF 



' I 
■ ■ 

* I 

"4 

., 

■ 

■ 

I HEW K 



CH ANBTNO 

( MfiN«i-|N"i 



CA'pacitor$* 

RES 313 TORS' 



BY 
BY 

of rrwoNi NTS" 

FOP ■ ASCAUED SECTIONS' 



Ni 



il R R E SPnw D\W 5 r fl ¥ 00 R V Hfl ■ T C E " i H 



00 
3O0O 

00 

£000 

A FILTER br SPECIFYING ALL COMPONENTS 
-II r"R3*JR3« *RS' !R5f "C'lC 



At I PARAMETERS AND C 



310 IF M IHEH 

IF - MIEN 

IV IF ft 

340 IF M FHEN 

IF h^* rHEN 

M.0 IF H=7 1HEN 

GOTO 
9<J9 REM PI S MiN 
1000 INPUT 'RJ 
1010 C*C:*1I '■ 
102O 0»»1S*R5/RJ 

1030 G=SORt SRi*R5+R3*l%5>/(4*fti^3;i > 
1040 F-O/t *R1*C*|, 

1050 GOTO 4000 
1999 REM DESIGN A FILTER BY SPECIFYING 

I0O TNPU1 *G* ;n*'F'*F.'rr ;()."«: -;c 
2010 y=4.2 IF 
2020 C=C*'E-4 

to RJ uif:*c> 

2040 R5=2*G*Pi 
2050 R : - R I iR3 * 4*0*0 *R 1 - ^ 

r>o ir R3 FHEW PRINT *N0TE - NEGATIVE VALUE OF R3 1 

*70 GOTO 4 000 

9? REM HI V 1GK BY SPECIFY IHG INPUT IMPEDANCE* 0*F AND C 

00 INPUT "klSRl^O'fnt'FMFt'C'fC 
3010 U*6«2832*F 

1020 c - c * i ir: ■■* 

3030 G^G/<W*ft1*C> 

1040 R5~2*G*R1 

30'.. R3Hftl*R«/<4*Q*B*RJ i 

3060 IF OR] THEN PRINT "NOTE - NEGATIVE VALUE OF R3 * 

'0 GOTO 4000 
3999 REM OUTPUT SECTION FOR AFOVE SEGMENTS 
00 PRINT 
TO PRINT 
402O PRINT 'FOR THIS DESIGN* 
PRINT *R1-"I Rli'ONllS" 



4040 


rNT , R3-»*R3; , DHHS* 


4050 


PRINT *R5-" fR5f •OHMS' 


40 -SO 


C1-C*1EA 


4070 


PRINT *| ' ! 4 'MICROFARADS' 


40 RO 


INT '* * 


'0 


PRINT •U- , *G 


<>0 


PRINT *0»*fO 




PPIMT 


11 


PRIM I 


4 1 SO 


INPUT -|I0 YOU WISH TO CONTINUE t OR N' rX* 


1 MO 


Yt*='tt m 


i l' 


. "f-"Y* 


■■ttO 


j:|- m "Yl^i THEN 999V 


11 '■ 


fl'" K* V2I THEN 200 


41 HO 


GOTO 4 I JO 


\9?9 


l-.Trt SCALE FREQUENCY tit CKANCING CAPACITORS 


00 


IF THE^» *Q 




rPTNT •TANNOl SCALE UNTIL VALUES APF DETERMINED 


50. 


GOTO 2^0 


JO 


INPOT 'NFy FREOUFNrf •:< 


40 


C-C»f 


5£ 


F=y 


5 ' ■V 1 *- ' L 


GOTO 40«- 


jo 


REN SCAI r fREOUEWrt KY CHANGING RESISTORS 




IF I IMFN S010 


JJO 


INPUT -NILJ I » ! QUENCY* JFO 


. 30 


i.-i- | • . 


S .30 


R1 I | m 


', ',40 


1 : ' ! ii 




R^IVM |i 


■ . 60 


i 1 


■ 

■ ■ 


MM 




REM SCALE IMPEDANCE Of ALL COPfPONFNTS 




Ti PI o rHEN 5O10 




INPNT Vlfu VALUE 01 CAPACtTQR'ICO 




r.:^fiE-.6/c 




o 


10 


P3 




R3^R3/D 




R 1 : n 




HO 4000 


<**? 


RFrt i 1 DENI rCAl Lin. 




INPU1 "HOW MANY -i ■ r I |HN' , .*;N 


...| .. 


TNPMI H u 1 IP =IFC M |j - ■ u | . - , 1 l i. .'ilIDM'H'1 


■ '0 


.. '-J i | .i-, r , ,, ,i. f , ..i] {in , 


■ i so 


W'1 ^L)'! '■ I'.jppi B*v, 


1 4 o 


i ■ . ■; r: 5K iiJRl (^SH 4) 




I lot- .in. 0p(W2> 


. ,. 


o- 1 




TrT -1 Ml *SF< f ION M HF II >I01 




ff: i • rAi n ■ '»a 


■ 






• 






PF 



78 73 Magazine • January, 1983 






this article was written to 
allow one to perform com- 
puter-aided design of sec- 
ond-order MFB filters 

The circuit diagram of an 
MFB filter is shown in Fig, 1. 
The labeling of the compo- 
nents is the same as that 
used in the program The 
equations for performing 
the design are listed in 
Table 1. Most general-pur- 



pose op amps can be used 
in the filter. 

This program has been 
written in such a manner as 
to be as versatile as possi- 
ble- It should be helpful to 
the person wishing to de- 
sign a filter of specified pa- 
rameters and equally use- 
ful to the person who 
wishes to alter some param- 
eter or component value in 



an existing MFB filter de- 
sign. Take note: There are 
intrinsic limitations on the 
Q, gain, and center frequen- 
cy of MFB filters which are 
not discussed in this article. 
The reader who is unfamil- 
iar with these [imitations 
should consult one of the 
references at the end of this 
article. 

The program has seven 



possibilities for design, as 
follows: 

1) Specify the values for 
R1, R3, and R5 in Ohms and 
C in uF. The program will 
calculate Q, C (the pass- 
band gain), and F (the cen- 
ter frequency, in Hz). This 
segment is useful in check* 
ing the parameters of a fil- 
ter using the values of the 
available components, 



Sample printout. 



Y0< VOICES ARE AS FOLLOWS 



I - CHOOSE RJ - 

CHOOSE G- 

CHOOSE RI , 
4 - JiCALE FRI UUENCY 

SCALE FREOUENCY 
n SCALE IMPEDANCE 
7 - DO CALCULAI tONS 



R3t R3 ANH 

AND C 
F . P AMI' C 



BY CHANGING CAPACITORS 
»:r t HANGING RESISTORS 
OF COMPONENTS 
FOR CASCADED SECT TONS 



ENTT R THE 
RI? 68E3 

R5T 1Q0E3 



FOB THIS DESIGN 
Rl« 480O0 OHMS 
R3 = 4300 OHM 
R5 180000 OHMS 

,015 MICROFARADS 
F= 393,253 HERTZ 
U- 3*3337 



NUMBER CORRESPONDING TO TOUR CHQr »:*:''* ! 



= I ♦ .323 5i£ 



Oft Nf Y 



00 YOU WISH ID CONTINUI Y 
YOUR CHOICES ARE AS FIJI I I.IU5 

1 - CHOOSE RI- R3? R5 ANJi C 

CHOOSE: Gr Q. F AND 

3 - CHOOSE ft]« Fi Q AND C 

4 SCALE FREOUENCY BY CHANGING CAPACITORS 

5 - SCALE FREOUENCY BY CHANGING RESISTORS 

6 - SCALE IMPE DANCE OF COMPONENTS 

J DO CALCULATIONS FOR CASCADED SECTIONS 

ENTER THE NUrtpER CORRESPONDING TO YOUR CHOICE? 2 

ST 1*33 

F? 400 

QT 4.0 

CV ,015 



2 - I HOOSE Gp 

3 - CHOOSE R! ■ 

4 - SCALE FRf-NHI-NCY 

5 - SCALE FREQUENCY 
A - SCALE IMPEDANCE 
7 - DO CALCULATIONS 



Q i F AND C 
Ff AND C 



flY CHANGING CAPACITORS 
BY CHANG I N6 RESIST M- 
OF COMPONENTS 



FOR CASCAriED SECriONS 
ENTER THE NUMBER CORRESPONDING TO YOUR CHOICE* 4 
NEW FREQUENCY? AOO 



FOR THIS DESTDN 


r:i= soooo dhms 


hi A- 4049* 7? OHMS 


RS« 1H91SS OHMS 


c= 


,01 MICROFARADS 


F= 


AOO HFRTZ 


ii - 


3 


= 


1 .5*155 



Dfi i nil UIHH TO CONTINUE Y OR 
YOUR CHOICES ARE AS FOLLOW 

1 CHOOSE Rlt R3f R5 AND C 

2 - CHOUSE Or 0- F AND ■ 

3 choose ri ■ - ft AND i 

4 - SCALE FREQUENCY 
'h ■ ftCAi E- F ivi GHJENCY 

6 - SCALE ZMPEIiAN' I 

7 - DO CALCUI Al TONS 

ENlfrh THE NUMRI (- CORRESPONDING TO 
Nl u FREQUENCY ? BOO 



FOR THIS DESIGN 

K1-- 37500 OHMS 

*A3^.33 OHMS 
R5~ 119366 OHM 
C<* .01 MICROFARADS 
BOO HERTZ 

a 3 



i 



DY CHANOINS CAPACITORS 
BY CHANGING RESI8T0RS 
Of CONPQNEN 
FOR " ADEJJ SI l I KINS 

YOUP CHU 



FOR THIS DESIGN 
Rl= 59832.5 OHMS 
R3* 4773 «6B OHMS 
RS= 159155 OHMS 
C= .015 MICRCIf ARAD3 

400 HERTZ 
G= 
B= 1. 33 



00 YOU WISH TO CONTINUE - Y OR N? Y 
YOUR CHOICES ARE AS FOLLOWS 

1 CHOOSE Rlt R3* R5 AND ' 

2 - CHOOSE Gr 11- F AN!' C 

3 - CHOOSE Ri, Ft AND C 

4 ALE FREOUENCY FY CHANGING CAPACITORS 

5 - ^CALE FREOUENCY BY CHANGING RESISTORS 

6 - SCALE IMPEDANCE OF COMPONENTS 

7 - DO CALCUI AT IONS FOR 1'ASCADFD SECTIONS 
ENTER THE NUMBER CORRESPONDING TO YOUR CHOICE? 3 
RI* T.0E3 

0? S 
F? 400 
C* iotti 



FOR THIS DF SIGN 
•000 ON 
4U*v . OHMS 

159155 OWN! 

r> ,ois MXCRUFARAOH 

F* 400 HERTZ 

I. I , 5915S 



DO YOU WISH TO CONTINUE' ■ t 
YOUR CHOICES AIL AS FOLLOWS 



UP N* Y 



[in mil UISH hi i MNTINiu i 

rOUfl CHOICES ARF AS FGLLOUS 
1 rHQOSE Rlt R3# R5 ftNft C 



Of- N 



1 
2 
3 
4 

5 
A 
7 



FHODSE RI w R3f R5 AND 
CHOOSE Gf Op F AND C 
CHOOSE RI w Ft AND C 
faCALE FRFOUEN 

FRtUUfcvNLT 

IMPE DANCE 

CULA1 IONS 



SCflLL 
5CAL E 
pa I^AI 

KNTER THE 
NEW VALUE 



NUMBER CORREBF'ONDING 
OF ' I i»C] TORT ( 



FY CHANGING CAPACITORS 
*it l. h A Nu ING RE&XSTORS 
OF COMPONENTS 

FOR CAtiCAIiEfl SECTIONS 

Til YnUR CHOICE? 



* 



FOR THIS DESIGN 
hi 18750 OHMS 

10,67 OHMS 

iS3 UH 
C~ ,02 MICROFARADS 
\'= 800 HERTZ 
O 

I t 5? 3 r -p5 



= • ii i Utm TO CONTINUE Y OR N? Y 
«n:ES ARE AS FOLLiiU:, 
i - CHOOSE ftl » R3p R5 AND C 
CHOOSE G» Or F AND C 
CHOOSE Rlw Ft O ANIi I 
SCAl F FREOUENCY 
'ICALE FREOUENCY 
,*LE IMPEDANCE 
00 CALCULATIONS 



T - 

4 - 

5 - 

6 - 

7 - 



BY CHANGING CAPACITORS 
BY CHANGING RESISTORS 
OF COMPONENTS 

FOR CASCADED SECTIONS 
ENTER IHE NUMftER CORRESPONDING 10 YOUR CHOICE? 7 
MilU MANY SECOND ORDER SECTIONS? 4 

Q PER SECTION- '. 

DA IN lEFi 1 SECTION? I -'■■ 

FOR 4 SECTIONS EACH OF Q | 

THf L JS A.eVASO 

IE GAIN OF THE SYSTEM IS 6*39129 



73 Magazine * January. 1983 79 




Fig. 1* Schematic of a second-order, multiple-feedback band- 
pass filter. The notation is the same as that of the program. 



R1 = 



_ Q 



2*FGC 



A3 _ Q 

" 2nFC(2Q 2 - G) 



R5 = ^ 
nCF 



Table 1. 

2) Specify the values of 
G, F, Q P and C. The program 
will calculate the values of 
R1, R3, and R5 Since resis- 
tors are usually more read- 
ily available than capac- 
itors, this portion should be 
useful when the gain, Q p 
and center frequency are 
critical to the proper opera- 
tion of the device. 

3) Specify the values of 
R1, Q, F, and C. This seg- 



ment is useful if one is try* 
ing to achieve a certain in- 
put impedance and the gain 
is not too critical, 

4) This section allows one 
to change the center fre- 
quency of a previously de- 
signed filter by changing the 
value of the capacitors 

5) In this segment, one 
can change the center fre- 
quency by changing the 
value of the resistors, 

6) This segment scales 
the impedance of the com- 
ponents in an Mf-B filter 
while retaining the same F. 
Q, and C. One chooses the 
new value for the capaci- 
tors and the program cal- 
culates the values of the 
resistors to maintain the 
same Q, F P and C This is a 



useful feature if the desired 
values of C are not avail 
able and substitutes must 
be used. 

7) This section allows one 
to predict the net Q and C 
of cascaded identical MFB 
sections. For example, three 
sections each of gain 2 
and Q == 1 .0 yield a net gain 
of 8.0 and a net Q of 1 96 
Thus, there is a law of di- 
minishing returns for the Q 
of cascaded sections. An 
unrealistic calculation 
shows that 120 cascaded 
sections each of Q = 2X) 
would yield a net Q of 263! 

The program has been 
written so that only the de- 
sired sections need be en- 
tered into the computer, in 
case a mass-storage device 
is not available. The pro- 
gram should run with no dif- 
ficulty on any computer in 
which the BASIC has both 
floating-point arithmetic 
and string variables. Only 
minor modification would 
be needed to run the pro- 
gram on a machine that 



does not have string vari- 
ables This program has 
been run successfully on an 
8K Pet 

To illustrate the use of 
the program, a sample print- 
out has been included. It 
should be mentioned that 
several of the computer- 
generated designs were 
built on a breadboard and 
that the measured perfor- 
mance agreed very well with 
the theoretically predicted 
performance. ■ 

References 

1. "Design Your Own Active Fil- 
ters," K M. Berlin, QST, June, 
1977. 

2. "Active Bandpass Filters," 
T. A. Conboy, Ham Radio, De- 
cember, 1977. 

3. The Radio Amateur's Hand- 
book, Fifty-sixth edition, Amer- 
ican Radio Relay League. New- 
ington CT. 

4. The Active Fitter Cookbook, 
#21168, Howard W. Sams, In- 
dianapolis IN r 1975. 

5. Design of Active Filters, With 
Experiments, H. M, Berlin, 
#21359, Howard VU Sams, In- 
dianapolis IN t 1978. 



FILTER CASCADING 



The most c&st-efleclive way to improve the selectivity 
of any receiver - old or new - is to impr ove its (F filtering 
A Fox-Tango Cascading Kit puts a high-quality steep- 
sided 8-po!e filter in series with your present filters), 
both 5 SB and CW The result is narrower Bandwidth 
and better Shape Factor, both of which dramatical I y 
reduce adjacent channel QRM - a necessity tn todays 
crowded bands. 

CONSIDER THESE KIT FEATURES 

• Easy installation - 30 minute average 

• No drilling, switching, alignment 

• 16 poles of filleting yield: 

Filter Shape Factor as high as 119. 
Ultimate Rejection better than 1 00dB. 
Works wonders on SS8; improves CW. 

• Compensates for RUer Insertion loss, 

• Complete instructions, clear diagrams. 

• No RX audio impairment, TX unaffected 

• Includes Filter and all needed parts 

• Fits alt models of Series - any letter 

• Ail Filters S-pole - Gua/anteed One Year. 

SPECIFY KIT WANTED WHEN ORDERING 

YAESU FT101 S75; FT101ZD $70; FT107 $75: 
FT901/2 $65; FR1Q1 $55 (titter only). KENWOOD 
TS520/R599 $70; TSS20S70: TS830/RB20S150 
(Two Filters). HEATH SBI04A $60. 

Shipping $3 (Air $5) FL Sales Tax 5% 

In addition to the above, FOX- TAN GO stocks a wide 
line of $55 SSB, CW. and AM 8-pole filters tor Yaesu, 
Kenwood, Drake R4C and 7-Nne, and Heathfcit. Also, 
special titers made to ofder Send specs for quote 

GO FOX-TANGO - TO BE SURE! 
Order by Mail or Telephone. 

AUTHORIZED EUROPEAN AGENTS 

Scandinavia MICRO TEC < Norway) 

Other INGOIMPEX (West Germany) 



FOX TANGO CORPORATION 
Box 15944S. W Palm Beach, FL 33406 
Phone (3051 683-958? 323 



80 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



ALL BAND TRAP ANTENNAS ! 




™ <nmr> 



PRETUNED - COMPLETELY ASSEMBLED - 
ONLY ONE NEAT SMALL ANTENNA FOR 
UP TO 7 BANDS! EXCELLENT FOR CON- 
GESTED HOUSING AREAS * APARTMENTS 
LIGHT - STRONG - ALMOST INVISIBLE! 






FOR ALL MAKLb i MODELS OF AMATEUR 
TRANSCEIVERS - TRANSMITTERS -GUAR- 
ANTEED FOR 2000 WATTS SSB TOQO 
WATTS CW. INPUT FOR NOVICE AND ALL 
CLASS AMATEURS! IMPROVED DESIGN! 



COMPLETE AS SHOWN wfth 90 ft. RG53U-52 ohm feeding ftnd PL259 connector^ insutatorv 30 ft. 
300 lb. test dacron end sue pons, center connector with built In lightning arrester and mtatlc dli charge - 
mgided, lealect weatherproof . resoivam traps r - X6"'- you ju*t switch to band desired for excellent worldwide 
operation - transmitting and recievkng* LowSWR over »U hands -Tuner* ua u a ly NOT NEEDED! Can he used as 
inverted V's - stopers - in attits, on building tops or narrow lots , The OMVt ANTENNA YOU WILL EVER NEED 
FOR ALL DESIRED BANDS -WITH ANY TRANSCEIVER - NEW - EXCLUSIVE! NO BALUNS NEEDED! 

B0-4Q-20-l5-10-6meter~2 trap — 1Q4H. with 90 ft. RG58U -connector *Model Q9QBUC . . , $69.95 

40*20*15*10 meter-*. 2 trap «- 54 ft- with 90 It RG5 8U - connector - Model 10O1BUC $6895 

2O-15-10 meter *~ 2 trap — 2$u> w nh 90 ft. RG58U - connector - Model 10O7BUC $87.95 

SEND FULL PRICE FOR POSTPAID INSURED DEU IN USA. ^Canada is $5.0O e*tf* for postage - clerical - 
c« stoma etc.)or order iiaLdq VISA - MASTER CARD • AMER, EXPRESS, Give number and ex. date- 
Ph 1-30&V236-5333 9AM * 6PM week days. We ship in 2-3 clays, ALL PRICES MAY INCREASE , . 

SAVE - ORDER NOWl All antennas guaranteed for 1 year. 10 day money back trial it returned In new condition! 
Made In USA. FREE INFO AVAILABLE ONLY FROM 

WESTERN ELECTRONICS Oopl. A7 1 Kearney, Nebraska, 68847 ^ ®Q 




T 




PORTAPEATER 

S 179,00 assembled M 100 A S99.00 assembled 

INSTANT REPEATER 






unit 



board 



*4Channel PROM 
CW 1 Der 

•VOX or COR 

operation 



*250volt 
switching 
capability 

"An Instant 
Repeater 



* Works with any 

ANY BAND ANY MODE 'yp« ***** 



* Complete Timer 

Functions 



t * 



PORTAPEATER 



T-i-r. 




* Built In Teat 
Functions 

• 20 Page 
Technical Manual 



(Fully tested, programmed, assembled) ^302 

W-S ENGINEERING P.O. BOX 58, PINE HILL, N.J. 08021 

I (201 -852-0269) \ ~ 



J 




TE-12P 



a 



00 



















£> 




f 












* f 



•V 



^Kv' 






* 






m\ 



Stuck with a 




lem? 



OurTE-12P Encoder might be just the solution to pull 
you out of a sticky situation. Need a different CTCSS 
tone for each channel in a multi-channel Public Safety 
System? How about customer access to multiple re- 
peater sites on the same channel? Or use it to generate 
any of the twelve tones for EMS use. Also r it can be used 
to access Amateur repeaters or just as a piece of ver- 
satile test equipment. Any of the CTCSS tones may be 
accessed with the TE-12PA, any of the audible frequen- 
cies with the TE-12PB. Just set a dip switch, no test 
equipment is required. As usual, we're a stickler for 
1day delivery with a full 1 year warranty. 

• Output level flat to within 1.5db over entire range selected, 
» Immune to RF. 

• Powered by 6~30vdc, unregulated at 8 ma. 

• Low impedance, low distortion, adjustable sinewave output, 
5v peak-to-peak. 

• Instant start-up. 




TE-12PA 



67.0X2 
71.9 XA 

74.4 WA 
77.0 XB 
79.7 SP 

82.5 YZ 



85.4 YA 

88.5 YB 
91.5 ZZ 

94.8 ZA 

97.4 ZB 

100.0 1Z 



103.51 A 
107.2 1B 
1 10.9 22 

114.8 2A 
118.8 2B 
123.0 32 



127.3 3A 

131.8 3B 
13&5 4Z 
141 3 4A 
146.2 4B 

151.4 5Z 



156.7 5A 
182.2 5B 

167.9 6Z 
173-86A 
179.9 68 
186-2 7Z 



192,8 7A 

203.5 M1 






• Frequency accuracy, ±.1 Hz maximum -40*Cto +85*C 

• Frequencies to 250 Hz available on special order. 
•Continuous tone 



TE-12PB 



TEST TONES: 


TOUCH-TONES: 


BURSTTONES: 


600 


697 1209 


1800 1850 2150 2400 


1000 


770 1336 


1650 1900 2200 2450 


1500 


852 1 477 


1700 1950 2250 2500 


2175 


941 1633 


1750 2000 2300 2550 


2805 




1800 2100 2350 



•Frequency accuracy, ±1 Hz maximum -40'Cto + 85X 

• Tone length approximately 300 ms, May be lengthened* 

shortened or eliminated by changing value of resistor 



$89.95 



*-T5 




COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS 



426 West Taft Avenue, Orange, California 92667 
(800)854-0547/California: (714) 998-3021 



e 
















■ B" Djg-J ■ 




fr , 










NEW SCR77 




ctrum now makes 2 (fries of 
Repeaters— the world famous 
_,_[>er Deluxe' SCR10Q0M0Q0, 
and our new Low Cost line of 
SCR77 Repeaters/Link Trans- 
ceivers. 

The New SCR77 10-30 Wi Re- 
peaters maintain the quality of 
design, components and con* 
struction which have made 

Spectrum gear famous through- 
out the world for years. How- 
ever, all of the "bells & whistles" 
which you may no! need or want 
have been eliminated— at a 
targe cost savings to you* The 
SCR77 is a real "workhorse" ba- 
ste machine designed for those 
who want excellent, super- 
reliable performance year after 
year— but no friris! ("PL'. 12 Pole 
IF Filter. Front End PreseJector, 
and a 30 Wt. Transmitter are the 
; only "built-in' oplircrv ailable; 
but Autopatch, Remote Control, 
and other equipment^ can be 
connected via the rear panel 
jack.) 



SCR1000/4000 & xcvrs. F.ac. 

TYPE ACCEPTED FOR COMMER 
CIAL SERVICES. 



Of course, if you do want a full 

featured/Super Deluxe Repeal- 
er, with higher power (30-75 
Wtsj, and a full list of built in' 
Options, then you want our 
SCR 1000 or 4000 — 'The Ulti- 
mate in Repeaters" Available 
_ with: Full Autopatch/Reverse 

Shown in PatcrvLandLine Control. Touch 

Optional Cabinet , Tone Control of various repeater 

functions; PL Emergency 
Pwr. ID": various Tone & Timer 
Units, eta Rack mount Link 
Rcvrs & Xmtrs also available. 

Cait or write today for data sheets & prices! Sold Factory Direct or through Export Safes 
Reps only. Get your order in A.S.A.R! 



NOW LOCATED IN OUR NEW LARGER PLANT! 
THANKS FOR YOUR 8+ YEARS OF SUPPORT! 




SPECTRUM 

Export Orders Welcomed 



1055 W, GERMANTOWN PK M DEPT S1| 



82 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



Sp£c @omm 1^£p£a£bi Soandx. & Su&-44*X£*h$Ic£4. 



5CR200 4 
SCR 450 
BOARD 



Tnesa ere Ptotasstonat "Commmtctat Grade" t/mrs — Designed tor fif^me Environments f - 30 to + GO* C) 

All equipment assembled A tested For 2M. 220 MHz & 450 MHz* 



WM ALSO 
AVAILABLE 



• r^^e^e™ 



TOM ALSO 

4VA/LA8LE 



a-hi'ii .»>* 



FL6 



SCR200 VHF Receiver Board 

■ Totmtit H9W Advanced Desfgft/ 

• B Pot© Front End Fllr + wide dynamic 
range— reduces overload. Spurious Reap & 

Mel 

i Sana 0.3 uV/12dH StNAD typ 
aSel odB @ ± 6 5 KHz 130dB % ±30KKz (B 
Pole Crystal + 4 Pole Ceramic Fltra. 

• 'S Meier,' Discriminator & Deviation Mir. Out- 
puts! 

• Emc audio quality* Fast squelch* «/uOOD5% 

Crystal rSufiaw Sharp" tF Fttr also avail , 

5CR200 Receiver Assembly 

• SCR 200 mounted in ahleided howling 

• Completely aambld A tested. w/FT caps, 
S0239conn 

• A*> used in ihe SCttiOQQ Ready to drop into your 
system' High Recommended* 

•Also available in 19" Rack Mount 
SCR450 UHF Receiver Bd, or Assy. 

e Similar to SCR20CL except 420-470MHZ 




SCAP Autopatch Board 

• Provides all basic autopalch functions 

• Secure 3 Digit Access; 1 Auk On Qlf function 
Audio AGC h Bui 1 1 in timers, etc Beautiful Audio! 

• OH inhlWt txf also available 

• WritercaM for details and a data sheet 

RPCM Board 

• Used w/SCAP board 10 provide Reverse Patch 
and Land Line Control of Repeater 

• Includes land hne answering circuitry 

10250 CW ID t Audio Mixer Board 

• Adrusiab-'e 10 tone speed. ie»ei timing cycle 

• 4 Input AF Mixer * Local Mic imp 

• COR mpul & irfitr hold Circuits 

• CMOS loflrc. PROM memory- ?50 Ptts/ch anna i 

• Up lo * different i0 channels 1 

• Many other features Factory Programmed 



FL-6 ficvr. Front-End Preselector 

• 6 Hi O Resonators with Lo-Noise Transistor Amp (2M of 
220 MHiJ 

• Provides tremendous r»| action ot out of band signals 
wiout the usual loss 1 Can often be used instead ni large 
expensive cavMy filters 

• Extremely helpful at sties with many nearby VHF transmit 
ers to filler out these out of band signals 

CTC100 Rptr. COR Timer/Control Bd. 

• Complete sc4id stale controt for rptr COR. "Hang' 
Timer, ""hme-Oui" Timer, TX Shutdowns Reset, etc 

e Includes Inputs 4 Outputs for panel controls & lamps 



Repeater Tone A Control Bdi - For SCRIOOOMOOO 

• CTC100/1D250 oofy 

TRA-1 "Courtesy Tone Beeper" Board 

• Puts out a tone beep apx i sec after RX s«g 
drops — thus allowing lime tor breaker 

• Resets T O Timer after "beep" 

TMR-1 "Kerchunker Kilter or "Time Out Warning 
Tone" Bd 

• For One of above 2 functions 

• "Kerchunker Killer provides ad| delay |01Q 
sec .) for initial rptr access Au to Reset at end of 

oso 

• TO Warning Tone provides alerting war&ie 
tone apH tO sec be tore time out 







PSNM Repeater Power Supply Mod Kit 

e For SCR 1 000 or SCR-4000 

• Replaces Darlington Pass It —tor improved 
rajlabittty 

• Includes new overvpitege Crowbar" shut 
down circuit 



Complete hit. wfassemOEed PC board J19 50 
- S3 bO shipping handling 



- *" 



J 



SCT410 XMTR T ASSY. 



SCT1 10 VHF Xmtr/Exclter Board 

• 7 ot 10 Wts Output 100% Duty Cycle* 

• Infinite VSWR proof 

• True FM for exc audio qualify 

• Designed specifically for continuous rptr ser 
vice Vary low in "white noise 

• Spurious 70 tfB Harmonics ^60 dB 

• With ,0005% xtai. 

• BA 10 30 Wt. Amp board & Heat Sink, 3 sec L P 
Filler & ret pwr sensor BA75 75 Wt unit also 
available 

SCT1 10 Transmitter Assembly 

+ SCT1 JO mounted *n shielded housing 

• Same as used on SCR 1 000 

• Completely ass mbld w/FT. caps, SQ239 conn 

• 10. 30. or 75 Wt unit 

SCT410 UHF Transmitter Bd, or Assy* 

• Strmtar jo SCTf rQ, W Wis nom 

• Avail w; or wro OS-IS Super High Stability 
Crystal OacJQvan. 

• BA-40 40W, UHF AMP. BD, & HEAT SINK. 



PCB 1 Xmtr. Power Control Board 

• For SCTiiOor SCT4iOE»ctters 

• Varies 8 + to control Pwr Out 

• Switchabie Hi. Low, or Med Pwr out, locally or 
remotely Adj levels 



r,-^ 



TTC100 Touchtone 



Control Board 



PRM200 Power Supply Filter 
Cap/Regulator/Metering Board 

• As used in the SCR 1 000 as main pan of 
13.SVDCAA Pwr Sply, 

• Includes 1 4.000 M F Filter Cap, Reg IC and Drrvet 
Trans,. V/i Meter shunts and cat pots 

• Requires Xtmr. s Br Reel., Pass Tr .'Heat Sink, {Op- 
tional Meier}, for complete supply 



any j^<te&& &i fTF4y&£em { 

• 3 digit ON, 3 digit OFF control of a single repeater 
function, or (optional) 2 Junctions |2 digjls ON/OFF 
each) 

• Can be used to pull in a relay, trigger logic, etc 

• Typically used tor Rptr. ON/OFF, Hl/LO Pwr PL 
ON/OFF. Patch Inhibit/Reset, etc 

• Stable antr-falsmg design 5s limit on access 

■ For add! funclkmls), add a "Parttat TTC" board 



COMMUNICATIONS CORP. 



INQUIRE ABOUT SURPLUS* RX 4 TX BOARDS. REDUCED PRICE! 

Nomstown, PA 19401 • <215) 63M710I 



*^68 



Cait, or 
Send tor 
Dat* Sneefsf 



See Ltsi ot Advertisers on page J14 



73 Magazine * January, 1983 83 



The Cornerstone of Equipment 

Failure: Heat Damage 

The proper heat sink will preserve transistors. Learn how to keep 

your circuitry from resembling a core meltdown. 



Kenneth H. Shamhurger 
1413 Clendale 
Creenvitte TX 7540t 



Heat is a hazard to all 
electronics profects. 
Many electronics enthusi- 
asts have experienced the 
displeasure of watching a 
prized project destroy itself 
with heat. Understanding 
heat transfer and heat-sink 
selection is necessary to 
avoid this hazard. 

This article explains the 
fundamentals of heat-sink 
selection, which are easy to 
understand and apply. It 
begins with a review of the 
ways heat is transferred, ex- 




plains how to calculate the 
temperature inside a semi- 
conductor component, pro- 
vides an example of heat- 
sink selection, and contrib- 
utes some hints for inter- 
preting semiconductor and 
heat-sink thermal specifica- 
tions, 

The Review 

"Heat transfer" is more 
accurate in describing the 
removal of heat than "heat 
flow" The word "flow' lim- 
its the possibilities we asso- 
ciate with the phenomenon 
to a single action — such as 
water flowing. Heat is trans- 
ferred by three mecha- 
nisms. 

It is transferred by radia- 
tion as an electromagnetic 





f*t 



{*> 



re/ 



Fig. 7. Heat transfer from a transistor: (a) from chip to case 
by radiation; (b) from chip to case by conduction; (c) from 
case to air by convection. 

84 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



wave. The heat transmitted 
from the sun through the 
vacuum of space to the 
Earth is an example of radi- 
ation. 

Heat is transferred by 
conduction when two ob- 
jects are in contact, A sol- 
dering iron melts solder by 
conduction. 

Heat is transferred by 
convection when a fluid 
medium, such as air, moves 
across the surface of an ob- 
ject The air drawn through 
the radiator of your auto- 
mobile cools the radiator 
by convection. When air is 
blown across an object, it is 
called forced convection. 
But, the air surrounding a 
warm object will rise, caus- 
ing cooler air to replace it 
without the aid of a fan. 
When air is allowed to cir- 
culate by heating, it is 
called natural convection, 

Heat is transferred from 
semiconductor devices by 
all three mechanisms, as il- 
lustrated bv the transistor 
in Fig. 1 It is radiated from 
the transistor chip to the 
case (a) and is conducted to 
the case where the sub- 
strate and case are in con- 
tact (b), The heat trans- 



ferred to the case distrib- 
utes itself throughout the 
case by conduction and, 
then, is transferred to the 
surrounding air by convec- 
tion (c). If a heat sink is at 
tached to the transistor, 
heat is transferred from the 
transistor case to the heat 
sink by conduction and to 
the surrounding air by con- 
vection, Also, it is radiated 
from the case and heat sink 
to objects nearby, 

However, the amount of 
heat transferred by radia- 
tion is a small percentage of 
the heat transferred by con- 
vection. For this reason, the 
heat transfer equations typ- 
ically used in heat-sink se- 
lection calculate only the 
heat transferred by natural 
convection. Similarly, the 
heat transferred by radia- 
tion from the chip to the 
case does not receive spe- 
cial attention in the calcu- 
lations. And despite the in- 
accuracy, convenience 
makes us think of heat as 
flowing. These simplifica- 
tions ease the analysis pro- 
cess. 

Not all heat generated in 
the transistor is transferred 
to the air. Each segment of 



the path between the chip 
and the air resists heat flow 
in a manner similar to a re- 
sistor resisting current flow. 
The heat retained in the 
transistor because of this 
impedance causes the tem- 
perature of the chip to rise. 
Our goal is to determine the 
temperature of the transis- 
tor chip. The chances of its 
destruction then can be 
evaluated. 

The Fundamentals 

In classical physics, 
equations have been devel- 
oped for calculating the 
amount of heat transferred; 
they are not complicated. 
However, their solution de- 
pends upon parameters 
which are difficult to eval- 
uate in practice. For this 
reason, engineers have de- 
vised equations which do 
not use these parameters, 
but which make heat flow 
analogous to electric cur- 
rent flow. In this analogy, a 
heat source is analogous to 
a current source, thermal 
resistance to electrical re- 
sistance, and temperature 
to voltage. The equation re- 
lating them is like Ohm's 
Law and says that the differ- 
ence in temperature (volt- 
age drop) across a thermal 
resistance is equal to the 
thermal resistance multi- 
plied by the heat (current) 
flowing through the resis- 
tance. This thermal equiva- 
lent to Ohm's Law is ex- 
pressed by the equation T 
= eP, 

The symbol ©, with sub- 
scripts to indicate the cir- 
cuit connections, common- 
ly represents thermal resis- 
tance. For example, e |C is 
the thermal resistance be- 
tween the transistor chip 
and its case, (The capital 
"}" 4 for junction, is used 
widely to represent the 
source of heat in semicon- 
ductor components.) Val- 
ues of thermal resistance 
for semiconductor compo- 
nents and heat sinks are us- 
ually obtained from their 
respective specifications. 
In an electronic compo- 
nent, heat originates as 





t jA »«*C/w 




Fig. 2. Thermal circuit for a 
semiconductor. 



power dissipated by the 
device. The thermal anal- 
ogy carries this into the 
electrical thermal model by 
making power, identified 
by a capita] "P," equal to 
heat. (Sometimes the 
lowercase "q" is used to 
represent power because 
this symbol is used for heat 
in physics.) 

The Calculations 

Our goal is twofold. First, 
we must determine the tem- 
perature of the semicon- 
ductor chip If this tempera- 
ture exceeds a safe value, 
we must determine the ther- 
mal specifications for a 
heat sink which will provide 
adequate transfer away 
from the transistor. Using 
the electrical thermal anal- 
ogy, the calculations in- 
volved in both tasks are 
similar to electric circuit 
calculations. 

A diagram for the ther- 
mal circuit of a transistor is 
illustrated in Fig. 2, The 
unique feature of this dia- 
gram is the voltage source 
labeled T A . This addition 
does not alter the validity 
of the model. The proper- 
ties of the theoretically per- 
fect current source (labeled 
P) do not allow current to 
flow backward through it. 
Since it is the only source of 
current in the circuit, the 
current flowing through the 
circuit equals P. The 
voltage source is simply a 
way of representing the 
temperature of the sur- 
rounding air (called theam- 
bient temperature). It is con- 
venient to include it so that 
the ambient temperature 
appears in Kirchoffs volt- 
age equations for the cir- 
cuit. Some people, choos- 
ing to account for T A later 




Fig, 3. Thermal circuit for a Fig. 4. Thermal circuit for 
semiconductor with a heat the example without a heat 
sink, sink. 



in the analysis, do not in- 
clude this source. 

A resistor represents the 
thermal resistance of each 
segment along the path be- 
tween the semiconductor 
junction and the ambient. 
Each segment can be identi- 
fied by the letters compris- 
ing its subscripts. Beginning 
at the junction, these are JC 
for junction-to-case and CA 
for case-to-ambient. 

The thermal analogy for 
Kirchoffs Voltage Law says 
that the temperature of a 
semiconductor chip is 

equal to the sum of the tem- 
perature drops around the 
remainder of the circuit 
This is expressed by the 
equation T| = Tjc+ Tca + 
Ta, where Tj is the semicon- 
ductor chip temperature, 
Tjc is the temperature drop 
across ©je, Tca is the tem- 
perature drop across ©ca, 
and Ta is the ambient tem- 
perature. The values of Tjc 
and Tca can be calculated 
from the thermal equiva- 
lent of Ohm's Law. Substi- 
tuting these into the above 
equation, the junction tem- 
perature equation becomes 
T, = (e iC + e CA ) P + T At 

Many times, a manufac- 
turer specifies a value for 
Qj A , which is the thermal re- 
sistance between the junc- 
tion and the ambient, ©ja is 
equal to the sum of e^- and 
Sca and may be used in the 
preceding equation instead. 

A thermal circuit which 
includes the thermal resis- 
tances associated with a 
heat sink is illustrated in 
Fjg. 3 The case-to-ambient 
resistance, e CA( has been re- 
placed by two resistances, 
the case-to-sink resistance, 
©cs* and the sink-to-ambi- 
ent resistance, ©sa When 

73 



Fig. 5. Thermal circuit for 
the example with a heat 
sink, 



these are substituted for 
&CA, the equation for the 
semiconductor junction 
temperature becomes T| = 

(e,c + ©cs + ©sa)P + T a , 
A heat sink is selected on 
the basis of its ©sa, which 
characterizes its ability to 
transfer heat into the sur- 
rounding air. To determine 
the largest value of ©sa that 
will maintain a safe semi- 
conductor temperature, the 
equation is solved for ©$a 
This yields the following 
equation: © SA - [(Tj - T A 1/P] 

-(e |C +©cs)- 

An Example 

Suppose you are design- 
ing an audio amplifier You 
have estimated the power 
dissipation of the output 
transistor at 2 Watts. Hav- 
ing selected a transistor, 
you determine the relevant 
parameters from the tran- 
sistor data sheet These pa- 
rameters are the maximum 
allowable power dissipa- 
tion (Prnax), the maximum 
operating junction temper- 
ature (Tj maK ), the junction- 
to-case thermal resistance 
(©ic), and the junction-to- 
ambient thermal resistance 
(©)a)- The values you found 
are listed below. 

P md *= no Watts 

T|, max =150*C 

©|C = 12.5° C/W 
© jA = 65°C/W 

Also, you note that the 

Magazine * January, 1983 85 



item 3: maximum Junction operating tem- 
perature. 



item 4: specified thermal resistance qj C , 



Item 6: derating curves for case and am 
bieni temperatures 



MAXIMUM RATINGS 



Ritmg 



Col Iftrtor -Emitter Volia^ 



Colktcior B«! Voltage 



ErrtslTrr &mw Voltage 



Collfclor Current - CafiMtuOu* 



Bm£ Current 



Da we abo*? 2S°C 



75°C 



Tot*i Power Dnnpauoti 9 T^ 
D#raie above ?S°C 



2S°C 



per ■ting and Storage Junction 
Tflmporaturc Range 



Symbol 



v CEO 



'-'CH 



V E B 



'B 



ro 



Tj.T 



J- ' itg 



2iveo^4 



40 



40 



2M6035 

7N6Q38 



60 



60 



To" 



2NC036 
2M6039 



ec 



40- 
80- 



100 



-40- 
032 



— T.5- 
0012 



-65 to MSO 



THERMAL CHARACTER fSTlCS 



Unit 



Vdc 



VUc 



Vdc 



Adc 



*tiAdc 



A'atu 
W/°C 



Wetli 



if fern J mammum power dissipation at 
specified case temperature and derating. 
'rem 2: maximum power dissipation at 
specified ambient temperature and derat- 
ing. 



Character mi< 


Symbol 


Maw 


Unrt 


Thermal Remtance, Junction to C*te 


%C 


3.12 


Q C/W 


Thermal Remtance, Junction to Amti.wni 


fl JA 


93.3 


°cw 


*lndi»H?i JGDEC R Bartered Data 









tt&m 5. specified thermal resistance ej A . 



U t c 

* 

o 

?J0 TO 
B 

s 

£ irj io 
a a 


POWER DERATING 






\ 




































~ 




















\ Tt 


















































*^A 
























1 


i 20 40 BO 3D TOO, uo HO ISO 

T.UttPEfiATUftEfOCl 



Ffg. 6. Semiconductor thermal specifications and parameters. 



transistor is in a TO-202 
(plastic) case, !n addition to 
these specified parameters, 
you have ascertained that 
the temperature of the air 
surrounding the transistor 
will not exceed 150° F 
(65.6° C). Good design prac- 
tice suggests that you use a 
value between 10 and 20 
percent greater than your 
estimated value for this 
temperature, as a safety 
factor, which you have 
done, (A diagram of the 
thermal circuit is shown in 
Fig 4 ) 

Because your first con- 
cern is whether your transis- 
tor needs a heat sink, you 
use the value specified for 



e !A to calculate Tj as fol- 
lows: 

T, = (e, A )P + T A 
T r = (65)2 + 656 
T, = 195,6° C 
The calculated value of Tj 
is greater than the specified 
maximum operating junc- 
tion temperature (Tj m ax) by 
45.6° C 

The next step is to deter- 
mine the thermal resistance 
required of the heat sink. 
This is accomplished by 
solving the equation for e§ A 
after substituting the value 
°f Tj max for Tj, However, 
the value of one other pa- 
rameter, the case-to-sink 
thermal resistance, e^s, 
must be determined before 





Metal-to-Metal 




Insulated 


Case 










Style 


Dry 


Lubricated 


Dry 


Lubricated 


TO-3 


0,5 


0.1 


1.3 


0.36 


TO-66 


1.5 


0.5 


2-3 


OS 


TO-83 


— ■ 


ft.1 


— 


— 


T094 


— 


0.1 


— 


— 


TO- 126 


2.0 


1.3 


4.3 


3.3 


TO-127 


1,6 


0,8 


2.6 


1.8 


TO-202 


1.3 


0.9 


4,8 


2.0 


TO-220 


12 


1.0 


3.4 


1.6 



Table 7. Cas&to-sink thermal resistance in Q C/W. 

86 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



this equation can be solved. 
©CS depends upon the 
method used to mount the 
transistor It usually is pro- 
vided in a table by heat-sink 
manufacturers and, occa- 
sionally, semiconductor 
manufacturers, Table 1 lists 
values of Bq$ for some com- 
mon transistor case types 
and mounting methods. 

After obtaining a value 
of 4 8° C/W for e CSf the 
completed thermal dia- 
gram is shown in Fig 5. e$ A 
is calculated as follows; 
e SA = [(150 - 65,6)/2] - 

(12.5 + 4,8) 
e SA = 24.9° C/W 

A heat sink with a ther- 
mal resistance of 24,9° C/W 
or less will provide ade- 
quate heat transfer. A num- 
ber of small inexpensive 
heat sinks with a e 5A of 20° 
C/W for the TO-202 case 
style are available. You sim- 
ply select one which meets 
your mounting require- 
ments. 

The Semiconductor Specs 

Except for saying that 
they are found in the manu- 



facturers' data sheets, de- 
tails of how the values for 
thermal resistances are ob- 
tained have not been dis- 
cussed. Yet determining 
these values from the speci- 
fications sometimes re- 
quires sk ML Familiarity with 
the types of data most like- 
ly to appear in the data 
sheet is necessary to suc- 
cess With the aid of the 
data sheet appearing in Fig. 
6 f this data and its interpre- 
tation are described in the 
following paragraphs. 

The data sheet in Fig. 6, 
was chosen to illustrate 
common methods of speci- 
fying semiconductor ther- 
mal specifications for two 
reasons First, all of the speo 
locations are labeled clear- 
ly and are arranged into 
a single, logical area of the 
specification. This is not 
true of all semiconductor 
data sheets Often, thermal 
specifications, particularly 
for linear integrated cir- 
cuits, are placed in notes, 
(The entire data sheet 
should be read before con- 
cluding that they have been 



omitted.) The second rea- 
son for selecting the data 
sheet shown in Fig. 6 was 
that it contained all of the 
data relating to thermal 
specification. A typical 
data sheet will provide only 
a portion. 

Thermal resistance is 
specified by direct specifi- 
cation, by derating, and by 
thermal-related parame- 
ters. A manufacturer uses 
direct specification when 
he tabulates thermal resis- 
tance in data sheets, The 
designer simply inserts the 
specified values into his 
thermal equations Items 4 
and 5 of Fig 6 illustrate di- 
rect specifications. 

A derating specifies how 
quickly the maximum pow- 
er dissipation must be de- 
creased as the case or ambi- 
ent temperature increases. 
A derating may be given by 
statement (illustrated by 
items 1 and 2) or by curve 
(illustrated by item 6). A nu- 
meric value for thermal re- 
sistance is needed for the 
thermal analysis. The tech- 
nique for determining a 
number from this kind of 
specification is more easily 
explained using an exam- 
ple. 

The derating (item 1] indi- 
cates that the 2N6034 has a 
maximum power dissipa- 
tion of 40 Watts at a case 
temperature of 25° C It 
also indicates that this 
should be derated at 0.32 
W/°C above 25° C The de- 
rating is assumed to be lin- 
ear above ihv specified tem- 
perature unless otherwise 
specified. This means that 
for every degree increase in 
case temperature, the dissi- 
pated power must be de- 
creased by 0.32 Watts. 

An examination of the 
electrical thermal model in 
Fig. 2 causes us to conclude 
that the power has to be de- 
creased because junction- 
to-case thermal resistance 
is limiting heat flow from 
the device. Furthermore, 
the rate at which the power 
must be decreased as the 
temperature increases is re- 
lated to the value of this 
thermal resistance. Actual- 



ly, the rate of derating is the 
reciprocal of the thermal re- 
sistance. Thus, the junction- 
to-case thermal resistance 
for the 2N6034 can be cal- 
culated: 
e jC - 1/032 
ejc = 3/125° C/W 
The same technique can be 
applied to determine the 
junction-to-ambient ther- 
mal resistance from the de- 
rating in item 2, 

The type of thermal resis- 
tance specified is indicated 
by the location of the speci- 
fied temperature. The sub- 
script attached to the tem- 
perature symbol identifies 
this location 

Frequently, a manufac- 
turer will provide a derating 
curve, such as the one illus- 
trated in Fig. 7, which pro- 
vides the same information 
tn graphical form. The hori- 
zontal axis indicates tem- 
perature. In this curve, it is 
temperature at the case. 
The vertical axis is the maxi- 
mum dissipated power al- 
lowed at the indicated tem- 
perature. To find the ther- 
mal resistance from a derat- 
ing curve, divide the differ- 
ence in temperature by the 
difference in dissipated 
power. From Fig, 7, the tem- 
perature changes from 25° 
Cto150°Cwhfchis125°C. 
The change tn dissipated 
power over this tempera- 
ture range is from 40 Watts 
to Watts, a difference of 
40 Watts. Thus, Bjc is calcu- 
lated by dividing 1 25 by 40, 
e JC = 125/40 
e jC = 3.215° C/W 
Notice (in item 6 of Fig, 6) 
that Motorola gave a derat- 
ing curve for both case and 
ambient temperatures. 
Each curve is labeled with 
the appropriate tempera- 
ture. 

A manufacturer may not 
specify either a thermal re^ 
sistance or a derating. How- 
ever, a knowledgeable de- 
signer can determine a de- 
rating specification from 
other specifications and 
calculate the thermal resis- 
tance from this derating. 

The key to determining a 
derating curve for a semi- 



TrUPERATUftC Of 
MAXIMUM POwrEB fUTJMG 




MAXIMUM OPERATING 
TEMPERATURE JT J[B ax 



T C C*C1 



Fig. 7. Transistor power derating curve. 



conductor is to find two 
points of the curve above 
the temperature where it 
begins to slope downward. 
Among other parameters, 
the derating curve specifies 
the temperature above 
which the device can no 
longer be operated, that is, 
Tj, ma * (see Fig. 7). At this 
temperature, the power 
must be zero. This is equiv- 
alent to sayrng that the 
current must equal zero in 
the electrical thermal cir- 
cuit (Fig. 2), 

Because no current is 
flowing in the circuit, no 
temperature is dropped 
at ross either Ojc or e CA- 
Thus, the maximum operat- 
ing temperature of the de- 
vice must equal the maxi- 
mum operating ambient 
temperature and the maxi- 
mum operating case tem- 
perature. When the manu- 
facturer specifies Tj maXi 
one point on both the ambi- 
ent and the case tempera- 
ture derating curves is 
known. The second point 
on the derating curve is es- 
tablished as the tempera- 
ture where the maximum 
power dissipation is speci- 
fied, 

For example, the follow- 
ing are specified for the 
2N6034 (items 1 and 3). 
P ma *=40 Watts@T c = 

25° C 
T Jrma *=150°C 
The fact that this data 
agrees with the derating 
curve can be verified by 
comparing these two points 
on the derating curve la- 
beled Tc in Fig. 6, item 6. 
Though Motorola seems to 
specify P max as part of the 
derating specification, the 
appearance is created by 
the organization of the data 



sheet. The common prac- 
tice is to specify that pa- 
rameter, though no derat- 
ing is specified. 

Typically, the values of 
thermal resistance calculat- 
ed from the derating curve 
and from the power and 
temperature specifications 
will agree with the specified 
thermal resistances within a 
few percent. Have you cal- 
culated Oj A by the above 
methods to find how close- 
ly they agree to its specified 
value? 

As a designer searches 

for thermal specifications, 
he will discover that either 
ej A or ejc, but not both, is 
specified for a number of 
devices. Also, these specifi- 
cations will be void of data 
which allows calculation of 
the unspecified value, This 
is true because manufactur- 
ers specify the parameters 
they believe relevant to the 
use of the device being 
specified, as they under- 
stand its application. In this 
regard, a device may fall in- 
to one of three categories. 

It may have a specific 
function and the designer is 
not expected to concern 
himself directly with the 
power dissipation versus 
temperature relationship 
For example, an SIN7400 
TTL quad NAND logic gate 
has a specific function, In 
this case, the manufacturer 
specifies the maximum 
temperature of operation 
for the device. The designer 
is expected to limit the am- 
bient temperature to a 
value such that the speci- 
fied value is not exceeded. 

A device may be designed 
for use with or without a 
heat sink. These devices, 

73 Magazine • January, 1983 87 



AT LAST! 

This service will be available nationally. Lab tested & time proven 
modifications professional ty installed rn your amateur Handy-Talkie 2M P 
220, 440, MH2 transceiver by Henry Radios warranty technicians 

(KNOWN AS "A&W PRODUCTIONS") 




HAVE ALL PL TONES AVAILABLE AT YOUR FINGER TIPS 



Outboard 1 he dip switch! Have II welly inlayed 
into the back cover of your H cindy- Talkua making 
all 33 PL Tones Selectable al a moment's 
notice 

$25 Got your own PL? Send It Id ub with your 
Handy Talkie unit and we do the professional 
Installation for you. 

$BS We will Install a now PL and Inlay the dip 
switch Into the back cover of your Handy-Talkie 
ready to operate. 

Sand us your Handy- Talkie unit and a check or 
money order plus £3.50 for shipping, and hand- 
ling payable to AAW PRODUCTIONS. INC- 



For TEMPO units the dip switch is Inlayed into 
Ihe Puah-to-Talk bar The TEMPO 5-15 will 
have Ihe dip switch iniayeO into the back cover 

MS We Will install a N EW B ATTE H Y B E AT E R 
In your TEMPO 5-1,3-2.3-4, S-5 READV to 
operate. Your Mew Battery Beater will use Ihe 

same lack aa Ihe charger with np new holes and 
regulation circuits built into unit. Comes with 
Cigar Lighter Adapter with intemoi fuse 

CONTACT AaW PRODUCTIONS FOft SPE- 
CIAL MODIFICATIONS YOU MAY WANT 
TO HAVE DONE. WE SPECIALIZE 1N THE 
TEMPO HANDY-TALKIES. 



WE ARE AN OFFICIAL "TEJUFOT REPAfl STATION 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED FOR 30 DATS. SEND YOUR HANDY TALKIE AND A CHECK OR UQHEY 



ORDER TO 



AN 



PRODUCTIONS 



p*16* 



3 305 Pico &t*d.. Smnut Monica 
California 904Q5 (2 S3} 8&-Q3 10 



L 



being rated between 0.25 
and 5 Watts dissipation 
without a heat sink, usually 
are classified as small or in- 
termediate power devices. 
An example is the 2N6034 
Darlington used in the 
above examples. Both e (A 
and Big are specified for 
these devices. 

Lastly, a device may be 
classified for use only with 
a heat sink. These are the 
high-power devices, such as 
the 2N3055. The data man- 
uals commonly provide on- 
ly the data required to de- 
termine the heat-sink re- 
quirements. 



The Heat -Sink Specs 

Values of thermal resis- 
tance for heat sinks are 
more easily determined 
from data sheets than are 
those for semiconductors. 
Thermal resistance for a 
heat sink can be provided 
by either of two methods. 
The first is by direct state- 
ment, as in the case of semi- 
conductors The second 
method is by curve, as illus- 
trated in Fig. 8, The horizon- 
tal axis is heat as power dis- 
sipated. The vertical axis 
shows the temperature dif- 
ference between the heat 
sink and ambient caused by 



100 


*_ eo 



4D 



■? 20 























_i 




^^ 






^ 




1 







2 y 

DISSIPATED POWfft t WATTS) 



Fig. & Heat-sink thermal rating curve, 

73 Magazine • January, 1983 



the heat flow. To find the 
thermal resistance, simply 
find the temperature differ- 
ence caused by the heat 
flowing in your thermal cir- 
cuit. Then, divide the tem- 
perature difference by that 
power 

In the example where we 
calculated e$A, the audio 
output transistor dissipated 
2 Watts. The curve in Fig. 8 
shows a temperature differ- 
ence of 40° C at a 2 -Watt 
power dissipation. Thus, the 
thermal resistance is: 

e SA = 40/2 
e SA = 20° C/W 

Sometimes, the thermal re- 
sistance curve is nonlinear, 
meaning that e$ A changes 
as the dissipated power in- 
creases. Thus, il will not be a 
straight line, as shown in Fig. 
8. Usually, it is straight. In 
either case, ihis technique 
determines 9sa easily. 

All manufacturers pro- 
vide curves with essentially 
the same data. The only dif- 
ference is the axis labeling. 
For example, IERC labels 
the vertical axis on some of 
their data sheets "max- 
imum sink temperature rise 
above ambient (°C)." To 
avoid confusion, simply 
remember the thermal 
equivalent of Ohm's Law: A 
temperature difference is 
caused by heat flowing 
through a thermal resis- 
tance. 

One other factor must be 
considered during heat-sink 
selection. The thermal resis- 
tance of a heat sink is speci- 
fied for a specific physical 
orientation of the heat sink. 
(This is true of semiconduc- 
tors, also.) Except for heat 
sinks which are designed 
for special applications, the 
manufacturer specifies the 
resistance for maximum un- 
obstructed natural convec- 
tion. To understand the 
meaning of this, recall that 
natural convection depends 
upon heated air rising to be 
replaced by cooler air, A 
heat sink operates properly 
when air can circulate free- 
ly across the maximum area 
of every fin. This means 
that it should be mounted 



with its fins vertical. Also, 
the ends should be kept 
clear to allow unobstructed 
entry of air between the fins 
at the bottom and exit from 
the top. Your mounting con- 
straints should always he 
considered during heat-sink 
selection. 

Summary 

The principles involved 
in heat-sink selection are 
now complete. The thermal 
circuit and its electrical 
equivalent provide a theo- 
retical model for easy anal 
ysis of thermal phenomena 
Thermal resistances for an 
equivalent circuit are deter 
mined from the manufac- 
turers' data sheets. Applied 
to the thermal circuit, 
Ohm's Law and Kirchoff's 
Voltage Law, which are un- 
derstood by those who 
work with electrical cir- 
cuits, allow calculation of 
the semiconductor junction 
temperature The calculat- 
ed temperature is com- 
pared to the maximum tem- 
perature specified by the 
manufacturer to determine 
the necessity of a heat sink 
1 1 a heat sink is required, the 
maximum semiconductor 
temperature is substituted 
into the equations to deter- 
mine the maximum thermal 
resistance for a heat sink 
which will limit the junction 
temperature to a safe val- 
ue. 

Two criteria are used to se- 
lect a heat sink Its thermal 
resistance must be less than 
the calculated maximum val- 
ue and its mounting must be 
consistent with the design- 
er's application. Heat-sink 
selection using these criteria 
completes the process, 

Acknowledgements 

The semiconductor data 
contained in Fig. 6 was re- 
produced from page 4-195 
of the Power Device Data 
Manual, 1st Edition, copy- 
right 1978 by Motorola 
Semiconductor Products. 
Inc., Phoenix, Arizona. Per* 
mission to print this portion 
of the manual was provided 
by Motorola. ■ 



SELECT YOUR 
FAVORITE FEATURE 




IE 






Yes, the CT2100 has the features you want - and built-in, too! The CT2100 has been designed 
by the RTTY people at HAL for optimum operator convenience. No "hidden" keyboard con- 
trols to remember — it's all on the front panel, arranged for serious operators. Why settle for a 
compromise or imitation when you can have the CT2100? Compare feature for feature; you'll 
find that the CT2100 offers the most performance and flexibility for your dollar, 

• Send or receive ASCII, Baudot, or Morse code 

• RTTY and Morse demodulators are built-in 

• RTTY speeds of 45, 50, 74, 100, 110, 300, 600, and 1200 baud - 
ASCII or Baudot 

• Four RTTY modems: "high tones", low tones", 
**103 Modem tones", and "202 Modem tones" 

• Three shifts for high and low tones (170, 425, and 850 Hz) 

• Crystal -synthesized transmit tones 

• Send and receive Morse code at 1 to 100 wpm 
Characters displayed on 24 line screen 

• Choose either 36 or 72 characters per line 

• 2 pages of 72 character tines or 4 pages of 36 character lines 

• Split-screen for pretyping transmit text 

• Audio, current loop, or RS232 data I/O 

• Printers available for hard-copy of all 3 codes 

• On-screen RTTY tuning bar plus LED indicators 

• ALL ASCII control characters; half or full duplex 

• Brag-tape storage of 8-256 character messages in 
MSG2100 EPROM option 

• Two programmable HERE IS messages 

Write or call for more details. See the CT2100, KB2100, Printer, and Video Monitor at your 
favorite HAL dealer* 



HAL COMMUNICATIONS CORP. 




BOX 365 

URBANA, ILLINOIS 61801 



217-367-7373 



345 



GEAR FOR 
THE EARS 



SWR Gk Power 

Meter 



TS- 

Filters 

YK 88A^1 . . • . S59.95 

YK-88C-1 _.,..„. . .69.95 

YG-455C-1 89.95 

YG-455CN-1....,.,. .107.95 

nv^*iu * * »*«.* + * y^yb 

MC-60 69.95 

TR-5 
IC-740 

EX 241 (Marker) ,$20.00 

EX 242 <FM unit) ..., 39.00 

EX 243 (Elec. keyer ) , « 50.00 

FL44 i^Qnn 

f h^w ■ ■ ■<■ -TTP«w««*«,d » » a *'■.'. - h >. * p. « v7-vV 

FL52 <45S kHz, 500 HzCW filter) . .TBA 
FL53 (455 kHz, 250 HzCW filter) 
FL54 (9mHz, 270 Hz, CW filter) 
SP4, 24.95 

*» "** ■ ■ ■ ■■■■»»***■***■ *"»•»**'» j ■ " %? _ JnJ 

FT-102 

FV102OM . , , , $295.95 

XF8 .9KC 600 Hz 8-pole CW 

CW filter 50.00 

XF8.9 KCN 300 Hz 8- pole 

CW filler 50.00 

XF8.9KA 6 KHz 8-pole AM filter.. 50.00 
XF107KC 800 Hz 6-pofe 3rd 

IF CW filter 45.00 

RAM Unit Memory back-up 

board , . , 20 00 

KY-ONE Curtis 8044 keyer unit ,45,00 

DC cable for FT-ONE 15.00 

FM-ONE FM unit ,.,,., 59.00 

YM -34 Desk microphone .,,...31.00 
YM-35 Scan noise canx mobile 

fine ••»*»»»»>«., 2000 

YM-36 Noise canx mobile mic . . 20.00 
YM-37 Mobile microphone ..,,, 10.00 
YM-38 Scan desk microphone .3900 

MD-1B8 Desk microphone 69.00 

MH-188 Mobile microphone . . .20.00 
SP-901P Speaker/patch 7600 



MASTERCARD VISA 

Ail prtett Jab Housion excepi wnets indicated Prices 
sLib|**n tp change wnhouT nottce, all uemsgutiranieeil 
Sonne 1 1 urns stibjtci prior sale Tpxas residems arid tax 
Please add suftrciem postage balance collect 



Electronics Supply 

1508 McKinney 

Houston, Texas 77010 

713-658-0268 



90 73 Magazine • January, 1983 




The most advanced 
automatic computing RF 
measuring instrument in 
amateur radio. 

Logarithmic SWR scale. 

9 Power ranges 20/200/2000 
watts. 

• Frequency range 1-30 
MHz. 

Automatic. No "set" or "sensitivity" 
control. Computer sets full scale 
so SWR reading is always right. 
Complete hands-off operation. 

Light bar display. Gives instant 
response so you can see SSB power 
peaks. Much faster than old -fashioned 
panel meters Baton switch selects 
three power ranges. 

Logarithmic SWR display. Computer 
expands the display where you need 
it so it's easier to see, easy to use 

Computer operated. Now an 

analog computing circuit and digital 
comparator automatically compute 
SWR regardless of power level. Frees 
you from checking zero, setting a 
"sensitivity" knob and from squinting 
at old-fashioned cross pointer 
mechanical meters. With this new 
meter computing is done electronically 
and displayed with moving light bars. 
Individual bars for SWR and power. 

Model M-827 Automatic SWR & 
Power Meter $1 19.95 in the U.S. and 
Canada Add $3 shipping 'handling 
California residents add sales tax. 





ORDER YOURS NOW! 

Send for FREE catalog describing 
the SWR & Power Meter and our 
complete line of Noise Bridges, Pre- 
amplifiers, Toroids, Baluns, Tuners, 
VLF Converters, Loop Antennas and 
Keyer s. 



Palomar 
Engineers 

1924-F West Mission Rd. 
Escondido, CA 92025 
Phone; (619) 747-3343 



DISPLAY 
YOUR 

STUFF 



■ 



With the AEA MBA^RO Reader 



Automatic display of trans- 
mitted and received Morse 
and RTTY coded signals has 
come of age. It is proving to 
be most worthwhile for im- 
proving one's own transmit- 
ted "fist" and for allowing 
SWUs or visitors the oppor- 
tunity to experience the thrill 
of Amateur Radio coded 
transmission. 




While no machine can yet 
match the ability of a skilled 
CW operator in copying poor 
fists or signals buried in the 
noise, the MBA-RO by AEA 
excel Is even when compared 
against units costing much 
more. The large 32 character 
display allows much easier 
reading than shorter displays, 
especially at higher speeds 
such as 60 WPM or 100 WPM 
RTTY. The MBA-RO also fea- 
tures dual filters for RTTY 
decoding of either 170 Hz or 
425 Hz (easily changed to 850 
Hz) shift transmissions, 

For more details, write for our latest 
catalog or visit your favorite dealer, 

Prices and Specifications subject to 

change without notice or obligation. 

Software ? copyright by AEA. 

ADVANCED ELECTRONIC 
APPLICATIONS, INC. A 

P.O. Box C2160, 
Lynn wood, WA 98036 
(206) 775-7373 
Telex: 152571 AEA INTL 



AEA 



Brings you tto 





American made RF Am. 
off exceptional Value an 



RF 




•5 year warranty * prompt U.S. service and assistance 



LIFIERS 



$89.95 



2 METERS-ALL MODE 

B23 3Win-30Wout 

(useable in: 100 mW-5W) 

Bids 10W in*80W out / $179.95 

( 1 W = 1 5 W. 2W = 30 W) R }i preamp 

,016 10Win = 160Woi $279.95 
{•1W=35W, 2W=90W) m preamp 

B3016 30W in = 160W Jut $239.95 
(useable in: 15-45W) RX preamp 




lifiers and WattVSWR 
performance. 




z ALL MODE 

Win=60Wout $199.95 
2W=30W) RX priamp 

10W in * 120W out 9289.95 
W, 5W*90W)RXprfeamp 

in = 20Wout $89.95 

(useable in: 200mW-5W) 






Available 



Mnmimm 



RC-l AMPLIFIER 

REMOTE CONTROL $24.95 

Duplicates all switches, 18' cab 

a, J.I defers througho*. the wor.d. 



/ SWR METERS 

• peah or average reading 

• direct SWR reading 
MP-1 (HF) 1.8-30 MHz 
MP-2 (\3tHF) 50-200 MHz 

\ $119.91 

430-450 MHz ALL MODE 

D24 2W in\=40W out $199.95 
( 1 /zW = 24W\lW = 70W) 

D1010 10W\in = 100W out 
(2W=25W) \ $319.95 




P.O Box 1393, Gilroy.lCA 95020 



\ 




847-1857 



COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT.INC. 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 91 



Calvin McCarthy VE7DOD 
Box 1 333 
Princeton B.C. 
Canada VOX 1 WO 



Your January 
Home-Brew Project 

No frills— just a solid $10 SSB exciter for HF. 
Who says hams don't build anymore? 



Promises, promises How 
can any SSB exciter be 
inexpensive when an i-f fil- 
ter is needed? I have been 
regaled with plans for inex- 
pensive SSB generators, but 
the operative paragraph 
usually describes how the 
filter was found deep in the 



m 



INPUT 






22K 



bowels of the faithful junk 
box or bought for a song 
from an unsuspecting entre- 
preneur at the last flea mar- 
ket. I have always arrived 
just as the last treasure has 
been sold. The promise of 
an inexpensive exciter elud- 
ed me 



-° — lit — ? — fit — t 

-~co JLct 

8.2*F ^S9*f 



Hlh 



■ C2 



m 



% 



Ci JLco 



3W 



m 



OI^F 

4h 



OUTPUT 



a ?*f 



fff 



t 2K 



Fig. 1 t A 3,58-MHi crystal-lattice SSB tt fitter with an audio 
bandwidth of 2 kHz and 2.2k input and output impedance. 



So what am 1 offering 

you? Another inexpensive 
SSB exciter. This time the 
operative paragraphs will 
describe how you can make 
a very satisfactory crystal 
if filter for less than $10.00 
which needs no critical tun- 
ing or messy and unpredict- 
able crystal grinding. I will 
then describe how I used it 
in a 15-meter exciter. 

This simple filter is made 
using four of the ubiquitous 
3.58-MHz television crys- 
tals in a ladder configura- 



tion as shown in Fig. 1. If all 
you want is a simple if 
fitter, this could be built as 
described by the schematic 
and you would be pleasant- 
ly impressed by its perfor- 
mance. For those who are 
innovators and have other 
crystals which are the same 
in frequency, there are 
general design rules for 
making two-, three-, and 
four-crystal filters. Fig. 2 
gives the normalized ca- 
pacitance values for these. 
To find the actual value of 




The prototype 15-meter SSB exciter. 
92 73 Magazine • January ,1 983 




The exciter displaying the crystal filter mounted in a 
mtnibox for shielding. 



It 



t m ^ 

-Leo — - 



I 



CO 
4l4Z 



ft? 






CI 
182 



fc 

-llh 



rft 



»c 



1?V 



••"T; 



/*> 



1c 

HB- 



fc 



CO 
707 



■** 



■CI 
2 12* 



I 



■CI 
I 82 

4142 

ft, 



tc 

Hlh 



Ci 



CO- 



* 



/» 



re 



tz 



:^co 



/7> 



lh 



2 



ftt 



i 
ft* 



Fig. 2- To find the actual 
value of the shunt capaci- 
tors, multiply the coeffi- 
cient beside each capacitor 
by V[2nfR), where f is the 

crystal frequency and R is 
the filter design impedance. 

each capacitor, the coeffi- 
cient beside each capacitor 
must be multiplied by 

1/(2nfR) where f is the reso- 
nant frequency of the 
crystals in Hertz and R is 
the design input and output 
impedance in Ohms. For the 
suggested filter using the 
3,58-MHz crystals, R was 
chosen to be 2.2k Ohms — 
thus 1/(2 rrfR) - 20pF. C„ = 
.4142 X 20 pF s= 8.284 pF 
= 8,2 pF; C, as 1,82 X 20 
pF = 36.40 pF = 39 pF; C 2 
= 2.828 X 20 pF = 5656 
pF = 56 pF. 

If the impedance was 
chosen to be 1.8k Ohms, 
then C = 10 pF, C, = 47 
pF, and C 2 = 68 pF> Thus, 
the impedance which is 
chosen to work toward is 
flexible, but there are a few 
considerations to notice- As 
the impedance is lowered, 
the pass band of the filter is 
reduced and the insertion 
loss will increase. On the 
other hand, as the im- 
pedance is increased, the 
passband widens but the 
ripple in the passband also 
increases. As well, the low 
capacitance values for 
higher impedances make 
stray capacitance more 
troublesome. 

This technique has been 
used by others to make 



J2K 



m 



■ OjtF 
29V 



ffl 



I 5EK 



! *P 



(Q™™ 



25,* F 



3000. 

dynamic 

microphone 



5 



620 



filters using surplus crystals 
in the 8-to-1 2-MHz ranges 
as well It was stated that a 
design impedance of 800 to 
1000 Ohms was usable at 
that frequency for an SSB 
filter. A design impedance 
of 1 500 Ohms was usable at 
5 MHz. 

In putting this filter into a 
circuit, it is imperative that 
it be properly terminated in 
its design impedance, both 
on the input and output. 
Neglecting this can give a 
very high passband ripple. 

Now, you may think, we 
have the filter, but there is 
always a need for carrier-os- 
cillator crystals. Good 
news! The series resonant 
frequency of the crystals 
controls the lower limit of 
the passband, so one more 
crystal identical to those 
used in the crystal filter 
will allow selection of the 
upper sideband. How easy 
can it be? 

Listening to OSCAR 8, 
mode A has whet my appe- 
tite for a taste of operating 
through this satellite. One 
constraint seems to be that 
one should have full-duplex 
capabilities for the most 
success, but I had no VHF 
equipment and only one HF 
transceiver I built a simple 
transmitting converter with 
five Watts output on 2 
meters for one-milliwatt in- 
put on 15 meters. This gave 



i* 



25- * 
25V 



i 



ado 

FEEDBACK 



m 



2 5V 



© 



2*2307 



56K 



IK 
VOLUME 



10^ 




PIN ! 
* BALANCED 
MOOULAtOH 



5 bH 



Fig. 3. Microphone amplifier. 



33ji H 



*ff~ p* y 




*(2V 

J 



-> BALANCED 
MODULATOR 

PIN 10 



Ulpf 



B20pF 



Fig. 4 + Carrier oscillator. All resistors are V* Watt LI could 
be Miller part 46A225CPC with a 4-turn secondary added, 
available from Radiokit Box 411 H, Greenville NH 03048, 



me VHF capability. I first 
proposed to excite this with 
a CW signal; then the idea 
of a DSB exciter was enter- 
tained before I discovered 
the inexpensive crystal 
filter just described. I then 
could proceed with a full 
SSB exciter with an output 
power of one milliwatt on 
15 meters, The design phi- 
losophy was very simple — I 
used the parts I had easily 
available to build a basic 
transmitter without bells 
and whistles. This was done 
and I am happy with the 
results. 

Microphone Amplifier 

The microphone amplifi- 
er described in Fig. 3 must 
match a low-impedance 
dynamic microphone to a 



low-impedance, balanced- 
modulator input while in- 
creasing the microphone 
output of 2 mV to one volt 
The first stage is a common 
base amplifier to take ad- 
vantage of the low input im- 
pedance and high voltage 
gain of this configuration. 

This directly drives a com- 
mon emitter amplifier with 
adjustable feedback in the 
emitter to control the gain 
of this stage. The output 
stage is the common 741 
operational amplifier, used 
tor its very low output im- 
pedance which easily drives 
the 100-Ohm audio input of 
the balanced modulator If 
you have other micro- 
phones, you will need dif- 
ferent amplifier circuits 
than this. Just remember to 

73 Magazine * January, 1983 93 



use a low-impedance out 
put circuit to successful- 
ly drive the balanced 
modulator 

Carrier Oscillator 

The crystal-controlled 
Colpitis oscillator (Fig. 4) 
was chosen as the carrier 
oscillator because it is very 
easy to get operating and 
the crystal vibrates in its 
series resonant mode. The 
output is terminated in a 
10OOhm variable resistor 



which allows for the adjust- 
ment of the carrier level for 
best carrier suppression 
in the balanced modulator 
Inductor LI was found 
in a Poly Paks assortment 
and a four-turn secondary 
was added. Miller part 
46A225CPC also could be 
used for L1. 

Balanced Modulator 

This is the popular 



MC1496 double-balanced 
modulator which, when 
built with reasonable care, 
works very well (see Fig, 5)- 
The first one was built on 
the same PC board as the 
crystal filter, but the result- 
ing 30-dB carrier suppres- 
sion was disappointing, 
With proper shielding of the 
carrier oscillator and crys- 
tal filter, this suppression 
was increased to a usable 



AUDIO INPUT 
FROM MIC 
AMPUFlEfl 




TO INPUT 
> CRYSTAL FILTER, 
FIG I 



JT? 



Fig. 5. Balanced modulator, All resistors are X A Watt T2: 42 uH; primary— 15(^2^ 91 turns 
c-f bifilar wound #34; secondary — 30 turns wound over primary. 



.OIpF 



/tr 



MPFI02 



INPUT FROM , 
CRYSTAL > 

FILTER 

FIGURE I 



fh 



coon 



QipF 

■Jh- 



^ 



fh rtr 



ID 



/h 



Ol*F 



ft? 



KEYED 
• 12V 



TL442 



:.Oi F F 



r * 



is 



iOtf 



if 



91 pF 



•■'••■ !>>pl" 



ft* 



taH 



CT 



v T0 

-> LINEAR 
AMP 



.OJmF 



ftJ 



A IHHHe 

FHOil VFO 
OUTPUT 



Fig. 6. Carrier mixer. 



VFO 
«NPUT 



<M2V 



MPFI02 



FNOli 
0/P 



1& 



*h 



5 2<i. 



m 



•»■ 



KJOQ 



iiKU 



920 a 



*t2V 



Ol^F 



oui- 



47 Q 



I2KD 



* <l 



ZtZ 0«*iF 



500 fl I 



m 



lOty H^ 



lOG^H 



ID 



* * 



on 



50* 

CARRIER 

tttJLL 



lOOfl 



T 



* * 



JO* 



ffr 



MC 149-6 



Tn 



I £ 



^ps9lflF 



7|iM TO 
I 3«N VARIABLE 

INDUCTOft 



-p^9lpF 
X 



CT<[ 



I 



-^TG PA 



m a 
-w* — 



J 



: looo 



F/g. 7. Carrier mixer using the MC1496 double-balanced mixer. 

94 IB Magazine • January! 19B3 



50 dB. The balanced-modu- 
lator output is greater than 
is needed by the carrier mix- 
er and also greater than can 
be passed by the filter. With 
this in mind and having a 
need tor a resistive input-fil- 
ter termination, the bal- 
anced modulator is output 
into a resistive pad, the 
value of which is chosen to 
give maximum linear con- 
version mixer output with- 
out limiting while retain- 
ing maximum carrier sup- 
pression. 

Carrier Mixer 

The 3. 58-MHz single- 
sideband output of the crys- 
tal filter must be converted 
to the desired 21.5-MHz 

band to be usable. In order 
to properly terminate the 
filter and provide im- 
pedance conversion, an 
FET buffer amplifier is in- 
cluded which drives the 
600-Ohm input of the TL442 
balanced mixer (Fig. 6). This 
integrated circuit was cho- 
sen as it uses few biasing 
components and has good 
carrier suppression without 
balancing controls. If de- 
sired, the MC1496 could be 
used with equally good re- 
sults if the TL442 is hard to 
find. 

With this situation in 
mind, a carrier- mixer was 
built using the easily found 
MC1496 double-balanced 
mixer. I had good success 
with it as well This mixer 
circuit, shown in Fig. 7, is 
almost identical to the bal- 
anced modulator. R1 H be- 
tween pins 2 and 3, was 
made variable, enabling me 
to set the gain of the stage 
and thus control the drive 
to my transmitting convert- 
er. The output was made 
single-ended instead of 
balanced, so I could use the 
same tuned circuit as was 
used for the TL442 mixer 
The input drive circuit was 
made a source follower to 
properly match the lower 
input impedance of the new 
circuit The SSB drive level 
into the mixer is adjusted so 
that the maximum input 
does not cause the output 



ft? 



KEtCO 



9ipF 



INPUT FROM 
CENTH£ TAP 
Of CARRIER V 
MIXER 

INDUCTOR 



270pf 



* 



-)h 



I^H 



TRAP T LINED 
TO I4MH, 



|i 



OI M f 



4.7K 



4TpF 



2 i* 



iOpF 



'f H 



■*h 



4TpF 



IN 



fh 




2«5"T9 



/W 



1 



OUTPUT 



ALL RESISTORS 1/4 WATT 



lOOli tir620pF 



/A 



Fig. 8. Linear amplifier 



1N4739 I=r b 2uF 
6V 




I5K 



220^ 
i/2W 

■wv— 



53* H 



1 

I 



+ I2V 



ISO H f 
2SV 



-Tv OlmF 



m 



^T20Cj»F 



^F 



*7pF 



I8MH1 VFQ 
-> 04JTPMT TO 
CARRIER 

MIXER 



3.3Kii 

I — *\AAr 



I 



.DI*F 



, s 


: 




r - 

i 1 









4 T0 IJ J^ i0l(1 p 



/77 



/T* 




fig. 9. Vfo, LI: 23 turns of if 22 enameled wire close-wound on 3/8"-diameter ceramic form. 
77: Primary— 25 turns §34 enameled wire on Amidon toroid T25-6; secondary — 28 turns 

center-tapped #34 enameled wire wound over primary. 



to limit The output is ad- 
justed by R1 to properly 
drive the PA stage, and the 
carrier null potentiometer 
is adjusted for minimum 
vfo output. Usually it will 
be sufficient, in this service, 
to set the null pot at its mid- 
point. Carrier suppression is 
less critical here than in the 
balanced modulator. 



Linear Amplifier 

The linear amplifier (Fig. 
6) supplies about 1 milli- 
watt output sufficient to 
drive my transmitting con- 
verter to full output. An in- 
put series trap tuned to 14 
MHz was included to re- 
duce the level of the unde- 
sired mixer product (proba- 
bly an unnecessary frill but 
having the parts, it was easy 
to include). If greater out 
put is desired, the collector- 
base negative feedback 



WICBOPHQNE 
AMPLIFIER 




3.36 

MH, 




_] 










BALANCED 
MODULATOR 




CHYSTrti 
FILTER 


CARRIER 
MIXF.R 








~ 








tfiMH( 


CARRIER 

OSCILLATOR 




VFO 



MM; 



LINEAR 
AMPLIFIER 



M»I 



1 rtiW 



Fig. 70 Block diagram of exciter. 



could be reduced or more 
stages of amplification in- 
cluded. 

Vfo 

The variable frequency 
oscillator (Fig. 9) is the 
series-tuned Colpitts or 
Clapp oscillator driving a 
push-push doubler to pro- 



vide an 18-MHz carrier for 
the conversion mixer. The 
doubler is made with a 
CA3028 differential ampli- 
fier with its outputs in 
parallel. 

Building Ideas 

This exciter was built in 
the modular configuration 



which allowed for engineer- 
ing changes at a whim (also 
called mistake rectifica- 
tion), and many ideas were 
tried as I went along. All cir- 
cuits were put on printed 
circuit boards as this makes 
for neat construction. The 
vfo and carrier oscillator 
are on single-sided board 
and the others are on dou- 
ble-sided board. I also put 
the carrier oscillator and 
the crystal filter in their 
own shielded enclosures to 
reduce the carrier feed- 
through, interconnecting 
the units with RG-174 coax- 
ial cable and audio-cable 
connectors. A block dia- 
gram of my exciter is shown 
in Fig 10. 

Many parts values may 
be questioned, and I assure 
you that I would not argue 
for their absolute value. My 
choice has been controlled 
very much by availability. I 
had some 1-uH variable in- 
ductors bought from Digi- 
tal Research Corporation of 
Texas, a bag of assorted in- 
ductors and chokes from 
Poly Paks, some dipped- 
mica capacitors removed 
from surplus boards, and 
assorted resistors. 

What I had was used to 
design circuits that would 
do the job without my buy- 
ing every component as a 
special part. For example, 
bias circuits can usually be 
changed if the voftage divi- 
sion provided remains the 
same. Tuned circuits are 
flexible because resonance 
is controlled by both L and 
C and both can be changed 
to meet your needs. Ami- 
don Associates can supply 
a flyer containing a very ac- 
curate chart for winding in- 
ductors on their various to- 
roid cores if you have a par- 
ticular capacitor you want 
to use in a resonant circuit 
Bypass capacitors can be 
chosen from many values 
which will effectively pro- 
vide a short to ground for 
the signal frequency A 
command transmitter ca- 
pacitor was used to pro- 
vide vfo tuning, but any 

73 Magazine * January, 1983 95 



A Breakthrough 

for Amateur and 
Commercial Repeater Users. 

DIVERSITY RECEPTION -the ability to add a 
second receiver to your repeater system— can 
now be a reality for even the small user. The 
Pegasus VS-2 will allow your repeater to 
"listen" to two receivers simultaneously and to 
noiselessly switch between receivers as often as 
necessary to adjust for fading and nulls. This is 
particularly useful for repeaters that wish to 
provide coverage for hand held users or where 
receiver desense is a problem. You supply the 
second receiver & RF link and the VS-2 does 
the rest. Complete instructions and diagrams 
included with the VS-2, 



oo 

Postpaid 



7 4¥H* VF0 



3 saim* USfl 




a BU.HI LEB 




C ^^3 






Pegasus Electronics. Inc. 

88 New Dorp Plaza 

Suite 106 

S fa ten Island, NY 10306 

(212)667-9137 

AFfHated with Comsec Corp 




^201 



5 3MHI VFQ x 2 



3/5fl MMi US8 




JlMHc LSB 
1 4 2 tint use 



Fig. 11. Suggested conver- 
sion schemes for amateur- 
hand exciters. 

comparable variable ca- 
pacitor would do just as 
well. The transistors used 
are common, inexpensive, 
and easily substituted with 
something you may have 
on hand. 

Ideas 

This crystal filter and 
single-sideband generator 
could be used in many 
other ways (see Fig. 11). Us- 
ing a vfo frequency of 73 
MHz would give a lower 
sideband output on 75 
meters. Doubling the out- 
put of an auxiliary 5-MHz 



vfo would provide an upper 
sideband signal on 20 me- 
ters or a lower sideband 
signal on 40 meters, Many 
refinements are also possi- 
ble which would make this 
exciter more versatile, but 
even without them it is pos- 
sible to have an exciter with 
a quality single-sideband 
filter for very little. 

The following parts may 
not be listed by advertisers, 
but they usually can supply 
them: 

• MC1 496- Codbout Elec- 
tronics, lameco Electron- 

• TL442 — Active Compo- 
nent Sales Corp., Box 1035, 
Framingham MA 01701. 

• CA3028-Aldelco,B 

References 

1, J. Rochet F6BQP, "Crystal 
Ladder Fillers/' Wireless World, 
July, 1977, p. 62. 

2, Pat Hawker G3VA, "Technical 
Topics/ 1 Radio Communication, 
June, 1977, p.448, 

3, Amidon Associates, 12033 
Otsego St., N, Hollywood CA 
91607. 



WEWTS830S for $150? 



Yes indeed! Just add a Matched Pair of top- 
quality 2,1 KHz BW (bandwidth) Fox Tango 
Filters. Here are a few quotes from users; 

M . . . Makes a new fig out of my old TS830S1. , ," 

M ...V8T now works the way I dreamed it should...'" 

"..Spectacular improvement §) SSB J«/*c#Wfy,.." 

Completely eliminates my need tor a CW fitter. ■" 

"...Simple installation - amcmllent instructions..." 

The Fox Tango filters are notably superior to both 
original 2 7KHz BW units but espec*aiiy the 
modest ceramic 2nd IF; our substitutes areS-pole 
discrete-crystal construction The comparative 
FT vs Kenwood results? VBT OR 1 — RX BW: 2=0 vs 
2,4; Shape Factor: 1.19 vs 1.34; 80dBBW: 2.4Bvs 
3.41; Ultimate Rejection: 1 10dB vs 80. VBT SET 
FOR CW at 300Hz BW - SF 2.9 vs 3.33; Insertion 
Loss: 1dB vs 10dB 

AND NOW A NEW TS 930S? 
Tests prove Ihatthe same fitters improve the '930 
even more than our "830, Don't buy CW fillers— not 
even ours. You probably won 1 ! need them! 

IrslTRODUCTORY PRICE: (Complete Kil)...S150 
Includes Matched Pair of Fox Tanao Filters, 

all needed cables, parts, detailed Instructions. 

Specify kit desired: FTK-83Q or FTK*930, 
Shipping S3 (Air $5). FL Sales Tax 5% 

ONE YEAR WARRANTY 
GO FOX TANGO - TO BE SUR& 

Order by Mail or Telephone. 

AUTHORIZED EUROPEAN AGENTS 

Scandinavia MICROTEC (Norway) 

Other INGOIMPEX (West Germany) 



FOX TANGO CORPORATION 

Box 15944S, W Palm Beach, FL 33406 
Phone (305) 683-9587 ' ^353 



VlDEOSCAN IOOO - HIOH RESOLUTION SSTV 

Rivals Commercial TV 
Quality 




CODE* STAR - ALL MODE CODE READER 

More Features Per Dollar Tnan Anything Else' 





New gCfW?flt»9i amateur Standard *carr ccnvFrtflr tends and 
receive* thorp pictures with up to 16 times bener "-solution 
than earlier *nufcf . Three tcan ratei. optional call ngn and 
much mart, £«V id us* Amateur, phone Unr. TV. jurvrrilance. 
triMonleftncuvg. etc Frw"Htwr To Get Started inSSTV" 
K.t VS K S595 00 Wired VS F 4T95.00 Sh.pping S6.00 



Ideal ror novicffi/SiVLt and seasunf»H amateurs. BudlMn code 
practice raciHetQr and ipeafcer. Copier* MorK. RTTV and ASCII 
Large LECH, Easv ro connect am) operate. Automatic tpeed 
lucking. EjtceUem dMQijaifmaUm titffrfclfi 1ZVDC or 120 VAC 
with AC adapt?* provided Compact ?!l>i Connect computer 
Hike V IC- 30 \ pr mter with optional ASClt output port. 
Kit: CS-K S159 95 Wired CSF $?19 95 Shipping SS 00 
ASCII Fori Kit CS-m £59.95 Wired CS IF £79 95 



MORSE- AKEYER - CW Keyboard Kit: MAK K S1S3.9S W,r»d MAK F S,9995 Shipper £5,00 

Wisconsin reudann add 5*£ W i scent i o State Sales Tax to all ilemi. 
Call n f writ* for FREE btochurfrs. Factory Pir&cl - WERE AS NEAR AS YOUR PHONE! 



*-5fl 



7fttcnte*a£t 



Corporal io n 
P. O. Bex 513G. 



Telephone: 1414) 241 8144 
Thieniville, Wisconsin 53092 




DX~Nates Hire G*1hed Wide Acceptance *In the Aiiateur Media 

•At OAfTO* Haaventien *AT 1 across the USA »ytih 01 TOO 



SB OICC PLUS 

*SEVEM Vide M/C Coluftns 
•log Entire DX CaVHtgn 
•YQJJ Ch(}rj5e Hodes^Bands 
PLUS *Buro *3rd Party *Mora 
*Enter VQUR Atlas Page I 
*CQ Zone *IARU Continent 
•Unique "Rareness* Suide : 
'Latitude 'Longitude 
PLUS [«fo Co*puted for tfOtiB QTH: 
*TfBt Ion* Difference 
*£IACT Bei* Hejdtng 
•Miles kilometers 



DX-Koles IffvKes Coeptrtsoo \ 

'Compare Accuracy 

•Compare Efficiency I 

•Compare Useabi Hty 
*Connpar* Conveni ence 
^Compare Completeness! 



PLUS PREFIX Cro&s Reference 
l?Q0* Current p Conmema rt t I ^c 
Special Event A Historic 
i Prefixes Indexed 

: PLUS CCHJUTRr Cross Reference 
500* Ppssessltin*, Islands, 
Deleted, ETC Haves Lister! 



JARL Awards Kil 
•Highly Accltieed Uorkiheets 
»AJD 10 Call Areas 
•WAJA 47 Prefecture! 
0CC 617 Cities 
*JCG &69 Guns 
Complete With JARL Itifurmatlon 
•Loqtcal Organization 
'Efficiency Engineered 
Alphabetical Cross Reference 
•Vetera Int the JARL Cod* # 
•Available OILJ free «H6«C 
•M00 Entries Lilted 
PLUS FBEE loans 

••3Q75 US Counties Listing 



PLUS rREC Bonus **5S MAI KU ! BUY OK-Mates Just $12.9SPPd ! JARL Awards Kit Just tF^SPPd 



Send Call, Nam&, Address* Latitude, Longitude, Time Zone AND Check or Honey Order TO 



KH6HD 



Randall Sher«an 



POB I SB 



Kjhulyi , Haul . HAWAII 9673? 



^147 



96 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



Subscription. 

Problem? 



73 Magazine does not keep subscrip- 
tion records on the premises, there- 
fore calling us only adds time and 
doesn't solve the problem. 

Please send a description of the 
problem and your most recent ad- 
dress label to: 



73 Magazine 
Subscription Dept 
PO Box 931 

Farmingdale, NY 11737 



Thank you and enjoy your subscription 



this publication 

is available in 
microform 




mE^L 





University Microfilms International 



300 North Zeeb Road 

Dept. PR 

Ann Arbor, MI4A1Q6 

USA 



18 Bed lord Row 
Dept P R. 
London, WC1R4EJ 
England 



PRESERVE 



75 




P 



BINDERS & 
FILE CASES 

Keep your issues of 72 Magazine togetftef, handy 
and protected m handsome and durable library INes 
of binders Bolh sly Fes bound m red leal here! te *»tri 
the magazine logo stamped »n goto 
Files. Each file hotds 12 issues, spines visible 

fcrf easy reference. $5.95 each. 3 lor Si 7.00, 

6 lor $30 0C 
Binders. Each binder holds 12 issues and opens 

Hat tot easy reading. $750 each, 3 lot $2t 75, 

6fO*S4£Q0 
(Postage paid m USA. Foreton otdefs include 12 50 
per item) 

Please stare years 1977 to 1983 
Send check or money order to 
JESSE JONES SOX COHP 
P.O. Box 5120 
Philadelphia, PA 19 m 
Allow 4 to 6 weeks tor delivery 



Guide To RTTY 
Frequencies 



/ 



2*tt 



^r? 



***** 



i ****, 



■ 



-. 



100% totally NEW edition comprising de- 
tails on 5500 frequencies and stations. 
The original and ONLY authoritative lis! 
of most shortwave commercial, military. 
press, aeronautical, embassy and 
weather broadcasting RTTY stations. 
Complete worldwide details on shift, 
speed, power, location . schedules* press 
station beam headings, formats, special 
IDs, etc. Independent lists by frequency 
and eailsigns- Officiaf schedules of press 
stations. Introductory text reveals what's 
happening in commercial RTTY t how to 
recognize Russian, Cyrillic and Arabic 
transmissions. Other special features in 
this 2nd Edition — 176 pages — available 
late December 

In USA: $9.95, Book Mail, or $12.00. UPS 

Outside USA: US$11.00, Book Mail 

Outside USA: US$15.00, Airmail 

GILFER SHORTWAVE 

Dept- #731 , Bo* 239, Park Ridge NJ 076S6 ^/ 



pnmw 



If you need 



: \ 





I 



one or hundreds 





high stability 
• prompt service 
► cost savings 



Communication 

Industry 
Manne WF 
Scanners 
Amateur Bands 
CB Standard 
CB Special 
Microprocessor 

Call or Write 
JAM CRYSTALS 

PO, Bqk 0601 7 

F! Myers, Ft. 33*©e*0T7 

All Pnrawft (113) 9M 



ANTENNA ♦ 

FOR 

10-15-20 METERS 



VERTICAL 

OMNI-GA1N 

HALFWAVE 
END FED 

NO RADIALS 

NO REFLECTED 
POWER 

BROADBAND 

FIXED OR 
PORTABLE 

REMOTE TUNING 

2 KW PEP 

UPS SHIPPABLE 




R3 may be the perfect 
antenna for condominiums, 
apartments, small lots or am 
limited space situation, It is a 
^reat antenna for hams who 
are concerned about neat 
appearance and maximum 
performance. 

R3*s self support! ni; radiator 
is onlY<21ft"6»4*n high x 1ft 
,304m wide at the base. 
Assembly is quick and easy 
for portable, marine, field day, 
DX-peditions, or fixed 
installations. It is complete 
with remote tuner. 

AVAILABLE THROUGH 

DEALERS WORLDWIDE 



l 



!• 



**See Ust of Advertisers on page 1 14 



CORPORATION 

THE ANTENNA COMPANY 

P.O. Box 4680 

Manchester, NH 03108 USA 
TELEX 953060 ^ iQ6 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 97 




MRKER &XNILLW/HSON'S 

PORMBLE 



TELEVISION 




WE WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD!! 

Complete Systems, Antennas, 

Receivers, LNA's & Accessories 

CALL US TODAY! 

812-238-1456 



^320 



hoosier 
electronics 



"Nation's Largest Total Communications Distributor 
P.O. BOX 3300 • TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA 47803 



., 



I 



/MODEL 
370-10 



BW 



kNTENNM 




Designed for 

APARTMENTS — MOTELS — VACATIONS 
Quick Simple Installation. Operates on Z 6, 
10, 15, 20 and 40 meters. Ail coifs supplied. 
Only 22-1/2 (riches long. Weighs less than 
2 lbs. Supplied with 10 ft. RG 58 coax and 
counter poise. Whip extends to 57 inches. 
Handles up to 300 watts. 
VSWR— 11:1 when tuned 

Write for more details and other B&W products 

BW*f R * WU11AMS0H INC. 
,10 CANAL STCEET 
BRISTOL f¥v 19Q0? ^%\ 

215-788-5581 




liWifciTiiil 




STAR VIEW MODEL 12K 
• Complete System 

•Easy to Install 

•Reasonably Priced 

•UPS Shippable 
Weight 125 Pounds 

•More than 100 
Channels Accessible 

THE STAR VIEW 12K SYSTEM KIT CONTAINS: 

• 1 2 Foot Antenna 
•Azimuth Elwation Mount 

• 24 Channel Receiver 

• 1 20° Uw Noise Amplifier 

• Feed Horn 

• Cables & Connectors 

• No Modular Included 
(May be ordered separately for $79.95) 

Available through your local Craig Star View dealer • Call or write tor information * 
Dealership inquiries welcome • Price subject to change without notice. 



H&R COMMUNICATIONS, INC* Subsidiary of Craiy Corp 
Route 3, Box 1 03G Call 800 643 0102 

Pocahontas, Arkansas 72455 *** or 501 647 2291 







Alaska 
Microwave Labs 

4335 L 5TH STREET ANCHORAGE. ALASKA 99504 
(907] 336-0340 DEPT 73 



CHIP CAPACITORS 



1 Z. 2.2, 3 3, 4 ? fi 8 10 18 21. 71 A? 100 120, 
180. 220 370, 330. 390. 470. 560. 680, 620, IK. \ 2K 
I8K IflK B2K 10K. IOC* 



GaAs FETS 



MQFMOtt NF 2 Q0B @ 4GH2 MAG I^OB 
MGF141? M flDB ft 4GHZ MAG 1*08 
T2D0 WF f 009 § 1SHZ tit- 1 208 * MAG 1406 * 
4GKZ 



COAX GQNNECT0RS 



BhC CHASSIS MOUNT SQUARE HANGfc 

UNC PLUG FOR RG 5* 

SMA CHASSIS MOUNT SQUARE FLANGE 

SMA CHASStS MOUNT PLUG SQ FLANGE 

SMA CHASSIS MOUNT 5ffllP-LlNE TAB 

SMA PLUG FOR RG-M 

SMA PLUG FOR AG tf4 

SM- #1 SEMI Rl&D 

Tt< CASSIS MOUNT SQUARE FLANGE 

TYPE N PLUS FOR RG-9rfRG4 

1 YPE N DOUBLE MALE 

TYPf N I OP 141 SBA-fti&ID 

TYPE H CHASSIS MOUNT PLUG SQUARE FLANGE 



Si. 95 
ST 95 
U 
S&5Q 

K 

»7S 
S3* 
©JS 
S3 ft 

s?rs 
shoo 

S14 0& 



SILVER PLATIN6 KIT 



Will pille Copper B*5s. Bronz* Nickel. Tm Ptwto 
Gold ana mo$1 *r.,Je m*ta< llloyl 



¥10 



V??l 1 2 7GHZ TO 3.2GHZ MIN POWER 0U1 10 Mw 
TUNJNG VOLTAGE TO 20V V« *15 VDC ft 60 MA $»{» 
Vft?T t SAMt AS V7ZT-1 BUT FREQ.1GGH7 TO 4 TXMl m DO 



EFLON CIRCUIT BOARD DBL SIDED 1 0Z 



APPROX. 3.25 * 5.0"' 010 
AFfflOX 3.25"" S.0^« .0312 
AI'HROX. 325"- 5,[T' .0635 



FEED-THRU CAPACITORS 



IO0OPF SOLDER TYPE 
470 PFS0L0EFL TYPE 



LEADLESS CERAMIC CAPACITORS 



dPf H AT 8 PM EST C10SEO BPM PST 

ORDERS ARE POSTAGE PAID 
COD - VISA - MASTEftCHARGE 



98 73 Magazine * January, 1983 




Kantronics Training Tapes, 
Books, and Diskettes 



1 
I 



Theory 

I Tapes 

I 
I 

I 
I 

I 



Designed with an instructive, interview 

siyle format. Kantronics Study Tapes are 
great supportive theory materia J for the 
latest exams 

New Novice Study Tape-Sb 95 
! New General Study Tape Set-(two) 

$11 95 

General Q & A Tape-Questions simi 
lar to those on the FCC exam with good 
possible answers by Extra -class John 
Lenahan, K0RW $6 95 

D Advanced Study Tapes* (two) $11 95 

D Extra Study Tape- $b 95 
Break the 13 WPM Barrier-by Phil 
Anderson W0XI Hints and techniques 
to break the 13 WPM barner and get 
your General license. $6 95 

D General-includes Genera] manual, Gen- 
eral Study Tape set and QSO-2 Tape 
$19 95 



I Random 
Code 



Novice Random-4 6. 8 and 10 WPM 

$5 95 

General Random- 10. 12. 14 and !6 

WPM $5,95 
G Extra Random- 16. 18. 20 and 22 

WPM $5 95 



I 
I 

I Gradient 

i 
i 



Series 



in- 



Push yourself gradually with slowly 
creasing code generated by computer lo 
exact Morse specifications. Tape tran- 
scripls included 

Novice Gradient-4 to 9 WPM $6 95 
General Gradient* 7 to 15 WPM $6 95 
" Extra Gradient- 13 lo 23 WPM $6 95 
D High-Speed Gradient- 18 to 30 WPM 
$695 



Super 
Gradient 



Combines "enhanced" code with gradual 
increases in speed for easier copying 
Transcript of the QSOs and exam included 
with each tape. 
Hi Novice Super QSO Gradient -4 lo 9 

WPM $6.95 

General Super QSO Gradient- 7 lo 

15 WPM $6,95 
O Extra Super QSO Gradient- 13 to 23 

WPM $6 95 
□ High-Speed Super QSO Gradient 

18 to 30 WPM $6 95 

QSO Tape 
Series 

Simulated "on -the air" conversations? de- 
signed for the current -style FCC tests 
Tape transcripts and fill-in t he-blank exams 
included. 

DQSO Tape-7,5. 10. 13 and 15 WPM 
$5.95 

QSO-2 Tape-another hour of QSOs at 
75. 10. 13andl5WPM$5 95 
D QSO- 13 Tape-all 13 WPM $5 95 

Super Tapes 

KantTonics Super tapes generate charac 
ters sent at higher speeds with longer 
spaces for easier copying Great for learn- 
ing code and breaking copying barriers! 
Transcripts included. 

Super 5 WPM -Instructor reaches code 
from characters lo words and sentences 
$595 
L I Super QSO-QSOs at 7.5. 10, 13 and 
15 WPM, with exam $5 95 
Super QSO 13-QSO format with en 
hanced code at 13 WPM $5 95 
Super QXX-High -speed QSOs at 25 
30. 35 and 40 WPM. with exam $5.95 



QXX Tapes 

"On-the-air" format at Extra-class speeds 

Tape transcripts included. 

HQXX Tape-20. 23 and 26 WPM with 
exam $5 95 

ZQXX-2 Tape-another hour of QSOs at 
20, 23 and 26 WPM $5.95 
Q-Signals and Short Words-Learn to 
hear groups of letters as units at high 
speed. 22, 33 and 40 WPM $5.95 

Bookshelf 

I J General -Class Amateur License 
Study Guide-By Phil Anderson. 
WJ0XI $6 50 

Computers and the Radio Amateur 
Phtl Anderson, W0X1 $18-95 

OMorse Code, Breaking the Bar- 
rier (with flashcards) by Phil 
Anderson, WEJXI $3.00 

□ FCC Amateur Radio Exams Syl- 
labi for Novice through Extra 
Class Edited by Phil Anderson, W0XI 
$2.50 

Educational 
Software 

Use your Apple 11 plus computer as the 
tool to help you upgrade. Each program is 
available on 5 V disketle. 

CW Tutorial for Apple — Computer 

generated code gives perfect practice on 
random letters and numbers, call signs, 
QSOs, and abbreviations. Operator can 
select 5 to 50 WPM. Excellent lor Novice 
to Exlra. $29.95 

Theory Diskettes for Apple — Over 
one hundred multiple choice questions 
about Amateur radio theory give great 
practice for rhe FCC exams. An explana- 
tion follows each answer giving the 
opportunity to learn. 

□ Novice Theory Diskette $19.95 
Z General Theory Diskette 19.95 
~ Advanced Theory Diskette 19 95 
D Extra Theory Diskette 1995 




I 
I 



List Titles Below 



Quantity Price 




































Total 





Name 

Address 
City 



State 



Zip 



□ Master Card 
Card No. 



D Visa I ] Check ] . Money Order 
Expiration Date 



Please include '1 shipping/ handling for single tapes, *2 for multiple 

tape orders. Please allow 2-4 weeks for delivery. All cassettes 60 

minutes. 

Address: 1202 East 23rd St. 
Phone: (913) 842-7745 Lawrence. Ks> 66044 



I 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 







King of the Pulse Generators 

One-shot or a train, TTL or CMOS, this 

generator will fit the bill It's just what 

your test bench always wanted. 






Ronald A. Miara WA.iRh 
8303 infield Court #22 
Laurel MD 20708 

This handy pulse gener- 
ator is built around two 
commonly available under- 
a-dollar ICs Both pulse 
width and repetition rate 
are continuously variable 
over six decade ranges from 
one microsecond to one 
second. Normal and in- 
verted pulse train outputs 
are available, and a one- 
shot feature allows the user 



to output a single pulse by 
depressing a front-panel 
push-button switch. The 
outputs are TTL and 5-V-dc 
CMOS compatible. 

To operate the generator, 
the desired repetition rate 
range is selected with switch 
SI. (Repetition rate is the 
time between the occur- 
rence of each pulse and is 
equal to the reciprocal of 
the frequency of the pulse 
train.) The ranges that may 
be selected by S1 are: 1 ^s f 




10 {as, 100 pis, 1 ms f 10 rns, 
and 100 ms. Variable resis- 
tor R1 is then used to tune 
the repetition rate between 



one and ten times the range 
value selected by SI, For ex- 
ample, if SI is set to 10 jjs 
and R1 is set to 1X (fully 




■— COAL - 

•oon 



CI 


47pF 


G2 


470pF 


C3 


flroOpF 


C* 


D«7*F 


C5 


ir*F 


ce 


4 W 


C7 


«7GpF 


cs 


4 700 of 


C9 


047* F 


cid 


*T»F 


tu 


4 7»F 


CIZ 


*7*F 



UO^SI 

ciotvs) 

MfliS! 
(lOfnSJ 
flQQmSI 
(US I 
HO, 5i 
tlOC 

(IO»Sl 
(I00»SI 



Pulse generator. 

100 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



Fig. 1 



counterclockwise), a pulse 
will occur every 10 jis R1 
may then be tuned up to ten 
times this value (1GX fully 
clockwise), in which case a 
pulse will be output every 
100 fis 

Pulse width is similarly set 
with S2 and R4. S2 selects 
the same range values as Si, 
and R4 is used to tune the 
pulse width from one to ten 
times the value selected by 
S1. Pulse widths with duty 
cycles up to 90% may be set 
up. (Duty cycle is defined as 
the ratio of time the pulse is 
on to the time of a complete 
cycle, times one hundred 
An ordinary square wave 
would then have a 50% du- 
ty cycle since it is on half the 
time of a complete cycle.) 

To use the pulse genera- 
tor as a one-shot, switch S3 
is closed, disabling the out- 
put pulse train. Push-button 
switch S4 is then depressed 
and released to output a sin- 
gle pulse from U2. 

Refer to the schematic 
(Fig. 1) to understand how 



the pulse generator works 
Three N AND gates in U1 are 
configured with capacitors 
CI through C6, variable re* 
sistor R1, and resistors R2 
and R3 to form a square- 
wave oscillator The fre- 
quency of this oscillator de- 
termines the repetition rate 
of the generator The re- 
sistors were chosen to pro- 
duce repetition rates in 
convenient decade ranges. 
The oscillator drives one- 
shot generator U2. Capac- 
itors C7 through CI 2, vari- 
able resistor R4 P and resis- 
tors R5 and R6 determine 
the width of the pulses out- 
put from U2. The values of 
these resistors and capaci- 
tors were also chosen to pro- 
duce pulse widths in decade 
ranges. Since the oscillator 
driving U2 causes pulses to 
be output at a periodic rate, 
the output of U2 becomes 
the output of the pulse 
generator. 

Construction of this unit 
is not critical, Short lead 
lengths and an all-metal en* 



INTERNAL 
OSCILLATOR 
CHJTPl/T. Ul PIN S 



T( 



NORMAL OUTPUT 



INVERTED OUTPUT 











CYCtE i 



C*CLE 2 



72= lOO^S 



•:--e 



-\ 



h 



j 



u 



Fig. 2. Pulse generator timing diagram. This shows a pulse 
train which has a 10-p& pulse width and a 100-^is repetition 
rate, The duty cycle is equal to 10 jis divided by 100 fjs times 
one hundred percent, which equals 10 percent. 



closure should be used to 
ensure a clean and stable 
pulse-train output U1 
(74C0O) should be CMOS, 
not TTL to ensure that the 
oscillator will work. The ac- 
curacy of the pulse width 
and repetition rate depends 
on the tolerance of the resis- 
tors and capacitors used 
and how carefully the front- 
panel multiplier controls are 
labeled (from 1X to 10X). 
Since I normally use an os- 
cilloscope to set up my 
pulse generator, I used sim- 



ple front-panel labeling and 
rely on the scope for calibra- 
tion of the pulse train Sim- 
ple front-panel labeling also 
keeps the cabinet size small 
since less space is required 
on the front paneL My unit 
is powered by four penlight 
batteries which drive a min- 
iature three-terminal +5-V- 
dc regulator IC (LM309H). 

The small size and low 
cost of this handy pulse gen- 
erator should make it a nice 
addition to any ham's 
workbench ■ 



SATELLITES 



Late September brought amateur satellite enthusiasts something 
to cheer about for a change. On the 20th, the University of Surrey 
amateur scientific satellite (UoS AT) was rescued from oblivion when 
ground controllers managed to turn its telemetry beacons off for the 
first time since April. By the time you read this, UoSAT may already 
be back in full operation. 

The trouble with UoSAT (also known as UoSAT*0SCAR9or t more 
simply, U0-9> began when both the 2-meter and 70-cm beacons were 
accidentally commanded on at the same time. The effect was to de- 
sense both receivers aboard the bird, making it impossible for 
UoSAT to "hear" instructions from the ground. Even the massive 
26-dB-gain 2-meter EME array of K1WHS proved insufficient to break 
through. 

After an enormous expenditure of time and effort, the spell was fi- 
nally broken on 70 cm when the UoSAT salvage team obtained the 
services of a little-used 150*foot dish antenna at SRI International in 
California With a gain at 70 cm of 46 dB and an erp approaching 12 
megawatts, the big dish did the trick, though not without practically 
being rebuilt by the UoSAT gang in the process, 

Fortunately, UoSAT seems none the worse for the experience. 
The satellite, which does not carry communications transponders, 
continues to send a steady stream of scientific data earth ward. In 
addition to telemetry beacons at 145.825 and 435 MHz, look for HF 
beacons at 7.05, 14.002, 21.002 T and 28.510 MHz. An on-board TV 
camera may be activated as well. 

Ever since the failure of the European Space Agency (ESA) 
Ariane rocket during its fifth flight {September B} 9 the date for the 
launch of AMSAT's Phase NIB satellite has been anyone's guess. 



The best bet is now sometime in mid-April, assuming no further 
problems arise. 

Thanks to AMSAT Satellite Report.— Jeff DeTray WB8BTH, 
73 Staff. 



Jan 



Feb 









Amateur 


Sati 


SllitQ 


Reference Orbits 










OSCAW 


. B 


RS- 


5 


RS- 


6 


RS- 


1 


RS* 


8 




Date 


UTC 


EQX 


UTC 


EQX 


CTTC 


E0X 


UTC 


EQX 


UTC 


EQX 


Dati 


— — —•IT 


= s = = ■ 

0113 97 


0041 


38 


0B08 


33 


=.= = — - 
0103 


46 


0041 


E.ME 

36 


=■ = = : 


1 


1 


2 


0110 


93 


• 036 


38 


0152 


61 


0059 


45 


0038 


37 


2 


3 


0122 


99 


0030 


33 


•136 


59 


004 9 


44 


0335 


38 


3 


4 


0127 


101 


• 025 


39 


•121 


56 


0039 


43 


0832 


39 


4 


5 


0131 


102 


• 020 


39 


•105 


54 


•030 


42 


0030 


39 


5 


6 


• 135 


103 


• 014 


39 


•050 


52 


0020 


41 


03 27 


40 


6 


7 


0140 


104 


••09 


39 


••35 


49 


0010 


40 


0024 


41 


7 


B 


0001 


?• 


0004 


39 


0019 


47 


• 001 


39 


0021 


42 


B 


9 


••06 


80 


0158 


69 


•004 


45 


0150 


63 


0818 


43 


9 


11 


0010 


02 


1153 


72 


0147 


72 


0141 


67 


0816 


44 


::■ 


11 


0014 


03 


0147 


7i 


•132 


70 


0131 


67 


0013 


44 


u 


12 


0019 


04 


0142 


70 


0116 


67 


0121 


66 


0010 


45 


12 


11 


0023 


05 


0137 


70 


•101 


65 


0112 


65 


0007 


46 


13 


14 


0029 


06 


0131 


70 


•046 


63 


0102 


64 


0004 


47 


14 


15 


0032 


97 


0126 


71 


0030 


60 


0053 


63 


0001 


48 


15 


16 


0036 


38 


0121 


71 


0015 


53 


004 3 


62 


0158 


79 


16 


17 


0041 


90 


0115 


71 


0153 


86 


0833 


61 


0156 


79 


17 


IS 


0045 


91 


0110 


71 


0143 


33 


0024 


60 


0153 


83 


18 


19 


0050 


92 


0105 


71 


0127 


01 


0014 


59 


0150 


81 


19 


20 


0054 


93 


0059 


72 


0112 


79 


0004 


59 


0147 


82 


20 


21 


0059 


94 


0054 


72 


0056 


76 


0154 


83 


0144 


93 


21 


22 


0103 


95 


0049 


72 


0041 


74 


0144 


87 


0142 


04 


22 


23 


0107 


■u. 


0043 


72 


0026 


72 


0135 


86 


0139 


84 


23 


24 


0112 


9B 


0038 


72 


001(1 


69 


0125 


85 


0136 


85 


24 


25 


0116 


99 


0033 


72 


0154 


97 


0115 


84 


0133 


36 


25 


26 


• 121 


L«0 


0027 


73 


0133 


94 


0106 


83 


0130 


37 


Z6 


27 


0125 


101 


0022 


73 


0123 


92 


0856 


32 


0127 


38 


27 


28 


0129 


102 


0017 


73 


0107 


90 


0046 


81 


0125 


BB 


28 


29 


0134 


103 


0011 


73 


00 52 


87 


0037 


31 


0122 


89 


29 


10 


013S 


104 


0006 


73 


0037 


85 


0027 


30 


0119 


9ft 


30 


31 


0143 


105 


0001 


74 


0021 


S3 


0017 


79 


0116 


91 


31 


i 1 


0004 


31 


0155 


104 


0006 


30 


0008 


7B 


0113 


92 


1 


2 


0003 


82 


• 149 


124 


0149 


108 


0157 


107 


0111 


93 


2 


3 


0013 


83 


• 144 


104 


0134 


106 


•14 8 


106 


• 108 


93 


3 


4 


0017 


34 


0139 


104 


0113 


113 


0138 


105 


• 105 


94 


4 


5 


0022 


35 


0133 


105 


0133 


111 


•128 


134 


• 102 


95 


5 


6 


0026 


86 


01 20 


105 


0C48 


99 


•119 


103 


• 059 


96 


6 


7 


0030 


33 


0123 


105 


0032 


96 


0109 


102 


0056 


97 


7 


3 


0035 


39 


0117 


105 


0017 


94 


• 059 


102 


• 054 


98 


8 


9 


0039 


90 


0112 


105 


•001 


92 


• 050 


101 


0051 


93 


9 


10 


0044 


91 


#107 


106 


014 5 


119 


0040 


100 


0048 


99 


18 


U 


0048 


92 


0101 


106 


0129 


117 


0030 


99 


0045 


100 


11 


12 


00 52 


93 


0056 


106 


0114 


114 


0021 


98 


004 2 


131 


12 


13 


0057 


94 


0051 


106 


0059 


112 


0011 


97 


0040 


102 


13 


14 


0101 


96 


0045 


106 


0043 


110 


0002 


96 


0037 


102 


14 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 101 



CONTESTS 



Robert Baker WB2GFE 
75 Windsor Dr. 
Atco NJ 08004 

ZERO DISTRICT QSO PARTY 

Starts: 2000 GMT January 8 
Ends: 0200 GMT January 10 

Organised by the Mississippi Valley Ra- 
dio Club. Stations outside ol zero district 
will work zero stations only, zeros may 
work any station. The same station may 
be worked once on each band and each 
mode However, mobile stations may be 
worked each time they change counties. 

EXCHANGE 

ft5<T) and ARRL section. Zero-district 
stations also must send county. 

FREQUENCIES: 

3560, 7060. tdOQO. 21060. 2fflm 3900. 
7270, 14300. 21370, 28570. 3725. 7T25, 
21125, and 23*25. 

SCORING 

Muitiply the number ol zercKfrstriel 
counties by the number of com acts. Zeros 
score by adding ARRL sections, zero* 

district couniies T and DXCC countries 
worked snd then multiplying by total 
contacts 

ENTRIES & AWARDS: 

Certificates will be issued to all en- 
trants who submit a log and an SASE En- 
dorsements will be given for the high 
score in each ARRL secHon, DX country, 
and Novice/Technician Class Mail logs 
by February 15th to; WdSf. 3528 W, Colum- 
bia. Davenport I A 52S04 Include an SASE 
for log forms or results 



WORLD COMMUNICATION 

YEAR 

Starts: 0001 GMT January 15 
Ends: 2400 GMT January 15 

On November 19. 1981, the United Na- 
tions General Assembly adopted a resolu- 
tion proclaiming 1&83 a "World Communi- 
cation Year: Development of Communica- 
tions Infrastructures*" The basic objec- 
tives of the WCY are; (1) to provide the op- 
portunity lor ah countries to undertake an 
in-depth review and analysis of I heir poli- 
cies qn communications development, 
and |2) to stimulate the accelerated devt? i 
opment of communications inf fast rue 
lures. The Potomac Valley Radio Club is 
sponsoring this com est in support ol the 
World Communication Yea* 

All licensed radio amateurs worldwide 
are eligible to parhcipate. There will be 
two categories: single operator and mulli- 
operator. Both categories are mixed- 
mode Only stations using one transmitter 
are eligible for an award. The same sta- 
tion may be worked once on each band. 
Telephony (including SSTV) and Tetegra- 
phy (including RTTY) emissions count as 
separate bands. No cross-emission con 
tacts are allowed. The main go recti we is to 
contact as many other amateurs as possi- 
ble, anywhere in the world, using 1.8 MH/ 
to 275 GHz, excluding the 10-. !&*, and 
24- MHz bands. 

EXCHANGE: 

All stations will send iheir ITU region 
and their iTU zone For example, the fol- 
lowing stations would send the listed ex- 
changes: DUAA. 128: W1AAA. 208 and 
JA1AAA. 345, 

SCORING: 

QSO points are 4 points per 050 oul- 

sideyour ITU region, 2 points \[ Insideycur 



( 

Jonl 


;alend/\r 

ARRL Straight Key Night 


Jan 3 


73 40-Meter Worldwide SSB Championship 


Jan 8-9 


ARRL QSO Parfy-CW 


Jan B-10 


Zero- District QSO Party 


Jan 9 


73 60-Meter Worldwide SSB Championship 


Jan 9-10 


ARRL QSO Party — Phone 


Jan 15 


World Communication Year Amateur Radio Activity 


Jan 15-16 


73 160- Meter Worldwide SSB Championship 


Jan 15-16 


Hunting Lions in the Air Contest 


Jan 15-10 


QRPCW Contest 


Jan 15-16 


ARRL VHP Sweeps tales 


Jan 22-23 


Texas QSO Party 


Jsn 22-23 


North Dakota QSO Party 


Jan 29-Feb 6 


ARRL Novice Roundup 


Feb 5-3 


New Hampshire QSO Party 


Fob 5-6 


South Carolina OSO Party 


Feb 19-20 


YL ISSB QSO Party— Phono 


Feb 19-20 


ARRL International DX Contest — CW 


Feb 26 


RTTY World Championship Contest 


Mar 5-6 


ARRL international DX Cori test— Phone 


Mar 12-11 


YL ISSB QSO Party— CW 


Apr 9-10 


CARP Commonwealth Phone Contest 


Apr 9-10 


ARRL QSO Party- CW 


Apf 16-17 


ARRL QSO Party— Phone 


Jun 11-12 


ARRi VHF QSO Party 


Jun 25-25 


ARRL Field Day 


Jul 9-10 


IARU Radlosport Championship 



The RaRa Rag 

NEWSLETTER OF THE MONTH 

Beauty is not just akin deep. At least, not in the winner ol Ihls month's newsletter 
contest. The RaRa flag, published by the Rochester Amateur Radio Association. 

The thoroughly professional look or The Rag includes typeset and printed text, 
with even margins on both sides, headlines, cutoff lines, and clean graphics. It : 
all printed in booklet format on heavy paper 

But the beauty doesn't stop there. Tne Rag'* contents go way beyond the usual 
list or upcoming events, meeting dates, and president's message, One extra 
feature of the newsletter is "Cops Corner; which keeps members posted on local 
street construction and emergency service 

For history buffs, Ihere is "Tne RaRa Rag 20 Years Ago," and to bring the reader 
up to date, the editors have Included news shorts from ttio tV5V7 Report and other 
news services. Other features include news of the club's various special Interest 
croups, a fitting forum tor what appears to be an exceptionally active club 

Congratulations to Editor Ronald Jakubowski K2FU and his staff for putting 
together a club newsletter that reads as good as it looks. 

To enter your club's newsletter in our contest, send a copy to: Editorial QttH;es. 
73. Peterborough NH 03456 



ITU region bul outside your zone, and 1 
point ii inside your ITU zone. The multi- 
plier is Iho number of ITU zones worked on 
each band. For final score, multiply the 
total QSO points for all bands by the total 
zones worked For all bands 

AWARDS 

A plaque wtll be awarded lo the high- 
sconng station of each category «singie- 
and mulli-operatoft in each of the three 
ITU regions. A certificate will be awarded 
to the high-scoring entrant ol each cate- 
gory in each ITU zone In addition, a certifi- 
cate wili be awarded to one UHF/micro- 
wave station of each ITU zone Judged to 
have displayed the most outstanding 
achievement Members ol PVRC may not 
receive awards, 

ENTRIES 

All entrants are to use a suitable log 
form and summary sheet ol their choice 
Logs should include times in GMT, bands, 
calls, complete exchange, and QSQ 
points lor each QSO. Multipliers should 
be dearly marked in each fog. Cross- 
check sheets (dupe sheets) are required 
1 1 more than 200 QSOs are made on 
any band 

Summary sheets should be a single 
page and snow number of QSOs, QSO 
points, zone multiplier tor each band and 
the total score. The summary sheet must 
contain The entrants callsign. region, 
zone, name, and address. Multi-operator 
stations must list the name and call (if 
any) of each operator. Entries tor the spe- 
cial UHF /microwave award should be indi- 
cated on the front ol the summary sheet 
with a description of the basis of theUHFf 
microwave award written on the back of 
the summary sheet. 

Entries must be postmarked by Febru- 



ary 28th and mailed to: PVRC, PO Bo* 337. 
Crownsville MD 21032. 

Each entrant agrees to be bound by the 
provisions of Ihe rules, by Ihe regulations 
of his licensing authority, and by the deci- 
sions of the Amateur Radio Activity 
Awards Committee. An entry may be dis- 
qualified 1 1 the overall score is reduced by 
more than two percent An entry will be 
disqualified II more than two percent of 
duplicates are left in the tog A penalty of 
6 OSO points will be assessed for each du- 
plicate QSO or for each miscopied call- 
sign or exchange found by the awards 
committee. 

HUNTING LIONS 
IN THE AIR CONTEST 

Starts: 1200 GMT January 15 
Ends: 1200 GMT January 16 

The contest is sponsored by Lions Club 
international and coordinated by Lions 
Club Rio de Janeiro Arpoador, Brazil. Par 
I ic ipation in the contest is open to all duly 
licensed radio operator Lion and non- 
Lion There are two modes: phone and 
CW. Participation in both modes is al 
lowed but points are counted separately 
All amateur stations participating must 
operate wiihm their licensing regulation, 
Separate categories will exist for single 
operators and radio clubs'socieiies, Mul 
1 1 -opera tors may participate, but each pre 
fix must be listed on ihe log 

Use all bands, SO through 10 meters. 
Only one OSO with the same station 
on each band may be counted, Hemem 
bar thai phone and CW are counted 
separately 1 

EXCHANGE 

HSfO and sequential OSO number 
When a contact is made with any Lron h 



VOLUNTEERS NEEDED 

How would yoq like to be on the "Inside" of a ma|or amateur-radio contest'' 
Here's your chance!" 

We're looking tor volunteers to become members ol the 73 Contest Commit- 
tee. Anyone with an interest In contesting and a willingness lo work hard is wel- 
come. Committee members will help wJlh the following 

i Contest rules and ethics 

2, Forms and correspondence 

3 Log checking and scoring 

4. Filling out and mailing awards 

Heading up the contest committee is KE7C. Please drop him a note {with 
SASGl and let him know you can help. Write lo Bill Goaney KE7C, 73 Contest 
Committee, 26G5 North Busby Road, Oak Harbor WA 96277 

We want YOU on the 73 Contest Team! 



102 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



Leo. or Lioness, the name of the ctub con- 
tacted should be clearly identified 

SCOW NQ: 

QSOs within the same continent count 
1 point while those be! ween different con- 
invents count 3 points Score 1 extra bo- 
nus point for each OSO with a member of 
a Ltons Club. Leo Club, or Lioness Club 
and 5 poinis for a OSO wiih a member ot 
the Lions Club Rio de Janeiro Arpoador 
Contacts beiween Brazilian stations will 
count only 2 extra points. Contacts be- 
tween members of the Arpoador club will 
not count any bonus points. 

AWARDS; 

For single operator entries the Lions 
Club International will present trophies 
lor first, second, and third place on both 
modes. Fourth through tenth places will 
receive plaques, A trophy will be present- 
ed to the first place radio club/society on 
both modes In addition, each log sent by 
participants with a minimum of 5 contacts 
wilt receive a special certificate. The con- 
test committee will also select and award 
the most active Lions Club participating 
In ihe contest 

ENTRiES, 

Keep a separate log for each mode. 
Each participant will note in the logs the 
catlsign and informal ton exchanged. Con- 
firmation of contacts will be made by 
comparing the logs of the participants. 
Participants should send their logs by air 
mail not later than 30 days after the con- 
test to: Contest Committee, Hunting 
Lions m the Air. Lions Club of Rio de 
Janeiro Arpoador, Rua Souza Lima *U9. 
Apt 402. 22081 Rio de Janeiro, RJ> Brazil. 



MICHIGAN QRP CLUB 
CW CONTEST 

Starts: 1500 GMT January 15 
Ends: 1500 GMT January 16 

This is a CW-only, attbands (160-10- 
meter) QRP contest sponsored by the 
Michigan ORP Club. The contest is open 
to all amateurs and all are eligible for 
awards General call will be CO QRP 
D€ ' Each station will be competing 
within thetr own state, province, or coun- 
try m one of three categories; 1} one Watt 
or less of output power, 2) five Watts or 
less of output power, and 3) over five 
Watts of output power. 

EXCHANGE: 

RST. OSO number, and power output. 

SCORING 

Each contact ss worth one OSO point. 
Multrpfy total QSO points (all bands) by 
the number of states, provinces, and 
countries worked pei band for total 
points. It using emergency power (tor 
natural and 100% battery) then apply a 1.5 
bonus multiplier 

AWARDS 

Certificates will be awarded to the high- 
est-scoring stations |fi each slate, prov- 
ince, of country. 

ENTRIES: 

Log information must include: lull log 
data with a separate log for each band, 
name, address, equipment used, and pow- 
er output Lags must be received by the 
contest manager no later than six weeks 
after the end oi the contest. VWVE stations 
please send en SASE all others please 
send 2 iRCs i! contest results are desired, 
Address aJJ entries to: Contest Manager, 
Michigan qhp Club, Z81 Crescent Drive, 
Portland Mf 48875 



THE NORTH DAKOTA 
QSO PARTY 

0000 to 0800 and 1600 to 2400 

GMT January 22, 
0800 to 1600 GMT January 23 

Sponsored again by the Red River Ra- 
dio Amateurs of Fargo. Worth Dakota. 
Worfc stations once per band and mode. 



EXCHANGE: 

RSfT) and state, province, country, or 
Norm Dakota county. Novices, please in- 
dicate Novice status 

FREQUENCIES: 

Phone— 1835, 3905. F2SG h 14295, 21380, 
2B5fiO\ 

CW-1&10, 3540, 7035. 14035. 21035, 
28035. 

Novice-3725. 7125. 21125. 28125 

SCORING: 

Phone contacts count 10 points. CW 
20 points, and RTTV 50 points. North 
Dakota stations count an additional 100- 
polnt bonus for working five Novices, 
North Dakota stations multiply score by 
total of states, provinces, and countries 
worked {max 53). 

EN TRIES 6 AWARDS 

Certificates to state, province, and 
country winners. Plaque to North Dakota 
winner and highest scorer outside North 
Dakota. Mall logs by February 26th to: Bill 
Shyder W0LHS. Bow 2784. Fargo ND 
50106-2784. Include a targe SASE for 
results. 



TEXAS QSO PARTY 

Starts: 0000 GMT January 22 
Ends: 2400 GMT January 23 

Sponsored by the West Texas Amateur 
Radio Club of Odessa. Texas. Use all 
bands and modes. Each station may be 
worked again upon each county change 
Slngie-operator entries only. CW QSOs 
musi be in CW subbands only. 

EXCHANGE: 

QSO number (beginning with 001) and 
state, province, country, or Texas county 

FREQUENCIES 

Novice— 3/tO. 7110, 21110.26110. 
Phone-3940, 7280, 14280, 21370, 
2S600. 

CW— 3565. 7065. 14065. 21065, 28065. 

SCORING 

All non- Texas stations score points as 
follows: Phone contact with ft*ed station 
In Tejcas— 1 point- CW contact with fixed 
station In Texas — 2 points. Phone contact 
with mobile station in Texas— 5 points. 
CW contact with mobile station in Texas 
— 7 points- Multiply by the number of 
Texas counties worked (254 max) 

All Texas stations score 1 point per con- 
tact on phone. 2 points on CW regardless 
whether fixed or mobile. Multiply by the 
number of states, countries, and Cana- 
dian provinces worked. 

AWARDS 

Plaques to top scores; US. US Novice, 
Dx. Canada. Texas fixed, Texas mobile, 
Texas Novice. Certificates to top score in 
each state, country, and province. Certili 
cafes also to top 10 Texas stations. Spe 
clal awards as activity dictates, 

ENTRIES: 

All logs musi be received by March 
tSth Mail entries to: VVTAFIC. PO Bo* 
9944. Odessa TX 79762O041 



RESULTS 



THE 1ST ANNUAL 40/80 PHONE CONTEST 
—A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS— 

"Truly unbelievable, it was fantastic, like catchm* fish in a barrel. , . " Those 
were the words and phrases echoed by nearly every contestant in 73'$ First An- 
nual 40- and 80-Meter Phone Contest. There is Utile doubt that this event will re- 
main on ihe contesl calendar for many years to come. We are grateful to those 
who made it all happen! 

Afier the dust had finally settled. V£SDX became the World *G-Mete* Phone 
Champion for singie-operaior stations. Congratulations to you Jim t a superb 
performance, I4VNO and company firmly took the World 40 Meter Champion- 
ship for the multi-operator category. Fantastic job, fellas! 

On SO Meters. I3MAU >s the World Single-Operator Phone Champion, and the 
group at N9NC tied down the winning score to take the world multi-operator title. 
Fabulous scores for such a difficult band. 

Combining both Ihe 40- and 60-meter contest scores, CNBCO became the 
1982 Low-Band Champion for single operators while VE2ZP end crew took top 
honors m ihe multi-operator category. Take a look at Ihe scoring summary, to 
see an impressive job by two top-notch stations. 

Who made the most contacts, you ask? Among 40-meter single ops. VE5DX 
m ade 972 QSO s. followed by K K9 A (856) a nd W9R E (85 1 ) I n t h e 40-meter m u 1 1 i-op 
standings. N9NB was credited with 1098 QSOs, followed by a distant second, 
KD4TO, with a demanding 972 contact total. On 80 meters, considering band 
conditions, the competition was [us I as fierce. N7DF from Utah I allied 700 OSOs 
for the single-operator category, while VE5XK accumulated 672 contacts on the 
band. In the 80-meter multi-operator class, N9NC and crew mustered 793 con- 
tacts with VE2ZP <597| and W4CN (564} trailing. 

Looking at the combined contest scores for both bands, N70F turned in 1 18S 
QSOs with 931 QSOs registered by second-place finisher KC40V in the single- 
operator category For multi-ops, VE2ZP recorded 1271 QSOs followed by 
N48AA of Florida with 1066 contacts 

Was Ihe band open? Well on 40-meters Ihe following stations turned in 30 or 
more OX country multiples: I4YNO <59| ( I5MPK (44), YV5ANE (44), W9ft£ (41), 
N3AMK (40), VE5DX (39), VE2ZP (38), CN8CO (38>. JA2BAV (35V. LX1JX t35X 
N4BAAQ3}, N9NB(3U and KJ3D(3l|. As expected. the&O-meler DX totals were 
somewhat less with the following stations scoring 20 or more DX multipliers. 
I3MAU (58), CN8CO 153). KQ2M (39), DAlflE <34|, WB2DHV (30). J5MPK (29), 
N4BAA128), KdCS{2&), DF9ZP(27) h ZF2DX (27), N7DF124), JA7ELY |22>, AKlA (22). 
andOKlKZ(22l, 

One of the most interesting aspects of tallying any contesl Is the opportunity 
to summarize the equipment used by competing stations. Every year brings new 
surprises 

Which antenna dominated on which band? Naturally the wire (economy ver- 
sion) array led the pack. Look at the statistics: 



40-Meter Antennas 




80 Meter Antennas 




Dipole/mverted veos 


39.B*/* 


Delta loop 


11.1% 


Mono band vertical 


11.6% 


Vj-wavesioper 


11.1% 


Delta loop 


&3% 


Full- wave vertical 


O J /q 


Trap vertical 


9-3% 


Trap vertical 


8.3% 


2-eiementyagi 


7.0% 


Phased verticals 


55% 


. .va^e slope* 


4.6% 


3-eiement wire vagi 


55% 


2-eFement detia loop 


4.6% 


tnverted-L 


2.7% 


2-element wire beam, 




2-elemenl delta loop 


2,7% 


bobtail curtains, 








2-element quads, 3-element yagis. 






and phased verticals 


2,3% each 







Ot all the stations that turned in entries. 2E% declared that they were running 
completely "barefoot" while 2% stated that they were running 500 Watts. 15% 
were running a kilowatt, and a dramatic 55% were radiating two kites' What 
were they using as exciters? 39.7% of the contestants claimed to be running 
Kenwoods, 21.3% were running Yaesu gear; 22.4% were operating Drake equip- 
ment, 6.5% were Collins, while Ihe remaining 10.1% were divided amongst Ten- 
Tec, Icom. Heat hk It, Tempo, and yes. even home-brew equipment. 

So what does all this add up to?, a debut not to be forgot ten. an event lull of 
surprises which left a tasting impression on all who witnessed this two-day 
extravaganza. 

This brings us to the second annual event which is )us! around the corner. 
Look for the 40* and 80-rneter contest announcement in lasi month's issueof 73. 
This year the event is being split into two separate parts. The World 40-Meter 
Phone Championship will be held on January 9. while the World BO-Meter Phone 
Championship event is scheduled for the following day. January 9. 1963. Each 
promises to become a record breaker in us own right. For all Ihe details, send 
your SASE directly to the official contesl address, attention Billy Maddox. 468 
Century Vista Drive. Arnold MD 21012, 

So start pruning your antennas. I intend to work each one of you on both 
bands so mark the dates on your calendar. Get on Ihe band righi now and begin 
telling other amateurs about the contesl, especially the OX stations. Pitch in 
and pass the word! Good luck in the contest. 

Continued 



73 Magazine ■ January, 1983 103 



40/BQ-METER CONTEST SOAPBOX 



"Gtad to take part, ever? // it was just a tittle bit Realty en toyed itr—NIBMV. 

"Lots of tuft. Am going to try 86 meters next y^sr/— KAlCOC- 

"Super contest. . J know ill be back next year!"—WAJZAM. 

"Too many carriers and foreign broadcasts on 40!"—KA2HTH 

"My first contest ever Realty enjoyed ft and am looking forward to next 

year."—WB2tWJ, 

"The gang here had a blast. ' t ^KF2X. 

"Fine contest but i suggest limiting the action to the general portion of the 

hand."-N3AWS. 

"Would have iiked to have participated more. Look tor me again next 

year'—w3iCM 

"You've got another winner 1 *— K31XO. 

"Great contest— lots of great contacts were made on the 40 this 

weekend "-KF3M. 

'Hope to get a vfo and increase my multiplier total. Sure enjoyed the 
contest '-KC3N 

"Enjoyed the contest and, once and toratK recognized the District ot Colum- 
bia as a separate multiplier* '^W3USS. 

"Good propagation at times. Fantastic turnout Should be a classic 
eveni"—N4&AA 

"Qreat contest with tots of potential as the years go by. "-N4UH. 
"Had a vary good time and worked some new states. ra — N5AFV. 
"TNX tor sponsoring this enjoy able contest. Had a greet time 
on4Q"—N5GPQ. 

"Whooee. quite an event I"— KC5NQ. 
"Learned a lot about my station. Looking forward to next year "—W&SYWO, 

Better to have the 40-meter test on €W rethef than SSB. —N6JM 
"A very good contest Not much heard dun ng the daytime"— W6YMH 
"Thanks tor staging this contest. I enjoyed it immensely. Hope to be back 
neir year to improve the score."— KA7AXQ. 
"Where were the VEs* Great stateside turnout!"— N7DF. 
"Where were the JAs?"—K87G 
"Let's do it again next yeat'"—AK7J. 
"Great contest and iff be beck next yearf"—K7PGL 

Fine contest idea, thanks to 73. Lots ot activity on the bands. Wish there 
was more DX on 40. —N8ATR. 

"Damn tun despite the tremendous big guns fit give it a shot again next 
year'—rtCSGN, 

"Very successful debut. Good time ot year too* See you next year tor 
sure l "—W8VEN, 

W/VE 40-METER SINGLE OPERATOR 



Callsign 


QTH 


QSOs 


OSOPts, 


SUPr. 


DX 


Total 


VE5DXW 


SASK 


972 


1193 


56 


39 


113240 


W9RE* 


IN 


851 


1084 


56 


41 


105146 


N3AMK- 


PA 


771 


1042 


55 


40 


99180 


KK9AJ-) 


IL 


856 


1093 


57 


25 


87440 


KA1XN* 


MA 


761 


802 


56 


23 


83358 


WB8JBM" 


OH 


759 


823 


56 


19 


61725 


KC4QV* 


TN 


600 


736 


67 


14 


59816 


KC5NG- 


TX 


663 


730 


55 


18 


53290 


KC3NB 


PA 


674 


872 


53 


3 


48832 


N8AKYB 


Ml 


441 


538 


53 


21 


44252 


KF3M 


PA 


675 


629 


48 


5 


43937 


WAflDK" 


MN 


539 


639 


51 


13 


mm 


N7DF" 


UT 


488 


547 


51 


11 


38290 


KA1CDGH 


MA 


516 


661 


48 


4 


34372 


KC8JHH 


OH 


400 


480 


52 


2D 


33120 


N8ATR 


OH 


477 


637 


45 


6 


32487 


VE2RV* 


QU 


305 


397 


55 


25 


31760 


KLTHHXh 


AK 


2fl9 


570 


40 


14 


30780 


K3MRG 


PA 


380 


651 


53 




29203 


K4HAV(-) 


GA 


434 


535 


45 


9 


28890 


WD4IBO 


GA 


484 


570 


47 


2 


27360 


K9MWM(-} 


00 


488 


495 


50 


5 


27225 


W1MWA1R) 


MA 


370 


444 


46 


15 


27084 


K5ZDH 


TX 


353 


372 


52 


10 


23064 


WBeUFLH 


IA 


288 


307 


46 


10 


22052 


W36GN 


PA 


259 


430 


42 


8 


21500 


WA6YTMH 


WV 


423 


483 


34 


7 


19703 


NF4FH 


TN 


348 


357 


45 


5 


17850 


K7PGLH 


MT 


284 


297 


42 


13 


16335 


KA4RKDB 


AL 


27B 


335 


44 


4 


16060 


K3IXDH 


MD 


220 


2S9 


45 


3 


15022 


WB2THN* 


NY 


263 


266 


48 


6 


14384 


NR4S 


TN 


216 


349 


38 


3 


14309 


WA2BFI/0 


IL 


250 


269 


45 


4 


131B1 


WA0TKJ(-) 


KS 


135 


196 


35 


28 


12474 


KA9CTM 


IL 


196 


240 


46 


1 


H280 


AA4FFH 


VA 


161 


189 


40 


19 


H 151 


W6ANM 


OH 


196 


259 


37 


4 


10619 


N4ARO 


TN 


213 


243 


39 


3 


10026 


WB9UZR 


IL 


174 


290 


32 


2 


9860 


WSPWG 


TX 


154 


184 


43 


9 


9668 



"I seem to have scored very welt. Lots ot good contacts to be had. '-KK9A. 

"Everyone involved has my congratulations i wish all contests were this 

much tun" — KJ9D 

"Surprised at the number ot stations on the 4Q-meter band. Broadcast stations really 

got fierce! WW try SG-meters next year:"— K9FMR 

"Bands wwe m great shape Had a great time."—KB9Tt. 

"Activity and band conditions were excel f ant. Korea on 15 was a new one for 

me!'—KQC$. 

^Qreat contest. Nice to work a contest that doesn't take up aii weekend, 

Famltyman special!"— WAWDK. 

"Excellent contest. Definitely will be back next year rT —K*jUK. 

"W&4QXZ and I found it rough going on 86. Worth every minute ot it though. 

Hade ball"—C6ADV. 

"Qetmiteiy should become one of the biggies' Unbelievable parttctpetton tor 

a first time event' —CN&CO 

"Fun contest I'll tell more Europeans about ft "-DL3UI. 

"t know whyCWis beautiful now— very hard on phone with 50 Waits. There's 

always next year."— G3WKS. 

"My first touch of 40- and 80-meter contesting and t loved it. "— H44SH. 

"Marvelous contest though conditions weren't the best for me. Am looking 

forward to next year."—HlBGB. 

"Nice contest indeed. We hope to do better next year/'—MYNQ. 

"Very good contest Not much activity m jAi&nd on contest"— JA1FFY. 

"Lots ot activity on 40-meters but not many Europeans. See you again next 

vear' — LASYF. 

"Good propagation but no Europeans m the contest. Maybe next year it will 

get more attention. '—LXtJX. 

"Very good idee to establish this contest Hope more Europeans hear about 

it* See you next year "— OK2BLG 

"Thanks for the contest a very good idea Entoyed 50 meters — QXJZA*. 

"Dfdn"t work a single North American station. "-PA3A2M 

"Nice contest with good propagation Wish w/VEs would listen below 3.800 

MHi. Very strong in Europe!"— SM4C AN 

"Great contest and is sure to grow as it gets more publicity. '— VEIAJJ. 

"Thoroughly enjoyed the contest. Very weft conceived, very well attended— a 

defini re winner! ' — VE2ZP. 

"Appreciate the contests, 80 was very difficult with 20 + static. USA stations 

forget we can only work 3.5-3 7 on phone/'— VK5BW. 

"Very tittle activity in Romania Maybe advertisements will help"—YQ4BXX 



KJ7RH 


ID 


161 


183 


40 


11 


9333 


VE1AJJ- 


MB 


143 


179 


42 


10 


9308 


KRBX 


OH 


2fi2 


262 


35 




9170 


AK3J 


PA 


144 


208 


38 


5 


8944 


W2FTYH 


NY 


114 


162 


36 


13 


7938 


N8TN 


OH 


200 


233 


32 


3 


7922 


WA4LRO 


TN 


123 


133 


38 


11 


6517 


K5UCV 


TX 


127 


164 


35 


3 


6232 


WSDN 


OH 


112 


139 


41 


2 


5977 


N9AMLH 


IN 


107 


161 


37 




5957 


KB7GH 


WA 


120 


136 


37 


8 


5848 


KD4WY(-J 


NC 


140 


157 


33 




5181 


W3ARK 


PA 


206 


206 


24 




4944 


WB5YWOH 


OK 


121 


130 


35 


3 


4940 


WD6MOV 


OH 


53 


111 


24 


20 


4884 


K1NCDH 


CT 


106 


166 


29 




4715 


W3ETB 


PA 


125 


167 


25 


3 


4676 


WA3JXW 


PA 


136 


13S 


34 




4624 


KI7M(-) 


OR 


89 


107 


30 


13 


4601 


WB90BXB 


W! 


157 


157 


29 




4553 


WA2HCCB 


NJ 


110 


156 


25 


3 


4368 


W5CPO 


TX 


94 


118 


37 




4366 


N5CMF 


TX 


81 


97 


43 




4171 


N5AFV 


OK 


102 


119 


35 




4165 


KF1B 


n 


77 


98 


29 


13 


4116 


N4DEF 


GA 


106 


127 


29 


3 


4064 


K4FPF 


VA 


82 


111 


31 


4 


3885 


N3AWS 


PA 


93 


123 


29 




3567 


W8VEN 


WV 


96 


98 


34 


1 


3430 


KJ2N 


NJ 


63 


92 


20 


16 


3312 


K3ND 


PA 


89 


99 


32 


5 


3267 


W5GVP 


TX 


80 


91 


30 


4 


3196 


W3AP 


PA 


73 


100 


2? 


4 


3100 


W6YMH- 


CA 


72 


81 


26 


9 


2997 


K1VUT 


MA 


94 


98 


26 


4 


2940 


N0CZQH 


NO 


61 


95 


29 




2755 


W4KMS 


VA 


37 


87 


29 




2523 


KJ9FI 


IL 


■54 


84 


30 




2520 


WB8YEW 


OH 


78 


78 


32 




2496 


KC7EH 


OR 


52 


68 


24 


12 


2312 


K8CV 


Ml 


56 


63 


29 


7 


2268 


KC8P 


Ml 




66 


32 




2112 


KC8GN 


OH 


66 


67 


30 




2010 


K8JOS 


OH 


64 


80 


25 




2000 



104 73 Magazine • January. 1983 






WA2IFS 


NJ 


35 


59 


9 


17 


1534 


NL7D 


AK 


34 


67 


20 


1 


1407 


KBOC(-) 


MN 


51 


52 


24 


1 


1300 


KA7AKQ 


WA 


4a 


49 


24 


1 


1225 


K3ZJH 


DC 


70 


70 


16 




1120 


N1AOX 


MA 


46 


91 


10 




910 


WD60YF 


OH 


S3 


53 


16 




848 


WD6MRF 


OH 


40 


82 


15 




735 


WAWVWW 


MN 


32 


32 


32 




704 


W3YA 


PA 


44 


44 


15 




660 


W7ABXB 


NV 


26 


30 


14 


4 


540 


KS9IT 


IL 


30 


39 


11 




429 


NAM 


CA 


10 


20 


15 


1 


320 


AK7F 


WA 


10 


10 


6 




80 


N2DCH 


NY 





9 


7 




56 


■ District champion 












H StaieVpixnnncial champion 










{Wt Contest 


winner 













W/VE 40-METER MULT I -OPERATOR 

Callftifln QTH QSOi QSO Pts. SUPr. OX Total 

31 
24 
38 
31 
33 
27 



N9N8OT 


IN 


1008 


1323 


54 


KD4TQ* 


KY 


972 


1208 


55 


VE2ZP* 


QUE 


704 


909 


57 


KJ9D* 


IN 


681 


927 


53 


N4BAAH 


FL 


645 


772 


53 


KF2X* 


NY 


m 


774 


48 


N4FKF 


KY 


303 






KA2HTHH 


NY 


267 


422 


28 


W3YA' 


PA 


44 


44 


15 



11; 

95432 



77868 
66392 
58050 



11316 
660 



* District champion 

{-) State/provincial champion 

fW) Contest winner 



DX 40-METER SINGLE OPERATOR 

OTH QSOs QSO Pis. StJPr. DX 



Caltsign 

YV5AME{W) 

CN6CO* 

H44SH' 

LA5YF* 

JA2BAY* 

HI4AGE* 

CT4KO* 

YV3BQS 

VK5BW* 

ucux- 

DLBUI' 

JA1ELY 

SM4CAN- 

OK1AGN" 

I4CSP* 

G3WKS* 

Y09CUR3' 

G5EBA 

JA1FFY 

PA3AZM* 

Y04BXX 

YQ3KWJ 

(W> Contest winner 

" DX country champion 



Venezuela 


359 


732 


Morocco 


361 


744 


Solomon Is. 


291 


581 


N or way 


221 


513 


Japan 


205 


390 


Dom. Rep- 


209 


417 


Portugal 


169 


350 


Venezuela 


155 


312 


Australia 


157 


JOti 


Luxembourg 


119 


246 


West Germany 


72 


139 


Japan 


68 


130 


Sweden 


23 


48 


Czechoslovakia 


17 


50 


Italy 


21 


38 


England 


14 


44 


Romania 


18 


23 


England 


11 


22 


Japan 


9 


17 


Netherlands 


e 


18 


Romania 


to 


20 


Romania 


3 


6 



46 



45 
37 

38 

45 

33 

32 

21 

1 

19 

22 

15 

1 

1 



44 
38 
20 
26 
35 
17 
20 
23 
22 
35 
16 
15 

12 

12 

6 

10 

9 

5 

e 

5 
3 



Total 

65880 

61008 

37765 

32319 

28470 

24603 

18550 

17160 

13158 

8856 

4865 

4810 

690 

650 

494 

264 

230 

198 

136 

108 

100 

1B 



Call sign 



DX 40-METER MULTI-OPERATOR 

QTH QSOs QSO Pts. SUP?. 



DX 



Total 



WYNO (W) 


Italy 


672 


1400 


33 


59 


1 ZdOUU 


I5MPK- 


Italy 


590 


1206 


44 


45 


107334 



(W) Contest winner 
* DX country champion 



Callsign 

K02M<W) 

N70F' 

K6CS* 

WB2DHY' 

VE5XK' 

K2SWPH 

KB9MW* 

N8ATH" 

NA6T* 

N8AKYH 

K6UKH 

KC40V* 



W/VE 80-METER SINGLE OPERATOR 

QTH QSOs QSO Pis. SliPr, DX 



NY 

UT 

MO 

NY 

SASK 

NY 

IL 

OH 

CA 

Ml 

CO 

TN 



510 


ODD 


52 


700 


739 


54 


552 


635 


53 


346 


545 


43 


672 


68t 


54 


4S2 


530 


50 


530 


570 


52 


311 


326 


47 


373 


454 


5! 


430 


453 


50 


407 


417 


49 


331 


342 


46 



39 
24 

28 
30 

8 
15 

7 
11 
19 
11 

7 
10 



Total 

60606 

57642 
51435 
42510 
42222 
34450 
33630 
32487 
31850 
27633 
23352 
19152 



KC8JH(-) OH 

WA1ZAM* MA 

KB3ND" PA 

KI7MH OR 

N4AROH TN 

AK1AH NH 

W6TPHH CA 

KD4XPH AL 

W4P2VB F L 

VE1AJJ* NB 

W3BGNH P A 

KAJRH MA 

KC5LK* MS 

WA1TCAH CT 

W3AP PA 

N6ZA CO 

WA2IFS*-) NJ 

K88WB OH 

KKSt OH 

WB2TKB NY 

NO I N Ori 

W5PWGH TX 

WAMVWW MN 

KF1B CT 

WD8MRF OH 

NT5R MA 

KR8X OH 

WB8YEW OH 

W8VENI-) WV 

WBANM OH 

KJ2N NJ 

NtBMV CT 

WIGOM(-) OK 

K3ND PA 

W4KMS(-) VA 

W3ETB PA 

K3ZJH DC 

VE1QO* QUE 

WD6MOV OH 

KB7M(-) WY 

WB2IWJ NY 

W2FTY NY 

K1NCD CT 

AK7R-) WA 

WB90BXH Wl 

W1LUG MA 

KBCV Ml 

WD60YF OH 

KB9IT IL 

K4FPF VA 

NDCMCH ND 

W8YMH CA 

AK7J(-) A2 

W3SCM(-> MD 

N2DCH NY 

W7A8X(-) NV 

NL7DH AK 

KA7AKO WA 

• District 

H Statefprovinclal 

fW) Contest winner 



335 

363 
294 
232 
254 
168 
228 
244 
141 
149 
152 
202 
150 
149 
144 
112 
126 
119 
150 
126 
153 
114 
118 
94 
00 
90 
133 
94 
97 



87 
100 

n 

71 
76 
82 
04 
74 



55 
72 
47 

58 
43 
51 
52 
40 
47 
43 
41 
26 
28 
19 
21 
20 
20 
11 
8 



342 
367 
305 
271 
259 
206 
240 
248 
161 
178 
198 
209 
161 
154 
160 
125 
133 
126 
150 
131 
153 
119 
118 
102 
96 
99 
133 
96 
97 



BO 

100 

74 

76 

76 
86 
95 
79 
59 
55 
72 
48 
58 
45 
51 
52 
40 
47 
43 
41 
26 
28 
19 
22 
20 
20 
20 
8 



46 
45 
45 
53 
49 
41 
41 
41 
46 
40 
30 
30 
45 
40 
38 
41 
42 
42 
36 
36 
33 
29 
38 
35 
37 
33 



37 
34 
36 

31 
27 
32 

29 
31 
25 
22 

22 
29 

30 

20 

27 

22 

28 

21 

21 

27 

20 

T9 

19 

20 

17 

16 

10 

11 

10 

3 

3 



7 

4 

10 

6 

4 

22 

12 

3 

18 

17 

19 

7 

2 

5 

3 

11 

5 

7 

4 

3 

8 

3 
5 



3 

5 

1 
1 
5 
2 



1 
2 



W/VE 80-METER MULTI-OPERATOR 



Callslgn 

N9NC(W) 

VE2ZP- 

N4BAA* 

W4CNB 

KF2X* 

AJ1E* 

N4FKF 

WB0TCF" 

W3YA* 



OTN 

IN 

QUE 

FL 

KY 

NY 

MA 

KY 

MO 

PA 



QSOS 

793 



421 
564 

413 
144 

212 

93 

2 



812 
597 
456 

581 

432 

"Mia 

118 
2 



54 
53 
52 
50 
48 
40 

37 

1 



17 
18 
28 
11 
11 
17 



' District 

(-J Stale 

(W) Contest winner 



18126 

17983 

16775 

15989 

13727 

12978 

12720 

10912 

10304 

10146 

9702 

7733 

7567 

6930 



BSOti 
6251 
6174 
5400 
5240 
5049 
4998 



4386 



3762 
3724 
3962 



3168 



2700 

2590 

2516 

2356 

2336 

2185 

2133 

1829 

1650 

1440 

1344 

1276 

1250 

1155 

1092 

1080 

940 

817 

779 

520 

476 

304 

242 

220 

200 

80 

24 



OSOPts. SlJPr OX Totil 



57652 

42387 

36480 

35441 

25488 

21033 

8682 

4366 

2 



Cslltfgn 

I3MAU(W) 

CN8CO* 

C6ADV* 

HlBGBG' 

OK1MSM* 

HI8GB 



DX dO-METER SINGLE OPERATOR 

OTH QSOs OSOPts. SLfPr. DX 



Italy 

Morocco 
Bahamas 
Dom. Rep 
Czechoslovakia 
Dom Rep. 



507 
441 

149 
165 
148 



983 
BBS 

316 
2&4 
320 
284 



40 
23 
52 
49 
52 
41 



58 
53 

16 
9 

10 



Total 

96334 

67032 
21488 
17052 
16640 
14484 



73 Magazine * January, 1983 105 



DF9ZP- 


Wesl Germany 


121 


239 


26 


27 


12667 


ZF2DX* 


Grand Cayman 


149 


178 


42 


27 


12262 


0X3ZW 


Greenland 


117 


234 


26 


18 


10810 


YV3BQS* 


Venezuela 


96 


192 


35 


16 


9792 


JA1ELY* 


Japan 


126 


216 


18 


22 


8240 


DA1RE 


West Germany 


107 


200 




34 


6800 


H44SH* 


Solomon Is. 


69 


137 


19 


15 


5658 


8P6KX* 


Barbados 


78 


106 


25 


17 


4462 


JH7JGG 


Japan 


89 


159 


14 


9 


3657 


OK1KZ 


Czechoslovakia 


52 


89 


1 


22 


2047 


OK1AGN 


Czechoslovakia 


37 


73 


4 


15 


1387 


SM4CAN* 


Sweden 


30 


60 


11 


9 


1200 


0K28LG 


Czechoslovakia 


26 


51 


14 


7 


1071 


I4CSP- 


Italy 


36 


70 


1 


14 


1050 


G5EBA* 


England 


32 


62 




14 


966 


DL8UI 


West Germany 


20 


39 


7 


6 


507 


Y04BXX' 


Romania 


21 


41 




9 


369 


PA3AZM* 


Netherlands 


16 


36 




10 


360 


DF3AQ 


West Germany 


17 


34 


6 


4 


340 


JA5AUC 


Japan 


16 


28 


7 


3 


260 


VK58VT 


Australia 


13 


22 


1 


9 


220 


JA3HTT 


Japan 


9 


16 




6 


96 


Y03KWJ 


Romania 


6 


11 




4 


44 


* DX country 














(W) Contest winner 












Cheek tog: Y06LV 













Callsign 



DX 80-METER MULTI-OPERATOR 

QTH QSOs QSO Pts. SUPr. 



ISMPKjW) ItaJy 

(WJ Contest winner 



191 



376 



30 



DX 
29 



Total 

22184 



Callsign 



W/VE COMBINED 40/80-METER 
SINGLE OPERATOR 

QTH QSOs QSO Pts. St./Pr. DX 



Total 



N7DF(W) 


UT 


1188 


1286 


105 


33 


180040 


KC40V* 


TN 


931 


1076 


113 


24 


147666 


N6AKY* 


Ml 


860 


1051 


103 


32 


141865 


1MB AT R 


OH 


788 


963 


92 


17 


104967 


KCSJH 


OH 


735 


802 


98 


27 


100250 


W3&GN* 


PA 


411 


628 


72 


27 


62172 


N4ARO 


TN 


467 


502 


88 


7 


47690 


VE1AJJ* 


NB 


297 


357 


82 


27 


38913 


KI7M* 


OR 


321 


378 


83 


19 


38556 


WSFWG" 


TX 


268 


303 


82 


12 


26482 


W8ANM 


OH 


284 


347 


73 


4 


26719 


N8TN 


OH 


353 


386 


65 


2 


25862 


KR&X 


OH 


395 


396 


53 




20935 


W3AP 


PA 


217 


260 


65 


7 


16720 


KF1B* 


CT 


171 


2O0 


64 


21 


17000 


W2FTY' 


MY 


161 


210 


63 


14 


16170 


WA2IFS 


NJ 


163 


192 


51 


23 


14016 


KJ2N 


NJ 


150 


191 


51 


22 


13943 


W3ETB 


PA 


207 


253 


50 


4 


13662 


W8VEN 


WV 


193 


195 


68 


1 


13455 




KK9A. 



WB6YBN 


OH 


108 


170 


53 


22 


12750 


K3ND 


PA 


160 


177 


61 


11 


12744 


K1NCD 


CT 


164 


223 


51 




11373 


WABWWW' 


MH 


150 


150 


70 




1050O 


WB9QBX* 


Wl 


206 


208 


50 




10400 


W4KMS 


VA 


163 


163 


60 




9760 


WD8MRF 


OH 


139 


177 


52 


3 


9735 


K4FPF 


VA 


123 


152 


50 


4 


8208 


K6CV 


Ml 


96 


103 


56 


7 


6489 


K3ZJ 


DC 


164 


165 


36 


1 


6435 


W6YMH* 


CA 


100 


109 


45 


9 


5886 


WD60YF 


OH 


100 


100 


36 




3600 


K99IT 


IL 


82 


62 


30 




2460 


NL7D 


AK 


45 


87 


23 


2 


2175 


AK7F 


WA 


53 


55 


34 


2 


1960 


KA7AKQ 


WA 


56 


57 


27 


1 


1596 


W7ABX 


NV 


46 


50 


24 


4 


1400 


N2DCH 


NY 


29 


29 


16 




522 


* District au 


ard 












(W) Contest winner 













W/VE COMBINED 40/80-METER 
MULTIOPERATOR 



Caltsign 


QTH 


QSOs 


QSO Pts. 


SUPr. 


DX 


Total 


VE2ZP(W) 


QUE 


1271 


1506 


110 


56 


249996 


N4BAA 


FL 


1066 


1228 


105 


61 


205076 


KF2X 


NY 


978 


1206 


96 


38 


161604 


W3YA 


PA 


48 


46 


16 




736 



(yV) Contest winner 



DX COMBINED 40/80-METER 
SINGLE OPERATOR 



Callsign 


QTH 


QSOs 


QSO Pts, 


SUPr. 


DX 


Total 


CN8CO(W) 


Morocco 


802 


1626 


67 


91 


256908 


H44SH 


Solomon Is. 


360 


718 


64 


35 


71082 


YV3BQS 


Venezuela 


251 


504 


67 


39 


53424 


JA1ELY 


Japan 


196 


346 


40 


37 


26642 


VK5BW 


Australia 


170 


326 


22 


31 


17384 


DLBUI 


West Germany 


92 


176 


26 


22 


6544 


OK1AGN 


Czechoslovakia 


54 


123 


5 


27 


3936 


SM4CAN 


Sweden 


53 


106 


26 


9 


3710 


I4CSP 


Italy 


59 


106 


2 


26 


3024 


G5EBA 


England 


43 


64 




23 


1932 


PA3AZM 


Netherlands 


17 


54 




16 


864 


Y04BXX 


Romania 


31 


61 




14 


854 


Y03KWJ 


Romania 


9 


17 




7 


119 



(W) Contest winner 



CoHsign 
I5MPK(W) 



DX COMBINED 40/80 METER 
MULTI-OPERATOR 

QTH QSOs QSOfts. SUPr. 

ftaly 781 1582 74 



DX 
74 



Total 
234136 




From left to right: t4ZNU, HOUT. 14JMY, and 14YNO. 



106 73 Magazine * January* 1983 






W9RE AND W8NG0 
160-METER WORLD CHAMPIONS 



'The most actiVFty ever heard on 160". Best contest I've ever operated" . 
"An absolute wrnnerr. "Definitely will try again next year " These wekconie com- 
ments were heard agam and again in the wake of 73' s 1982 "top- band" event. 
Wrapped up my Worked All Slates" "Thanks to the contest l worked another 
new country 1 " These were some of the rewards earned for iust a few hours of con. 
test operation by nearly 1500 participants. 

ff you fe a supporter of 160 meters, you can't help bul notice how much the con- 
test has grown since its inception some 3 years ago The bright future of this world- 
champion ship event seems assured. 



Year 

I960 
1931 
1962 



Participants 

569 
917 
1482 



W4VKK. KB8HW. and W2FJ with 53; K1MNS, W5YZ, KA6HIG. and KA7BTQ with 5£ 
and KC40V. KflJSTF, WA2GZB, N7DF, and K1LPS with 51 W/VE multipliers 

Fur the multi operator category, W6NGO K9YUG. and K9ZUH accumulated the 
most vWE multipliers, with 56 each; AK2E had 54. W4CN had 53, K0UK had 52. and 
W9ZX had 51 slates and provinces, 

Screening ail logsheels, EA5ET worked 17 DX counlhes. followed by G3XWZ'A 
wilh 1& countries: W&LRL with 13, HMH t OK1AVG, and WtCF w*th 12. WB3GCG 
and VE1YX wilh 1 1; and ZF2DX with 10 

After all (he contest entries have been tabulated, it is rewarding to analyze I he 
station equipment and antennas used by the participants The tables beio w tell the 
story 



This year, W9RE single handed I y produced 1116 QSOs, 58 states and provinces, 
and B DX counties to become the 1982 World 160- Meter Phone Champion for 
single-operator stations Mike managed to beat second place finishes and 1961 
World Champion WSLFtL by a margin ot 136 QSOs and 20.000 points. A race as 
Close as this, involving two of Jhe most promineni stations on ihe band, seis the 
stage for our 1963 event just around the corner The upcoming contest will decide 
the best two out of three 

8oth W9RE and WBLRL a*e to be congratulated for theif superb performance in 
our own 'Survival of the fittest Who wjII surpass W9RES 1 1 1B QSOs which now 
establishes a world record on 1607 

In the multi-operator category, the crew members at W8NGO are the 1982 World 
Champions. They compiiecf 677 QSOs, 56 elates and provinces, and A DX countries 
lor a loial score of 273,900 conle&l points The gang at W4CN, last year's World 
Championship station, finished second with a total of 236.950 points It was a very 
close race for the top slot, wilh only 73 QSOs and 1 multiplier separating the two 
stations. Here again, ihe 1963 contest will decide ihe best two out of three, since 
last year s champions finished second this hme 

Of aft the singfeiQperator en tr res, the tol lowing stations compiled 500 of more 
QSOs W9RE ii 1 m. W8L.RL (9821, WB3GCG (9321 WD8CRY {762), WB6CMM (722), 
WtCF (6971. KJ90 (622). NBATR (582fc N5JB 15791. KC8P (56 T). K9GLL (552), W3BGN 
(524), and N5CG (502) 

In the mull l-operator class, 500 or more QSOs were earned by the following sta 
lions: W8NGO (877), W4CN (604). AK2E (688>, K9ZUH (677), W9ZX (512), and K9YUG 
(504) 

W9HE worked Ihe most stages and provinces (58) for the singleHoperator class, 
followed by W8LRL and WB3GGG with 57, K9RJ with 56, KC8P WD8CRY KJ9D 
N5JB, WB6CMM. and K9QLL with 55; vVlCF. W9DUB. and W«CM with 54, N5CG 



Equipment 


Usage 


Kenwood 


38.5% 


Yaesu 


27.0% 


Drake 


20.5% 


Icom 


4.9% 


Ten-Tec 


3,3% 


Collins 


2.4% 


Hy-Gain. Astro, 




Heath. Signal One 


.85% each 



Equipment used in ttte 1 60-Meter 
Phone Contest 



Antenna 

Dipolenn verted vee 
Inverted L 



Usage 

37.3% 
153% 



%-wave sloper 


9.3% 


Trap vertical 


9.3% 


Shunt-fed tower 


7,9% 


Vertical {V*, full wave) 


7.9% 


Long wire 


5,7% 


Vi-wave sloper 


2.8% 


Quad, delta loop. 




5*efement yagi. 




wtndom. zepp 


9 u s each 


Receive antennas onfy: 




Beverage 


10.7% 


Loop configuration 


1.9% 


Antennas used In the 160-Meter Phone 


Contest, 





The success of this very popular contest would not have been possible without 
the dedication of two superb gentlemen of the '"gentleman's band-' Our special 
thanks to Dan WA2G28 and Ed K3JXD who both tackled the responsibilities ol 
scoring all the entries and corresponding with the entrants. These gents have been 
involved with this world-champion shm contest ever since its founding some three 
years ago. Both have burned the midnight oil countless nights when the rest of us 
were enjoying the openings on the band, 

The 4(h annual contest is |ust around Ihe comer. After you reatf Ibese result.:., 
pass I hem on to your friends on 16Q« Be sure Ihey're aware of our world- 
championship contest, scheduled lot January 15 16. 196,1 II you think this year's 
scores were record breakers, wail until January 19S31 With Ihe relaxation of the 
FCC rules on this band, we e*peci to see nearly 2.000 stations participating CD be 
there, how about you? 



WORLD 160-METER PHONE CHAMPIONSHIP 
MULTI-OPERATOR STATIONS 



Calls ign 


State 


QSO 


SUPr, 


DX 


Points 


werJGO(W) 


Mi 


B77 


56 


4 


273,900 


W4CN' 


KY 


804 


S3 


6 


238.950 


AK2E' 


NY 


668 


54 


8 


224,750 


K9ZUH* 


IN 


677 


56 


6 


213.280 


K9YUG 


IL 


504 


56 


4 


152.400 


K6UK* 


CO 


467 


53 


5 


137.120 


wazx 


IL 


512 


51 


— 


130 560 


N8AKY* 


Ml 


369 


50 


3 


98,560 


KBffTJ 


CO 


324 


50 


— 


61000 


AA1K/3* 


DE 


279 


46 


7 


75,525 


K86AC' 


OH 


244 


44 


1 


56,350 


N4DBR 


KY 


219 


40 


— 


43300 


K0UR* 


KS 


189 


43 


1 


4t<60G 


W&CEM 


KS 


143 


45 


1 


31,970 


WD8NJR 


Ml 


133 


40 


1 


27.470 


KB&SF 


CO 


136 


40 


— 


27.200 


DFSZDrA* 


Germany 


35 


— 


6 


3.135 



(W) Wortd Champion (or 1962 

StaterfProvmoaVDX Country Champion 
Disqualified: WBflJQM 



160-METER CONTEST SOAPBOX 

"A very excellent test. Something should he done about improving the conditions, 
however (hi) ■— W1B&. 

' 'Suggest you give a multiplier of zero tor atikWs ta tion s With their excess power, 
that would certamty thin the resutts considerably. *'— AA I K. 
"My first try at a contest Hope I hetp those needing Rhode Island. "-W1LOV 
"Excellent conditions the first night Sum was a fantastic contest and t'm realty 
fQoking forward to next year, now more than ever." — HI LPS 
"Lots of activity, The hand was extremely crowded."— KtNBN 
"A very tme event? Marty big signets, and there were more stations on the band 
than I have ever heard on 160 meters*"— K2DWI. 

"Had nothing but antenna problems the 1st night Blew a borrowed rig to top it oft. 
i'li be back next year though. "-AK2E. 



Excellent tirst-mght European opening "-N41N 

"Scow would have been higher but had 300 kHz interference from an op who fives 
just down the mad. He dettberatety QRMs and the FCC has given him warnings 
about tt "-W4PZV 

'My first 73 contest Had a great time. Wifi have a better receiving setup next 
year."-W4TMR. 
"The most enjoyabie contest I've ever been In!"— W4TWW 

A bunch of activity on the band Hardly any DX. '-WB4ZPF. 

Must say there was much activity and I certainty entoyed it very much " — N5CG 
"f n/oyed me contest Sounded Utoe 20 meters. The strobe tight atop my 300 vertical 
gave my receiver tits throughout the contest "— W5GFA 
"Thanks tor a fine tSO-meier contest "-AE5H. 

"Nice contest Ended up doing surgery and mtssed halt ot it. unfortunate- 
h//'—K5JZN, 

"Lots and tots of QRMr—WSLFG 
"Very interesting contest. Sure enioyad it. " — KC5LK 

"Sure had lota of tun in the contest. Lots of QSOs and tots of QRM'—K6ANP> 
"Great contest. Wish I could have wonted the entire event."— WD&EFU. 
"En/oyed it, as t'm sure everybody did. Second night was not as good as the first- 
Doubled last year's score, though:'— W6WBY 

"Had lo work both ntghts but managed to slip in a few Nevada multipliers for the 
stations on the band/"— W7ABX 

'^Sounds like the contest is growing every year. Had a great time as did everyone I 
talked to."— KA7BTQ 

"Daytime contacts are okay but too bad you coutdn 1 work a station a second time 
it you worked him the night before. "-N7DF. 

Sure entoyed the contest Lots ot stations heard on the band."—WB7FDQ. 
"Super contest f f did better than last year and it sure helps toward my &band WAS 
award. See you again next year."—AK7H. 

"Very enjoyable contest. Amazed at the number of stations on the bend. Ait were 
very courteous, ft was a mat gentleman's contest." — K7SFN. 
"Great contest. Heard a lot of activity from my QTH here in Montana Plenty ot 
QRM,loo."—K7VtC 

"Daytime bonus points should be deleted" — KCBA 

'Had tots ot tun and looking forward to 1983. The contest is defmifety growing each 
year. Thank you. 7V"—N8AKY r 
"S9 power- fine noise throughout the contest*"— W3CV. 









Continued 



7$ Magazine • January, 1983 107 



"A tun. gentlemanly aft a*t Worked maybe 12 carts on 160 the fast 35 years. This 

wee* ems t managed over TOO contacts' '-WD8CRY 

"Sounded like everyone had a great time " — H8HF. 

"42 states worked. Not bad tor a 25-foot nehcaf- wound vertical with only 5 

radfBls."—KC8NK 

"Enjoyed the contest very much. S think it is the best one held on 760.'" — KC8P, 

"Sure enjoyed the contest. Lots and tots of stations were on, t see"—AA8S. 

"Daytime bonus was confusing. Had a great fim^ though. f —K8US, 



'The first 1 60-meter contest ever tor me. f tnvited the Smoke Vatfey ARC over to 

hetp me outr—WWCEM 

"Unbetterable activity this year. 73 has done if agam*"— WBCCMM 

'My first effort on 160-meter contesting, I was realty impressed with the turnout 

Had toads of tun "—KAWitG. 

"Sorry, no US stations heard on the hand. . Just Europeans.' 1 — DFSZDfA. 

"Had a special 160-meter ttcense and heard only Europeans,"— EA3GCN, 

"A very popular contest according to the turnout. Good luck. , '—KH6iJ. 



WORLD 160 METER PHONE CHAMPIONSHIP 
SINGLE-OPERATOR STATIONS 



C*l(»tgn 


State 


W9RE(W) 


IN 


WBLflL* 


WV 


WB3GCG' 


MQ 


WlCF" 


MA 


WD8CRV* 


Ml 


WB&CMM" 


GO 


KJ9D* 


IN 


KCSP 


Ml 


N5JB* 


TX 


NBATft* 


OH 


K9QLL* 


IL 


WHOM' 


KS 


K9RJ 


IL 


KBSHW 


Ml 


N5CG' 


OK 


W3BGN* 


PA 


W9DUS" 


Wl 


KC40V 


TN 


K1MNS" 


NH 


KlLPS* 


VT 


W4TMR' 


NC 


KA7BTQ* 


ID 


KGSTF* 


SO 


W4VKK* 


GA 


W2FJ* 


NJ 


N7DF* 


UT 


N4IN- 


FL 


KABHIG' 


IA 


W5YZ" 


NM 


K4AQO 


FL 


VE1YX* 


NS 


N4MM' 


VA 


K28G* 


NY 


KD4NI 


VA 


KG4W 


VA 


VE2ZP* 


Quebec 


W4P2V 


FL 


K7SFN* 


IMV 


N4AAO 


TN 


N3CQ 


MD 


WB7FDQ i 


AZ 


K7VIC* 


MT 


WA2G2B 


NJ 


NA4D' 


KY 


WBOBF 


OH 


MOAN 


IA 


WAdOPH* 


WA 


K3IXQ 


MD 


VVQHVr 


MN 


AA9S 


OH 


W5GFR 


TX 


K3LQG fc 


DE 


KB:*mi 


PA 


AE5H* 


MS 


vvaicM 


MD 


VP9BO" 


Bermuda 


KML 


OH 


WB4TUO 


TN 


K20WI 


MY 


KCaA 


■Til 


K4CNW* 


SC 


K6ANP" 


CA 


W3AP 


PA 


N8TN 


OH 


WB1CW2* 


GT 


KC5LK 


MS 


VE4WR' 


Manitoba 


W40WJ 


FL 


KCBNR 


WV 


AE3T 


PA 


K2FL 


NJ 


WBiUFL 


tA 



QSO 

1HS 



332 

697 

762 

722 

622 

561 

579 

582 

552 

4S4 

471 

491 

502 

524 

473 

479 

436 

440 

461 

36B 

401 

367 

347 

362 

318 

338 

333 

331 

292 

336 

295 

315 

347 

343 

259 

293 

289 

283 

266 

263 

253 

251 

303 

246 

179 

252 

235 

304 

240 

237 

215 

254 

243 

251 

251 

192 

245 

253 

215 

201 

235 

233 

252 

206 

176 

167 

190 

185 

200 

196 



StJPr, 



Points 



56 


8 


371,580 


57 


13 


350,700 


57 


11 


322.660 


54 


12 


236.280 


55 


6 


234.240 


55 


8 


230.895 


55 


4 


164,670 


55 


5 


169,600 


55 


3 


169,650 


50 


5 


164,640 


55 


3 


160,950 


54 


6 


1 47.600 


56 


4 


14Z500 


53 


3 


138,320 


53 


1 


135310 


45 


4 


135 730 


54 


3 


135,660 


51 


3 


130,140 


52 


3 


120.725 


51 


3 


119.610 


4fl 


6 


117,720 


52 


7 


111,005 


51 


3 


109,030 


53 


4 


106.020 


53 


6 


104.430 


51 


5 


103.880 


49 


12 


101JOO 


52 


3 


93,775 


52 


3 


92.950 


49 


5 


90.720 


47 


11 


88.740 


46 


4 


88,400 


49 


6 


84.075 


49 


3 


78.645 


46 


1 


77 315 


42 


2 


75.900 


49 


7 


74.760 


50 


1 


74,715 


46 


3 


74,460 


43 


3 


73,580 


50 


3 


71.285 


49 


4 


70.490 


51 


3 


69.120 


49 


3 


60.040 


39 


3 


62L73Q 


50 


— 


61.500 


46 


7 


61.410 


47 


1 


60,960 


50 


1 


60.435 


36 


2 


58,140 


41 


5 


56,350 


40 


2 


54,600 


46 


3 


53,410 


40 


l 


52,480 


39 


3 


51.650 


35 


5 


51.200 


38 


2 


51,000 


46 


4 


50,960 


ra 


2 


50,635 


3? 


1 


48.260 


44 


— 


47.300 


42 


3 


45 H 900 


35 


2 


44,955 


37 


1 


44,460 


33 


2 


44,450 


41 


1 


43,680 


49 


— 


43.120 


45 


5 


43,000 


44 


1 


42.750 


42 


2 


41,140 


34 


3 


40,600 


43 


— 


40,140 



W4TWW 


£H# 


W8DN 


OH 


KlNBN* 


ME 


WB70ZM- 


on 


AIOZ 


IA 


WB42PF 


VA 


W4YZX 


NC 


AK7H 


WA 


WASNFtr 


AR 


WA9FTV 


IL 


KC8JH 


OH 


K3SXA/MM 


NV'MM 


K4VFH 


NC 


K1ECK 


wnfK 


K8US 


OH 


K&JZN 


OK 


N9ZA 


CO 


N7AKU 


NV 


WA9RHU 


IL 


ZF2DX* 


Grand Carman 


VE7WJ' 


BC 


VE60U- 


AM 


W3CV 


PA 


VE7ERY 


BC 


WB9LFD/1 


CT 


W4KMS 


VA 


AA4FF 


VA 


MOD 


VA 


W6WBY 


CA 


K6SVT 


OH 


WA2OF0C 


NY 


VE1BPY* 


P£l 


VE20G 


Quebec 


K8A0M 


Ml 


VE2O0 


Quebec 


K9CGO 


IL 


KB8YE 


OH 


W5LFG 


TX 


K2MN 


NY 


W1BB 


MA 


WD6LCD 


Ml 


Wl LUG/4 


VA 


W4HVU 


FL 


W1LOV* 


Rl 


KB«W« 


CA 


WD8MRF 


OH 


VE5XIT 


Sask 


WD6LCN 


Ml 


KB7M* 


WY 


G3XWZ/A* 


England 


K8HF 


OH 


EA6ET* 


Balearic la. 


W06EFU 


CA 


OKiAVG* 


Czech 


W7ABX 


NV 


KB8UO 


Ml 


KB7WN 


WY 


WlGOfcW 


OK 


EA3CCN" 


Spain 


AK7F 


WA 


KJ71 


A2 


K8CV 


Ml 


KA7HB5 


WY 


KH61J* 


Ml 


KA8M5Q 


Ml 


8P6KZ* 


Barbados 


VE7FBS 


BC 


W3ETB 


PA 


N8ASB 


Ml 


KA8ALO 


Ml 


K9GOF 


Wl 



179 
177 

ire 

191 
154 
154 
165 
130 
156 
130 
123 
124 
176 
167 
143 
110 

138 

iie 

62 

110 

127 

92 

100 

119 

109 

126 

112 

105 

tlG 

103 

93 

93 

117 

101 

89 

85 

98 

95 

72 

101 

85 

71 

94 

71 

73 

60 

82 

58 

94 

59 

57 

44 

71 

50 

62 

33 



40 
35 
32 

28 
29 

50 
16 
23 
14 
13 
8 
4 

ON) World Champion for 1982 

Stale/Provinciai/DX Country Champion 



41 


3 


40.040 


39 


2 


36J285 


39 


2 


35.465 


33 


1 


32.960 


41 


1 


32.550 


39 


2 


31.960 


35 


1 


30,680 


42 


A 


30,820 


34 


2 


28,620 


41 


1 


27 H 510 


41 


2 


26,660 


34 


e 


26,400 


30 


— 


26.400 


24 


5 


24,505 


34 


— 


24,310 


43 


— 


23,660 


a 


2 


22,725 


31 


1 


22,400 


35 


1 


21.420 


37 


10 


21,150 


33 


3 


20,160 


30 


1 


19,995 


40 


1 


19,270 


38 


■ — 


19,000 


29 


2 


1SJ55 


31 


2 


18.315 


27 


2 


ia270 


30 


1 


17,515 


32 


t 


17.490 


30 


— 


17.400 


31 


i 


16,640 


33 


2 


16625 


34 


— 


15.810 


27 


— 


15.795 


27 


3 


15300 


31 


2 


14.585 


30 


1 


13,330 


27 


— 


13,230 


26 


1 


13.095 


30 


3 


12,375 


22 


— 


11,110 


23 


1 


10,320 


25 


2 


10.260 


21 


■ — ■ 


10,185 


28 


— 


9.230 


24 


— 


B 780 


26 


— 


7.930 


-it- 

25 


— 


"750 


23 


3 


7,540 


— 


15 


7.450 


23 


— 


6,785 


1 


17 


5.130 


20 


— 


4,600 


— 


12 


4.260 


17 


— 


4,250 


13 


— 


4.030 


20 


— 


3,400 


18 


— - 


3150 


— 


B 


3.120 


13 


1 


2370 


15 


— - 


2.625 


16 


— 


2560 


18 


— 


Z.24G 


15 


— 


2.175 


7 


— 


1,750 


7 


6 


1,495 


10 


— 


1.150 


to 


1 


625 


1 


— 


130 


1 


— 


80 


2 


-^— 


40 



108 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



WORLD TIME 
WATCH 

the first microprocessor watch 
made especially for hams 




24 hr. timer 

microprocessor 
water resistant 

solar assist 

New Low Price 
-$59.95 



The HAM-1 functions include local time, 
world time, (G.M.T. too) count-up and 
count down chronometer, day, month, 
date, alarm and hourly chime. It's ideal 
for log-keeping, DX time conversion and 
10 minute LD- timing. The HAM-1 fea- 
tures a high contrast Seiko display and 
solar cell battery assist. Battery life is 
better than 4 years. The HAM-1 is water 
resistant to 20 meters, the case is 100% 
solid stainless steel and the crystal is 
scratch resistant mineral glass. The HAM- 
1 is rugged and durable and has a 1 year 
warranty. 

2METERAMPUF1ER 
$39.95 




* 2 Watts In, 10 Watts Out • V.S.W.R. 
Protected *Can be Used tor F,M, 8t S.S. 
B* • Led Status Indicators * Low Loss 
SO-239 Connectors * Current Dram Less 
Than 2,5A at 13,6 V.D.C. • Massive 
Heatsmk • Built In T/R Switch 

TEMPO 3-1 UPGRADE KITS 

Upgrade your early Tempo S-1 to cur- 
rent Production Specifications, kits 
include: *450 M.A.M. Battery Pack 

• New Case Assembly • AH New Es- 
cutcheons • Spkr,/Mic. Sack vu/Dust 
Cap • New Earphone & Jack • P.C.8. 
and Parts for Easy Installation • Detailed 
Instruction Manual * For Radios With & 
Without TT. Pad. 

Other Accessories Available: 

Spkr/Mic. Designed for S-1 '!• , . 324.95 

Heavy Duty Belt Clip. . , 7.50 

Flex Antenna , 6,00 

To Order Call or Write to: 

ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS 

INTERNATIONAL -*«8 

2411 Lincoln Avenue 

Belmont, CA, 94002 USA, 

(415) 595-3949 

Add $3.00 per order for shipping & 
handling. California residents add 6% 
sales tax. Visa, Master Charge accepted. 



MDRGfllfJ 



l/2-siic (75M only «*') 

Multi-Band (5, 4, 3 bands) 
80/75M thru 10M 

Broadbandcd * no traps used 

Prices start at $82.50 



Mp^flim) 



THE MOR-GA1N HD DIPOLES are the 

most advanced, highest performance mult* band HF 
dipole antennas available Patented design pfortttes 
length one-half of cnnventional dipoles 50 ohm 
feed on all bands, no tuner or balun required. Can 
be installed as inverted VEE Thousands m use 
worldwide 12 models available including two 
models engineered lor optimum performance for the 
novice bands. The Mor Gam HO dipoles N/F series 
are the only commercial antennas specifically 
designed to meet the operational requirements of 
the novice license Our ] -year warranty is backed by 
nearly 20 years of HO (frpole production experience, 

for detailed 10-page brochure, write or phone 
directly to MOR-GA1N, P.O. Box 329T. 
Leavenworth. Ks. 66048, TeJ. (913) 682-3142 

*-206 



MORGrqlhJ 




4511 HTTY Interface 

for TRS -80 Color 

Computer Owners 

• Slmp]y plug Into Program Pait* slot. 
■ Fo software to load it is in BOM. 

• Split screen features word wrap and 
continuously displays status, 

• Selective calling stores incoming 
messages on casetfce tape. 

» Baudot and ASCII modes. 

• Standard EIA signals to your TU. 

• Complete documentation supplied, 

4S11 HTTY Interface 
•1/1 $160.98 Sttfe 

RinfnF Teeted 6T aasenibled; 90 

L ' Z^4^ k t ^ day warranty; we pay 
SYSTEMS shipping. Masa resl- 

ml it I ^ dents add 6% sales tax. 
., UNO. 'fi, irad€>mark or Tandy Carp 

P O, Box 772, Acton, MA 01720 (617) 264-4251 



DIRECTION 
FINDING? 



fii Hft I N 'tV^TF.M* 



I "I ~f i" 



orf-mc 





* No Receiver Mods 



• High Sensitivity 

• 135-165 MHz Standard flange 

• Mobile, Base or Remote Use 

• Bright LED Display 

• Optional Digital Readout 

• Optional Serial Interlace 

• Kits or Assembled Units 

• 12VDC Operation 
it 90 Day Warranty 



New Technology (patent pending) 
converts any VHF FM receiver 
into an advanced Doppler Direc- 
tion Finder. Simply plug into 
receiver's antenna and external 
speaker jacks. Use any four 
omnidirectional antennas. Low 
noise, high gain for weak signal 
detection Use serial AFSK option 
for remote display or tape record- 
ing data. Kits from $270. Assem- 
bled units and antennas also 
available. Call or write for full 
details and prices. 



♦ DOPPLER SYSTEMS 
•"N 5540 E. Charter Oak 
L^J Scottsdalc, AZ 85254 

♦ (602) 998-1151 



.-425 



**See Ust of Advertisers on page 1 u 



73 Magazine * January, 1983 109 




CALLLEffER 



ONLY 

$s 



HATS 



101 Elm St Suite 4 
Peterborough, NH 034 S 8 



^187 



LINE 1 

LINE Z 
LINE 1 



Hdt5 An ' • H Nytor Mt 

CIRCLE ONE 

Green Blue Red Gold 





1 


















































1 









Of 



— r^ — — i — ' — i — t — i — l — i — i — i — r — i — — t — ' 

^ J 1 J 1 1 1 I I 1 I J 1 1 




Introduced and the talk of the Dayton Hamfesl these AH native and 
Durable Call Letter Hats are just the thing for HamfestK, Held Day, 
contests and Club Activties, Messages are printed by computer and 
can be up to 6 lines of 1 ft small letters, 3 lines of 9 large letters or 
any co hi nation. The Morse Key or your logo takes one large line. 
Discounts for Club orders and Free logo with orders for 12 and up. 
Once your logo is on file with us it is free with any quantity* and 
remember every hat can have a different call or message. 

CALL LETTER 




T SHIRTS 



T-Shirts are Highest Quality 
50/50 Cotton Polyester 



COLOR 

White/Blue Trim White/Red Trim 

Light Blue Tan 

SIZE 
Adult Sm Med Lrge X-Lrge 
Child 2-4 6-8 10-12 14-16 



I 1 My Own Logo i Provide B & W Copy} 



UNE2 

! LINE 3 

I 
I 

LINE 4 

! UNE5 
I 















1 












T 





















— i — r — i — iiiii 



^— ^— 1 1 T T 1 1 I ' 

1 J [ J 1 J 1 




Our comfortable and durable T-Shirts are the finest quality avail- 
able. Make- up your own message, DXCC, WAS, WAC, Hams do rt 
with higher frequency, DX Hound, DX-Peditions, Please QSL and 
any other message. Up to *ix lines of 10 large letters each or up to 
12 tines of 20 small letters each. Discounts for Club orders and 

t FREE logo with orders for 12 or more. FAST MAIL ORDER ! ! 

I 

JCALL LETTER HATS 101 Brn St. Suite 4, Peterborough. NH 03458 



I 
I 

i Name _ 
i 

I 
i 

i 
i 
i 
i 

i 
» 
i 
i 
i 
r 
r 



Address 
City 



State 



Zip 



Card 



ck □ Money Order □ Charge Card P 
_ Exp Date. 



Signature 



fJWM 1UU i.vk 



A od 5 2 To Total F or S h i p pi n g C ha f ges 




Selling 73 Mag- 
azine wilt make 
money for you. Consid- 
er the facts: 
Fact #1: Selling 73 Magazine 
increases store traffic— our dealers 
tell us that 73 Magazine is the hot- 
test-selling amateur radio magazine on the 
newsstands. 

Fact #2: There is a direct correlation between 
store traffic and sales — increase the number of people 
coming through your door and you'll increase sales. 
Fact #3: Fact #1 + Fact #2 = INCREASED SALES, 
which means more money for you. And that's a fact. 

For information on selling 73 Magazine, call 
800-343-0728 and speak with Ginnie Boudrieau, our 
bulk sales manager, Or write to her at 73 Magazine, 

80 Pine St, Peterborough, NH 03458. 




MAGAZINE 

80 Pine Street Peterborough. NH 03458 

800*343-0728 



COMPARE the HAZER™ 
with foldover + telescoping towers 



- ■ 



ef to 
y to 






i 




* Antenna systems mount on Haz&MHaier folio* 
outside of tower - flitse ro tower too or lower c 
ground level 

■ § a fety lot k system on Hm$t operates whi le re «» ng- lowenn g & In 
normal position Never can fail 

* Weight transferred directly to tower Winch cable used only tor 
raising & lowering 

* Will support most antenna arrays up to 20 so 11 

* High quality matertnlB 5 workmanship 

* Safety - speed - convenience - smooth travel 

* Ease to Foal all and use 

■ For Rohn 20 4 25 lower — Other towers on request 
Complete with winch 100 tl. of cable hardware and instruct ions 

HAZER II Heavy alum £279 £5 - Si 7 00 UPS 

HAZER III Standard alum 1199 95 * Sl3 00 UPS 

HAZER IV Heavy gal steel $24995 * $28 QQ UPS 

Specify mast diameter when ordering 

MAP TIN ENGINEERING P O BOX 253 GOONV1LLE MO 65233 



l-AZDEN-i 

PCS-4000 

ADVANCED MICROCOMPUTER 
CONTROL - I* MEMORIES - 
2 5 WATTS * SUPER COMPACT 
142-1SO MHZ • ANY SPLIT* 
- ONf'VEAR WARRANTY - 

ALSO; PCS-300 HT t 

PCS-2300 10M FM, 
accessories, ate- 




if nv, 






FM-2030 

EASY TO OPERATE - SINGLE- 
KhOe TUMI NO - fllT - 10 
MEMORIES - IB WATTE - 
SCAN SAND OR MEMORIES - 
TT MIC. WITH UP'DOWH 
FREQ. CONT - ANY SPLITS 
BEEPS AT MEMORY BAUD 
LIMITS FOR ETES-OFF 
OPERATION 




Special discounts - call for qiioto 
B. G. CARL ELECTRONICS 

1112S Claire Ave. „ Nortnrfdge, CA 9 1328 

Call: 1-213-363-1216 <««v«>m«> * r G y 6 a R n 





^134 



816-882-2734 



A 



110 73 Magazine • January, 



RADIO 




FOR THE NOVICE 

New, updated editions 

of our famous novice 

license study guide and novice study tapes. 




4.W 



■0f-XT 



HtVMi / 



NOVICE 
LICENSE 

STUDY 

KL7GQD Q(J| DE 







brTlPlwttivfl.Danful 
HtftK 



HUE 



• NOVICE LICENSE STUDY GUIDE— by Timothy M. Daniel N6RK. Here is Ihe most up to date novice 
gu>de available It is complete with information about learning Morse Code, has the latest FCC amateur 
regulations and the current FCC application torms. This guide is not a question/answer memorization 
course but rather rt emphasizes the practical aide or geihng, a ham license and putting a station on the 
air. It reflects what the FCC expects a Novice to know without page after page of dull theory The most 
current information still available at last year's price. SG7357 £4.95 * 

• NOVICE STUDY TARES— It you are Jusi getting started m ham radio, you'll find these tapes Indispen* 
saotei This up-to-the-minute revision of Ihe 73 Study Course Is the perfect way to learn everything you 
need to breeze Ihrough the Novice written exam Theory, FCC regulations, and operating skills are afl 
covered, and you'll be amazed ai how fast you learn using these lap&s! 

Once the test is behind you these tapes will go right on being usetul. because they are packed with the 
latest information on setting up your own nam station, and getting on ihe air 

Thousands of people have discovered how easy teaming from cassette can oe — order now and enter 
Ihe fascinating wc-rtd oi ham radio! CT7300 Set of 3— St 5. 95 * 

Scientists have proven that you team faster by Usiencng than by f eadrng because you can play a cas 
setle tape over and over in your spare time— even while you're driving' You get more and more info 
each lime you hear it You can't progress without sottrf fundamentals these three hour long tapes give 
you all the basics you'll need to pass the Novice e*am easily You II have an understanding of the ba 
s*cs whtch will be invaluable to you for the rest o* your bfe? Can you afford to take your Novice exam 
without first i rstenmg to these tapes? 

Special Offer! Both Novice License Study Guide 
and Novice Study Tapes $19,95 Order NF7300. j 

GENERAL LICENSE STUDY GUIDE 

GENERAL LICENSE STUDY GUIDE — By 
Timothy M. Daniel N8RK This is the 

complete guide to the General License. 
Learning rather than memorizing is the 
secret. This is not a question-and- 
answer guide that will gather dust when 
the FCC issues a new test. Instead, this 
book will be a helpful reference, useful 
long after a ham upgrades to General. 
Includes up-to-date FCC rules and an 
application form. Order yours today and 
talk to the world. SG7358 $6.95 

Slvlo Y 




GENERAL 
LICENSE 
STUDY 
GUIDE 

toyTnottnr H Chart* 






Style W 



W'l»Vs/> / 



W2NSD/1 



Style X 



m 



• OSL CARDS— 73 turns out a fantastic series of OSL 
cards at about half the cost of having them done else- 
where because !hey are run as a iMl-in between printing 
books and oiher items in the 73 Pnnt Shop 250 Style 
W-QW0250— for S8.95"; 500 Style W— GW0500 — for 
$13.95*; 250 Style X— QXG250— for SS.95". 500 Style 

* OX05G0 230 Btyta Y— QY0250— tot S8S5 1 ^on 
Style Y— OY0500-for S13.95 * Allow 6-12 wks lor 
delivery 



LIBRARY SHELF BOXES— These sturdy white corru- 
gated, dirt boxes each hold a full year of 73 r Microcom- 
puting or BO Micro. With your order, request self- 
sticking labels for any of the following: 73, Microcom- 
puting, 80 Micro* CO, QST. Ham Radio Personal Com- 
puting, Radio Electronics, interface Age, and flyte. 
Order 1— BXlQOO— for $2.00*: order 2-7— BX2002— tor 
$1.50 each'; order 8 or more— BX1 002— for S1.25 
each'. 



For Your 

Ham Shack 

73 Magazine 
Binders 

• Preserve and protect your collection for a lifetime 1 
Order these handsome red binders with gold lettering 
S7 5Q for 1, 3 for S2l 75, 6 for £42 00 {Postpaid wrthm 
USA. please add $2 50 per order outside USA > Check or 
money orders only, no phone or COD. orders 73 
Binders, P.O. Bom 5120. Philadelphia. PA 19141. 
■NOTE— Aboire address for Bladen only. 



SHOP 



73 

Code Tapes 

any four tapes for 
$15.95! $4.95 each 



"GENESIS" 

5 WPM — CT7305— This ** Ihe beginning tape for people 
who do not know the code at all, It takes them through 
the 2§ tetters. 10 numbers and necessary punctuation, 
complete with practice every step of the way using the 
newest blitz teaching techniques. It is almost mirac 
ulous! In one hour many people— including kidsof ten- 
are able to master the code. The ease of learning gives 
confidence to beginners who might otherwise drop out 

"THE STICKLER" 

ft+ WPM— CT7306— This <s the practice tape fof the 
Novice and Technician licenses. ii is made up of one 
solid hour of code, sent at the official FCC standard {no 
other tape we've heard uses these standards, so many 
people flunk the code when they are suddenly — under 
pressure— faced with characters sent at 13 worn and 
spaced for 5 wpm). This tape is not memonzable T unlike 
the zany 5 wpm tape, since the code groups ^te entirely 
random characters sent \n groups otlive 

"BACK BREAKER" 

13+ WPM-CT7313— Code groups again, at a brisk 14 
per so you will be at ease when you sii down in from of the 
steely eyed government inspector and he starts sending 
you piam language at only 13 per. You need this extra 
margin to overcome the panic which is universal »n the 
test situations When you've spent your money and time 
to take the lest you II thank heaven you had this back 
breaking tape 

"COURAGEOUS" 

20+ WPM— CT7320— Code is whai gets you when you 
go for the Extra class license It is so embarrassing to 
panic out just because you didn't prepare yourself with 
this tape Though this is only one word faster, ihe code 
groups are so difficult that you'll almost fail asleep copy 
ing the FCC stuff by comparison. Users report lhat they 
can t beheve how easy 20 per really is with this fantastic 
one hour tape 

"OUTRAGEOUS" 

2S+ VYPM— CT7325— This is the tape tor that small 
group of overachteving hams who wouldn't be content to 
simply satisfy the code requirements of Ihe Extra Glass 
license It's the toughest tape we've got and we keep a 

permanent file of hams who have mastered it. Let us 
know when you're up to speed and we'll Inscribe your 
name <n 73's CW "Hall of Fame:" 



4 



BACK ISSUES— Complete your collection, many are 
prime* col lectabtes now. classics in the field! A full col- 
lection is an invaluable compendium of radio and elec- 
tronics knowledge' 

73 BACK ISSUE -BEFORE JULY 1980 m 

$ 300 

73 BACK ISSUE JULY i960 THRU OCT 1981 

, ...„ S 3.50 

73 BACK ISSUE NOV 1&81 TO PRESENT 

., $ 3.50 

73 BACK ISSUE— 5 YOUR CHOICE 

... _„„,.,.S1D.7& 

73 BACK ISSUE— 10 YOUR CHOICE 

S16.00 

73 BACK ISSUE— 25 YOUR CHOICE 

S27.00 



73300 

73350 

733 50 P 

73005 

73010 

7302$ 

73125 



73 BACK ISSUE— 25 OUR CHOICE 



S14.00 

Shipping: Please add St. 00 per magazine. Orders of 
ten magazines or twenty-five magazines add S7 50 
per order 



v^. 



* Use the ordar card in this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to; 73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03458, Be sure to include check or 
detailed credit card information. No C.O.D. orders accepted. $1.50 for the first book, £1.00 each additional book for U.S, delivery and foreign surface. For foreign airmail $t0.00 
per book. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. Questions regardl ng your order? Please write to Customer Service al the above address. (Prices subject to change on books not 
published by 73 Magazine.) 

FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



RADIO BOOKSHOP 



r 



HAND BOOKS FOR 
THE HAMSHACK 



THE COMPLETE SHORTWAVE LISTENER'S HAND- 
BOOK, 2nd EDITION by Hank Bennett and Harry L 
Helms. This comprehensive volume contains loads of 
new information from all over the world on the latest 
developments in SWL technology clubs, associations, 
practices and stations A thorough guide lo stations of 
the world by general continental area and frequency is 
Included BK1241 £9 95 

THE TEN METER FM HANDBOOK— by Bob Heif K9EID 
Th»s handbook has been published to help the ten meter 
enthusiast iea*n more about the many methods of con- 
versions and tricks thai are used to make existing units 
work better. Join the great "ttrtkerere' 1 of the world on tan 
FM and enjoy the fantastic amount of tun in communi 
eating with amateur stations worldwide on ten meter 
FM BK1 190 S4.95 " 

THE PRACTICAL HANDBOOK OF AMATEUR RADIO FM 
REPEATERS- by BIM Pasternak WA6ITF (author of 73 
Magazines monthly column 'Looking West"} This is Ihe 
book lor the VHF'UHF FMer r compiled from material 
submitted by over a hundred individuals, clubs, 
organizations and equipment manufacturers* A "must 
have 4 " for your ham shack shell. BKtlflS S12.95.' 



J 




THE 73 TEST 
EQUIPMENT LIBRARY 

VOL II AUDIO FREQUENCY TESTERS- Jam-packed 
with alt kinds of au dk) frequency teal equipment U 
you're into SSa, RTTY, SSTV, etc., this book is a must for 
you . . , a good book for hi-fi addicts and experimenters. 
too!LB73SaSl_95> 



VOL. Ill RADIO FREQUENCY TESTERS- Radio frequen- 
cy waves, the common denominator of amateur radio. 
Such items as 5WR K antenna impedance, line imped- 
ance. RF output, and field strength; detailed Instructions 
on testing these items includes sections on signal gen 
era tors, crystal calibrators, grid dip oscillators, noise 
generators, dummy loads, and much more. 
LB73G1 *t 96/ 



VOL, IV IC TEST EQUIPMENT— Become a trouble 
shooting wizard \ Here are 42 home construction proj- 
ects for building test equipment to work wilh your ham 
station ami In servicing digital equipment. Plus a 
cumulative index lor all Tour volumes for the 73 TEST 
EQUIPMENT LIBRARY L87362S1 25 * 

ALL THREE OF THE ABOVE 
ONLY $4.95 ORDER LB7365 

RF AND DIGITAL TEST EQUIPMENT YOU CAN 
BUILD — BK 1 044— Rf burst, function, square wave gen- 
erators, variable lervgth pulse generators— 100 kHz 
marker, 1 1 and rf sweep generators, audio osc, stiff sig- 
nal injector. 146 MHz synthesizer, diktat readouts tor 
counters, several counters, prescaier, microwave 
meter, etc 252 pages BK1044 is. 95 * 



r 



FOR THE 
CONTESTER 



THE CONTEST COOK BOOK -This book reveals the 
secrets of that elite group of operators who top the list 
when the contest results are published, U contains 
detailed suggestions for ihe i Irst -time contest er as well 
as tips for the advanced operator. Domestic, DX, and 
specially contests are all discussed, complete with 
photographs and diagrams showing the equipment and 
operating aids used by the top scorers. For the serious 
con tester BK7308 $5,96 / 



V_ 




WORLD 
PRESS SERVICES 

i 'f 




f%m wpMrp <«^h^ FW**t4^^w B i rfli fMMMr 



THE 73 TECHNICAL LIBRARY 






THE COMPLETE 

SHORTWAVE 
LISTENER'S 

HANDBOOK- 3- 



HANDBOOK 



TOOLS I. TECHNIQUES FOR ELECTRON iCS-trv A A 
Wicks is an easy to-understand book written for the 
beginning kit builder as well as the experienced hob- 
byist it has numerous pictures and descriptions of Ihe 
safe and correct ways to use basic and specialized tools 
for electronic projects as well as specialized metal 
working tools and me chemical aids which are used in 
repair shops. BK734S&495 • 

BEHIND THE DIAL— This book explains, in detail, 
whafs going on on all Ihe frequencies, from shortwave 
up to microwave. II gives the reader a good Idea of what 
he can find and where to find II, including some of Ihe 
secret stations such as the CIA, and the F.B.I 
Everything is covered short of microwave monitoring 
Anyone interested m purchasing a shortwave receiver 
should have a copy of this book, surveillance, station 
layout consideration, antenna systems, interface, and 
the electromagnetic spectrum, are included, 
BK7307 S4.95 

THE NEW WEATHER SATELLITE HANDBOOK - by Dr 
Ralph E Taggan WB8DGT Here is the completely up- 
dated and revised edition containing all the informa- 
tion on the mosi sophisticated and effective space- 
craft now in oroH. This book serves both the expert 
enced amateur satellite enthusiast and the newcomer 
It Is an introduction to satellite watching, providing all 
the information required to construct a complete and 
highly effective ground station Solid hardware 
designs and ah the instructions necessary to operate 
Ihe equipment are included For experimenters who 
are operating stations, the book details sll procedures 
necessary to modify equipment for the new series of 
spacecraft. Amateur weather satellite activity repre- 
sents a unique blend of interests encompassing etec- 
ttonics. meteorology and astronautics Join ihe privi- 
leged few in watching the spectacle of earth as seen 
from space on your own monitoring equipment. 
BK7383 £6.95 ' 




t^- 



^ 



THE CHALLENGE OF 180-The growth ol amateur radio 
today Is encouraging the use of t60 meters. All the infor- 
mation necessary to get started on this unique band, the 
all-lmportani antenna and ground systems are described 
in detail. Also, how to get on, top-band operating tips, 
top band transmitters, propagation, weather receiving 
equipment, and more are covered in full. The introduc- 
tion contains interesting photos of Slew Pefrys I the 
King of 1601 snack. This reference is useful lo new and 
experienced lop-band operators. BK7309 J4 95 

INTERFERENCE HANDBOOK— by William R Nelson. 
WA6EGG — This timely handbook covers every type of 
HFi problem and gives you the solutions based on 
practical experience Covers interference to TV, radio. 
hi-fi, telephone, radio amateur, commercial and CB 
equipment. Power line Interference is covered in depth 
— how to locate it, cure M. work with the public, safety 
precautions, how to tram RF/I investigators Written by 
an RFi expert with 33 years of experience, this profuse- 
ly illustrated book is packed with practical easy-to- 
undersland information BK1230S8 95 " 

OWNER REPAIR OF RADIO EQUIPMENT— by Frank 
Glass K6RQ. Here's a boo* that will teach you an ap- 
proach lo troubleshooting without a shack full of test 
equipment Written in a narrative. non-rnaihematFcal 
style, it will encourage you to successfully fix your own 
rig problems BO to 90 B * of the time. Even if you don't 
want to tin. you can learn a lot about how things work 
and fall Add to your library and personal expertise. 
BK7310I7 95- 



" Use the order card In this magazine or Itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to; 73 Radio Booksho 

dotal led credit card in formation. No C.O.D. orders accepted. SI .50 tor the first book, $1 00 each additional book for U. 

per book. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery Questions regarding your order? Please write to Customer Service at the above address. (Prices subject to change on books not 

published by 73 Magazine j 



EVERYTHING YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW 
ABOUT AMATEUR TELEVISION, (but were afraid lo ask) 
— By Mifte Sione WBftQGD. This book Is a complete 
guide to setting up your own amateur radio television 
station. It contains — A history, what equipment you 
need, video theory, cameras, recorders, lighting, special 
effects, sound ATv OXing, mobile FSTV, ATV repealers 
ATV groups, building projects, test equipment, dealer di- 
rectory, a cumulative index of over 1 000 articles on ama- 
teur TV and much more This is Ihe new. 19Q2 edition 
From the publishers of Amateur reJevisJon Magazine 
$9.95 BKt 244 



WORLD PRESS SERVICE FREQUENCIES-by 
Thomas Harrington Can't wait to hear the evening 
news, or are you wondering about the news thai you 
&ren"t hearing? Receive by Radio Teletype IRTTY) ail 
the world news and financial happenings Irom the 
world capltols on a 24 hour aday basis. This book gives 
you the frequencies and times ol broadcast of such 
news services as AP> UPI, Reuters. TASS, VOA and 
London Press Also included is an introduction to 
RTTY with information on equipment, antennas, abbre- 
viations—everything you need to get started in RTTY, 
BK1202»7 95* 



SS8 THE MISUNDERSTOOD MODE- by James B 
Wilson. Single Sideband Transmission thousands of 
us use It every day. yet it remains one of the least 
understood facets of amaleur radio. J B Wilson 
presents several methods of sideband generation, am- 
ply illuslraied with charts and schematics, which will 
enable the ambitious reader to construct his own side- 
band generator. A must for the technically-serious ham. 
BK7361 $5 50 * 



PROPAGATION WIZARD'S HANDBOOK- by J. H. 
Nelson. When sun spots riddled the worldwide com- 
munications networks of the 1940s; John Henr> Nelson 
looked to the planets for an answer. The result was a 
theory of propagation forecasting based upon inter- 
planetary alignment that made Ihe author the most re- 
liable forecaster in America today. The book provides an 
enlightened look at communications pasi. present, and 
future, as well as teaching the ad of propagation 
f orec a st ing B K 7302 $6,95" 

• Peterborough NH G3458 Be sure to include checker 
delivery and foreign surface. For foreign airmail $10.00 



FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



"N 



RADIO BOOKSHOP 



ANTENNA BOOKS 



f\ I ■ 

CUBICAL 

QUAD 



■fukk> PCI 




VHF ANTENNA HANDBOOK— The new IrW Antenna 
Handbook details Ihe theory, design, and construction 
of hundreds of diflerent VHF and UHF anlennas. .a 
pracilcal book written for Ihe average amateur who 
lakes |oy in building, not lull of complex formulas for the 
design engineer Packed with fabulous antenna projects 
you can buifd. BK7368SS 95,* 

BEAM ANTENNA HANDBOOK (New 5th edition)— by 
William I Orr & Stuart D Cowan Y agj beam theory, co" 
si ruction and operation information on ware beams. 
SWR curves and matching systems A must for 
settous DXers BKf 197 S5 95 

THE RADIO AMATEUR ANTENNA HANDBOOK— All 
about wire antennas, beams, luners. batuns. coax, 
radials. SWR and towers. Clear and complete informa- 
tion BK 11 99 56,95 

VHF HANDBOOK FOR RADIO AMATEURS-Contains 
Information on FM theory h operation and equipment. 

VHF antenna design and construe I Ion, satelllte-EME, 
and Ihe newest solid-state circuisl. BK] 198 $6.59* 

SIMPLE, LOW-COST WIRE ANTENNAS FOR RADIO 
AMATEURS— AH new data and everything you want to 
Know about low-cost multi-band antennas., inexpensive 
beams, invisible" antennas for hams in "rough" loca- 
tions BK1200$695 




73 DIPOLE AND LONG WIRE ANTENNAS - by Edward 
M Not! W3FQJ. This ts the first collecnon ot virtually 
every type of wire antenna used Dy amateurs. Includes 
dimensions, configurations, and detailed construction 
data for 73 different antenna types Appendices 
describe the construction of noise bridges, line tuners, 
and data on measuring resonant frequency, velocity 
factor, and swr, BK1G16 $5 50/ 

ALL ABOUT CUBICAL QUAD ANTENNAS (2nd edi 
tion) The "Classic on Quad design, , . con- 

struction, and operation Now 2nd echlion contains 
new feed and matching systems and new data BK t 196 
$5* 



r 



HOW TO DEFEND YOURSELF AGAINST RADAR— by Bruce F. Bogner and James R Bodnar. a lawyer and radar 
expert. This book gives you the ammunition to challenge the radar "evidence" that usually leads to a speeding 
conviction. The major part of the book details the inner workings of radar— you'll become more ot an expert than 
most police officers and judges, The remainder of the book outlines how to defend yourself against a speeding 
debet — the observations measures and testimony you must obtain to defend yourself without the help of a 
lawyer The price is a lot less than a fine! BK1201 $6,95." 

MICROCOMPUTER BOOKS 



THE SELECTRIC INTERFACE— by George Young. Vou 
need the Quality print that a daisy wheel primer pro- 
vides but the though i of buying one makes your wallet 
will SELECTRICTm INTERFACE, a step by step guide 
to interfacing an IBM Selecfric VO Writer to your micro- 
computer, will give you that quality at a traction of the 
price George Young, co-author of Kilobaud Microcom- 
puting magazines popular "Kilobaud Kiassroom" 
series offers a low-cost alternative to buying a daisy 
wheel printer. SELECTfllC INTERFACE includes: step- 
by step instructions, tips on purchasing a used Seiec- 
tric, information on various Selectric models, includ- 
ing the 2740, 2980. and Dura 1041, driver software for 
ZBO. 60S0 7 and 6502 chips, tips on interfacing tech- 
niques With SELECTRIC INTERFACE and some back- 
ground In electronics, you can have a high-quality, low- 
cost, letter-quality printer. Petals not Included. BK7388 
StZ.97 

40 COMPUTER GAMES FROM KILOBAUD MICROCOM- 
PUTING— Forty games in nine different categories. 
Games for large and small systems, and a section on 
calculator games Many versions of BASIC used and a 
wnde variety of systems represented A must for the 
serious computer games/nan BK73S1 17 96* 

KILOBAUD KLASSROOM^By George Young and Peter 
Slark. Learning electronics theory without practice isn't 
easy. And it's no fun to build an electronics project that 
you can't use. Kilobaud Kiassroom the popular series 
first published m Kilobaud Microcomputing, combines 
theory with practice. This is a practical course in digital 
electronics. It starts out with very simple electronics 
projects, and by the end of the course you'll construct 
your own working microcomputer! BK 7386 $14.95 

HOBBY COMPUTERS ARE HERE! If you want !o come 
up to speed on how computers work— hardware and 
soflware— this is an excellent book H starts with fun- 
damentals and explains the circuits and Ihe basics of 
programming, along with a couple of TVT construction 
projects, ASCII, Baudot, etc. This book has the highest 
recommendations as a teaching aid, BK7322 $2 47 



TEXTEDIT — A Complete Word Processing System in 
kit form— by Irwin Rappaport. JE X TEDI T is an Inexpen- 
sive word processor that you can adapt to suit your 
needs, from writing form letters to large texis If is writ- 
ten in modules, so you can load and use only those por- 
tions that you need. Included are modules that perform 
right justification, ASCII upper. lowercase conversion, 
one-key phrase entering, complete editorial functions, 
and much more 1 TEXTEDIT is written m TRS-MT Disk 
BASIC, and the modules are documented in the 
author s admirably clear tutorial writing style. Not only 
does Irwin Rappaport explain how to use TEXTEDIT: he 
also explains programming techniques implemented 
in the system TEXTEDIT is an inexpensive word pro- 
cessor that helps you learn about BASIC program* 
ming. It le written for TRS-80 Models 1 and III with TRS- 
DOS 2.2/2,3 and 32K. # TRS-B0 and TRSDOS are Irade- 
marks of the Radio Shack Division ol Tandy Corpora- 
lion, BK7387 $9 97 



SOME OF THE BEST FROM KILQBAUD/MlCROCOM 
PUTING— A collection of the best articles that have 
recently appeared in Kilobaud MICROCOMPUTING 
Included is material on Ihe TRS^BO and PET systems. 
CP/M, the 8080V8086VZ80 chips, the ASR 33 terminal. 
Data base management, word processing, text editors 
and fife structures are covered too. Programming tech- 
niques and hardcore hardware construction projects 
for modems, high speed cassette interfaces and TVTs 
are also included in this large format. 200 plus page 
edition BK73H $10,95" 



THE NEW HOBBY COMPUTERS— This book takes up 
from where "HOBBY COMPUTERS ARE HERE!" leaves 
off. with chapters on Large-Scale Integration, how 
to choose a microprocessor chip, an introduction 
to programme no, low-cost I/O for a computer, com- 
puler arithmetic, checking memory boards... and 
much, much more! Don't miss this tremendous value! 
BK7340 QnJy S247. 



COOK BOOKS 



TTL COOKBOOK -by Don Lancaster. EMplains what 
TTL is, how it works, and how to use it Discusses prac- 
tical applications, such as a digital counter and dis- 
play sysiem. events counter, electronic stopwatch, 
digital voltmeter and a digital tachometer. 
BKf 0*3 5950." 

CMOS COOK BOOK -by Don Lancaster Details the 
application of CMOS the low power logic family 
suitable for most applications presently dominated by 
TTL Required reading for every serious digital ex- 
perimenter' BKlOu $10 50 * 

TVT COOKBOOK — by Don Lancaster Describes the 
use of a standard television receiver as a micropro- 
cessor CRT terminal. Explains and describes charac- 
ter generation, cursor control and interface informs 
tlon In typical, easy to-understand Lancaster style. 
BK1064S995.' 

IC OP-AMP COOKBOOK— by Walter G. Jung. Covers 
not only the basic theory of the IC op amp in great 
detail, but also includes aver 250 practical circuit ap- 
plications, liberally illustrated. 592 pages. SV> xflVi. 
softbound BKt028$t4 95 ' 



THE WELL 

EQUIPPED 

HAM SHACK 



lam c RAd«> 



<u6rld 




c/jlI JLrf/i<^ 






■ 



- 






WORLD REPEATER ATLAS— Completely updated, over 
230 pages of repeater listings are indexed by location 
and frequency. More than 50 maps pinpoint 200D repeat- 
er locations throughout the USA. Foreign listings in- 
clude Europe, the Msddie East, South America, and 
Africa. BK7315S2 00 



THE MAGIC Of HAM RADIO— by Jorrold Swank 
WBHXR, Under various callsigns. WBHXfi has been 
heard on the ham bands since 1919. He has watched 
amateur radio grow from Ihe days of Model A spark coils 
to an era of microprocessors and satellite communica- 
tions. Jerry has responded to calls for help from earth- 
quako-siriekn Managua and tornado-ravaged Xenia Ant- 
arctica, one of mana loneliest outposts, nas been a bit 
less lonely, thanks to Jerrys tireless phonepatching ef- 
forts Drawing on his own colorful experiences and 
those of many other hams. Jerry hes compiled thte word- 
picture of ham radio during the past six decades. 
BK7312S4 95 

A GUIDE TO HAM RADIO— by Larry Kahaner WB2NEL 
VUhal's Amateur Radio all about? You can learn the 
basics of this fascinating hobby with Ihis excellent 
beginner's guide. 11 answers the most frequently asked 
questions in an easy-going manner, and it Shows the 
best way to go about getting an FCC license A Guide to 
Ham Radio is an ideal introduction to a hobby enjoyed 
by people around Ihe world BK7321 $4.95.* 

WORLD RADIO TV HANDBOOK 1982, 25TH EDITION 

—This book Is Ihe bible of international broadcasters. 
providing the only authoritative source of exact Informa- 
tion about broadcasting and TV stations world wide. 
This 1961 edition is completely revised, giving com- 
prehensive coverage of short, medium and long wave. 
560 pages of vital aspects ot world listening 
BKn84f 16.50 



'Use the order card in this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mail to 73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 03458. Be sure to include check or 
detailed credit card in'ormation. No CO D. orders accepted. *T50 for the first book, $1.00 each additional book for U-S delivery and foreign surface For foreign airmail $10.00 
per book Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery Questions regarding your order? Please write to Customer Service at the above address. ^prices subject to change on books not 

P " Wi5h6d6,73MW FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 



ADVERTISERS 



R S. No, 



Page 



H. S. No. 



Pag* 



115 

164 

448 

124 
476 

■ 

20 

* 

5 

4$3 

35* 



AEA/Advanced Electronic Applica- 
tions 4 N 30.75 T 9ai2l,131 

A5ATVMag**me ........ 14S 

A AW Productions . .. 8fi 
Advanced Communtcalions Inter- 
national ,.., 109 



+ ■ * P 4 



Advanced Computer Controls 
Advanced Computer Controls 
Alaska Micro wave Labs .... 
All Electronic a Corp, . . 
Amateur Electronic Supply 
Amateur Wholesale Electronics 

53,73 

Amateur-Wholesate Electronics 



29 

96 
146 
.1* 



Dayton Hamvenhon ... . 3ft, B1 

• DGM Electronics, Inc. 72 

Dlgi Com Engineering, Irrc ..... 121 

57 Discount Ham Radio , 77 

425 Doppter Systems 109 

453 EGE.inc. 133 

146 Electronic Rainbow Industries, Inc. 

23 

477 Electronic Rainbow Industries. Inc, 

. . . . , ■ 126 

Elect revalue Industrial, Inc. .... , 146 

479 Eneon 143 

400 Engineering Consulting Service 

146 



1B6 

130 

• 

11 
305 
439 
157 

187 
92 

m 

150 
382 



15 

184 

152 

21 

106 

346 



A meek. Inc. 

A. P. Systems 

Associated Rad*0 

Alomtronics 

Aulo Connect . . . . ... 

Autek Research 

BGCarl Electronics 

Barker & Williamson, Inc. 

Barry Electronics Corp, . . . , 31 



Ben Franklin Electronics , . . 

Soman Industries 

Butternut Electronics Corp. 

Call Letter Nats 

Ceco Communications, Inc 

Clutteffree Modular Consoles . . 

Commtek 

Commurncatrons Concepts, Inc 

Communications Design , 

Communications Specialists 



22 Pair Radio Sales .145 

.74 &5 Fai scan, inc .74 

123 323 Fox-Tango Corp. 80.96 

137 178 Galaxy Electronics 145 

119 * G liter Shortwave .......... 97 

129 143 GL& Electronics 51 

131 417 Gotham Antenna 77 

110 195 Goldsmith Scientific Corp 66 

.98 132 Grand Systems 148 

86 H A R Communications . . . 96 

Hal-Tronlx T ......*. ► . „ „ . . * . . . 61 

Hal Communications .... 15,89 

Mam Radio Outlet , ...3 

Hamtronics, NY 158, 159 

HandiTeK .146 

hfoosier Electronics . 98 

Hustler, inc.- 11 

ICOM . . . .. Gov. IL 143 

137 78 Independent Crystal Supply .... 146 
..47 445 Instant Software 

Amateur Radio Program . , . . . 139 
9,Bi 165 Integrated Electronics Unlimited 



.125 
.27 
.119 
110 
121 
119 
125 



31 

33 

460 

320 



Contemporary Electronics Products 

144 

CQ Products 74 

Crown Micro Products 119 

Current Development Corp. ..... 61 

Cushcraft Corp 97 

Data Service Co. < . 144 



125 

36 international Crystal 125 

39 JanCrystals 97 

1Z J DL Industries 36 

354 Jensen Toots, inc. 145 

Kant ionics. Inc. 99 

81 KDK Distributing Comp, Inc 76 



*j* •!•»*■ *y «J* *jt *J +J» *j# **++J' ♦■J**!* *£* v <5* *I* *5* **• 




C at * iog» 



Price Catalog* 



item 



rupc 


SAC* tSSUE - B|fO**E JUlt tfg0 




f - 


nssa 


K iSSUt - JUif i960 THRU 




OCT 1QSI i INI! 


rwsw» 


73 SACK ISSUE - NOV «9ti 1 U> MHt St N 1 






t$m 


n Bach issut -b roun GhO« 




si u r.i 




Aitil VI DO prtr TOQfUmi M< snipping 


?3ci l'j 


H BACR IS&UI r0 ¥0UR CHOI 




ttft.DO 


r$XK 


4ACft iSSUf - » »0Ufl CHOtCf 




arm 




n SACW ISSUE ^1% OUR ChOjC* 






4 


fc*tf 1/50 ps» o» *«« i.v Wvpptng 



* ALL ABOUT CUIMCA4. QUAD AN t"E NNAS 

I 595» 
BttDM ANNOTATED BA" L 1 111*95 

mm$ AMNOfAIEU BASIL tfOL2 tlOEH 

BKHU? BEAM ANTENNA WAtJOflOOK 1*95 

BK? IG7 BEHIND I HI DlAl I - I 



anno* c« allEmge Of tee 

SKID" CAAOS COOKaOOH 

CTZXIS CODE TAP£-swpii 

CT73M COOE TAPE -4- ««* 

CT73I3 CODE TAPE- TJ - lAiPA* 

CTtJZO COOt tApE-20 - rtPM 

CT7J2S CODE UFE-25* WPM 

CT739* GOfJt T A PES i A N ¥ F OU« ABOV Q 

bki^4i rwE complete shofttwa VI 

LISFENEHS HftN^JBCOK 
BKJMB THE CONTEST CQOK&UiiK 
BhTiHi «0COMPUT£ROAM| 

M* EVE n* tHING *OU AL W A 1 * 5 W AN T | 
* HOW/ ABOUT AMATEUR TV 
0*7321 A GJJIOE TO HAU HAOJO 
BK/122 HOeavCOAlPUTEHSAAE M£RE 

a>i now to dcfe.no tOU«SCtf aga« 
MOM 
B^KUt lCOPAJkffPCOO*aOOK 

iN'tWEflENCE NANDBOOK 
BMJ«r KiLOSAUP KlASSPOOM 
BK. O i 7 MAGIC OF r| AW H ACHO 
B^niD t Hi- N| W HOBO r COM PU T t RS 

BIV7JS3 THE fitVY WEATHFRSAitLLiTE 

HANDBOOK 
CT73CKJ NOVICE THEOPlV f APES 



* Please contact these advertisers directly. 

To receive full information from our advertis- 
ers please complete the postage-paid card. 



n.S. No, Page R S No. Pag« 

* Kenwood ( 7,Cov.lV Moving 136 

KLM Electronics . . ... 75 Subscriptions 97, ?35, i3fi 

204 tacombe ...^ UnrversltyMtcrofllrns 97 
452 L^wisCooBlnjctiofiCO- ' V. 1Z3 * SimpleSimon Electronics Kits 37 
77 M-Souarea Enginewifig, inc . . 121 *86 Simpson Electric Co. .142 

44 Macrotrontcs. inc . ..-43 112 SlrrtecCo, ,39 

45 Madison Electronics 90 ^ 7 5le P Electronics 144 

134 Martin Engineering 110 Spectfonics . . . I37 r 160 

205 Metheny Corp 145 68 Spectrum Communications 82,83 

478 Metheny Corp , t . . .128 *36 Spectrum International. Inc 76 

47 MFJ Enterprises .35, 1S9. 131 f 133 198 SpeedcaH Corp .39 

48 MHi Electronics 148-157 69 Surplus Electronics 145 

50 Mlcrocrafi Corp. 96 

51 Microlog 45 ^^g Tayco Communications 125 

196 Microtek ............. — 145 - Telex Communications 17 

487 Midi an Electronics . ... 142 • Ten-Tec, Inc. 67 

MirageCommunFcelions 91 170 TET Antenna Systems 74 

206 Mor-Gam 109 • fbe Antenna Bank , 38 

318 Na«ionatComm.GroupCo....^78 118 The Biacksburg Group . . .59 

481 National Mlcrotecn .... 142 449 Tne Ham Shack 133 

412 Nemal Electronics .115 57 The Tuned Anlenna 55 

137 Nuts & Volts * 146 * Thermal Corp .137 

Orbit Magazine 59 aog Tokyo Hy-PowerLabs, Inc 10 

P C. Electronics 66 104 Trionyx Industries 51 

Paiomar Engineers 4, 90,142 434 Trtpp-Llle 143 

159 Parsec Communications 145 197 Twin Oaks S Associates. . .30 

201 Pegasus Electronics l nd -96 ■ Universal Communications 50 

182 Peterson Electronics .148 • Universal Electronics 28 

485 PolyPnase/Cofiy 143 189 Uraversal Sottwaie .77 

Pronam Electronics 36 • v-J Products Jnc . 66 

191 RroSearch Etectronics 5 408 Vanan Assoc fates -2 

61 Radio Amateur Cafibooh. Inc 11 * Van Gorden Engineering 11 

397 Radto World .. . ,. 115 311 Vanguard Labs 145 

62 Ramsey Electronics 147,161 Viking industries 47.117 

147 Randall Sherman 96 90 VoCom Products 144 

156 RF Electronics ,.,,,.,,,..... 51 200 Votuc Communications 47 

171 Ridge Systems Co. Jnc. ...,. ..109 480 W9 A V {Code Translator) 143 

133 Rivendel I Associates .123 * W9!NN Folded Uniroid Antennas 

207 Ruse Software Ltd 148 144 

66 S-F Amateur Radio Services ... ,55 302 W-S Engineering 80 

500 73 80 Western Radio Bectromcs 80 

Books . . . . . . . 97, 1 1 M 14. 136^ 141 154 Weslland Electronics ... 129 

Dealer Ad ......110 83 Yaesu Etectronics Corp Covin 




£■**■ *j»+3* tj**!* *3* #j#»j»+**»***j* *,**** ^* , ****I* ^Sr 



To order, complete the postage-paid card, or itemize 
your order including detailed credit card informa- 
tion or check and mail to: 73 Magazine/Mai! Order 
Dept./Peterborough NH 03458, 



Price Catalog" 



Item 



Price Catalog* 



Hem 



Price 



t 4» 


9*T3r& 


"O 




I *ifc 


S*tiB5 


£ i 




S *» 


Sk nre 


t 4S* 




f 4« 


OWOJ50 


*if>i»5 


OW0WII 




Qm\>'.>u 


$ 99b 


QX0WXI 


saw 


DV023 ■ 


i ?^ 


OVLftOO 


ED TO 


eKtige 


t *#es 




S 4 9S 


BMW* 




B*HJ*ft 


i itt 




ii* » 


axitet 


% •« 


BXtDCe 


tHV. 


BK12D0 


% * '■■ 




* ?J. r 


UKOIl 


* a« 


9K7351 


1V|"J5 


SQ/J.^. r 



ovvNcn ntPAifl o* r*dw iouiP*»fN • 

I kCAL HANDdOO* Of- FW 

PBTJC'ACjA : .ON UVIZAHD & MAUO&OO*- 

^flDS-STYLb ft /SO S «a*> 

-AHDi-iTrl I W -iW Si J 95 

QSL CARDS -SIYLL * 2&D 1 a 95 

Oei CAHDS --YI I- K-«0 HIM 

CARDS SltfLE t^i&O i KM 

QSt CAHD$ SmtV-ieO SU95 
r»*t RADIO MNAllbMANTEMNM 

HAAtOOOfJK S 6 9S 

«tf A DIG) T 4L TEST ECXWPMt MF | J Jfi 

^K*lE A LONC rt»Rt A»*TE*iMA£ 

S 5% 

SJ4EI.F aoi S iOD 

-f lOM£S— 3 llSDeHcai 

SH£tf BQAES— S ANP UP H A ♦■ ■ 

SIMPLE lOWCO^TWiFtt AMIENHAS 
FQflnAOlOAMAlCuRS 1 6 95 

SOMi- III THE SE5T trow ML OflAUD 

tiosa 

BSttTHtWlSUNDEHSlOODMOni- s 5W 
'.l.i[»Y(jUIQE-t*OVIC6CL*SS 5 i 95 



t» STUOimwMK =-<tflAiCt 

^ANaeooA t *95 

i*T JfiO I ESI EOUIP LIB VZ-AUUMJ TEST Efts 

I i95 
IB73S1 ItSl ttiU'K lib-,'}— DABiUFOLJif f 4 95 
i 6?'JbJ TE5I EQUIP EIB V*-lC TEST feO * 4» 
BKlTja? TEStEOl I WOflD PRDCESVJNO Klf 

osraa? texTEdti uif.r iw.ar 

HK^MH TOClLh A in. UNIQUES t * 95 

Hi- "ft.! JT^ UJOKBOQK I 3 XI 

hhic»4 tvt LOnxnod* i 9 95 

- ii? UNDERSTANDING & PROGRAMMING 

MICROCOWU T fc HS .» 95 

BlinSt ■ NN* nAKfOeoOA t 545 

SHI I&. VHP HANUftUC* POR RAO«0 AAAA1EURS 

H^ffi «VOH4D l»RESS SEflMCE «*FOur 

I ?% 
UllM WOffLORAUtOTVHANIDaO USSft 

BKMIS VlfOflLDf4tPEATEflATLA& i .«] 



SHIPPING AND HANDLING CHARGES 11 50 <»i lit* 

'Hal LuOH. SI rt" Piinn jiirjilianal tinuh Hh US delivfifv 
,iim| ror E ign wrttct tlUpei &(»* 'm li>rwnjri iirmsH 






114 ?3 Magazine • January, 1983 



SOCIAL EVENTS 



Listings in this column are provided free of 
charge on a space-available basis. The foh 
towing in formation should be included in 
every announcement: sponsor, event, date, 
time, place, otty. state, admission charge (if 
anyl features, talk-in frequencies* and the 
name ot whom to contact tor further informs 
tton Announcements must be received at 73 
Magazine by the first of the month, two 
mtxnths prior to the month m which the event 
takes place. Matt to Editorial Offices. 73 Mag- 
azlne, Pine Street, Peterborough NH 03458. 

SOUTH BEND IN 
JAN 2 

A ham rest swap & shop wit! be held on 
Sunday, January 2. 1983, at Century Center, 
downtown on US 33 One Way North be- 
tween the SI. Joseph Bank building and the 
river, South Band IN. Tables are S3.00 each 
in a carpeted, half-acre room. The Industrial 
History Museum Is in the same bulldmg. 
Four-lane highways lead to the door from 
all directions Talk-in on 52^ 52. 99/39. 
93/33, .78/10, m09. 145.43, and 145.29. 
For more information, contact Wayne 
Werts K9IXU, 1689 Riverside Drive, South 
Bend IN 46616. or phone (2l9)-233-5307 

WESTALLIS W1 
JAN 8 

The Wesi aids Radio Amateur Club will 
hold its IT In annual Midwinter Swapfest 
on Saturday. January 8, 1983. beginning at 
fl 00 am, a I the Waukesha County Exposi- 
tion Center Tickets are $2 00 in advance 
and $3.00 al the door Tables are $2,00 in 
advance and $3.00 al I he door. For ad- 
vance reservations, send an SASE to 
WARAC. PO Box 1072. Milwaukee WI 
53501 

OAK PARK Ml 
JAN 9 

The Oak Park Amateur Radio Club will 
hold Its annual Swap 'n Shop on Sunday, 
January 9. 1983. from 0:00 em to 300 pm. 
at Oak Park High School, southwest cor- 
ner of Cool id pe and Oak Park Boulevard. 
Oak Park ML There will be ample parking 
and refreshments. Talk in on 14652. For 
prepaid table reservations, write OPARC. 
14300 Oak Park Boulevard, Oak Park Ml 
48337. 

RICHMOND VA 
JAN 16 

The Richmond Amateur Telecommuni- 
cations Society win hold Richmond Frost- 
fest '03, (he annual winter ham radio and 
computer show, on Sunday, January I6 r 
I983 r at the slate fairgrounds, Richmond 
VA General admission >s 54 00. All flea- 
market and commercial exhibit spaces 
wrll be indoors m a BOiXJO-square-tool ex- 
hibit building. 

SOUTHFIEID Ml 
JAN 30 

The South-field High School Amateur 
Radio Club will hold their 18th annual 
Swap A Shop on January 30. 1983. from 
800 am to 300 pm. at Southfieid High 
School. 24675 Lahser, South fie Id Ml 
Doors will open at &.00 am for exhibitors. 
Admission is S3 50 Reserved tables 
(payable In advance) are $18 00 lor two 
B loot tables and S9 00 lor each additional 
reserved table. Tables aJso will be 
available al the door There will be food 
and parking. All profits go toward elec- 
tronics scholarships and to support the 

-'See List of Advertisers on page tt4 



activities of Southhetd High School's 
amateur radio club For more information 
Or reservations, write Robert Younker. 
Southfieid High School, 24675 Lahser, 
Southfieid Ml 48034, or phone 
I313V354 7372 from 8 00 am to 10:30 amor 
(313)^354-0210 from 10 30 am lo 300 pm 
Monday through Friday 

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS IL 
FEB 6 

The Wheaton Community Radio Ama- 
teurs will bold their hamfest on February 
6. 1983, at Arlington Park Race Track Expo 
Center, Arlington Heights IL Tickets are 
S3 00 at the entrance and $2 50 m ad- 
vance. Doors wiH open at 3:00 am. Flea 
market fables are free and plenty of floor 
space wiH be available There will be a 
large commercial area (including a com- 



puter section), awards and clear, paved 
parking Talk-in on 146 01'-61 and 146.94, 
For general information, call W9JTO at 
f3T2>23 1-9524 For advance tickets, send 
an SASE lo WCRA, PO Box QSL. Wheaton 
IL 60187 

MANSFIELD OH 
FEB 13 

The AflflL-apptOved Midwinter Ham- 
lest/Auction will be held on Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 13, 1983. beginning at 3:00 am. at the 
Richland County Fairgrounds, Mansfield 
OH, Tickets are 12.00 in advance and 
S3 00 at the door Tables are 55.00 In ad- 
vance and $6.00 at the door. Half tables 
are available Talk in on 146.34/ 94 For ad- 
ditional information or advance tickets, 
contact Harry Frreichen KBHF. 120 Home- 
wood Road, Mansfield OH 44906, or 
phone (41ty-529-2801 or (419J524-1441. 

MARLBOROUGH MA 
FEB 20 

The Algonquin Amateur Radio Club will 
hold its annual flea market on Sunday. 
February 20, 1983. at Ihe Marlborough Jr. 
High School, Marlborough MA, Admission 



is $1.00 and children under 12 will be ad- 
mitted tree, The doors Witt open at 9:00 am 
for dealers and 10:00 am for buyers Re- 
freshments wrfi be available, Tables re- 
served before February 12 r 1983, are $7 ,00; 
any remaining tables will be $10,00 at the 
door, Talk -in on 14G.0V.61 and 146.52 For 
table reservations or more information, 
contact Algonquin ARC, PO Box 258, 
Marlborough MA 01752- 

GLASGOW KY 

FEB a 

The Glasgow Swapfest will be held on 
Saturday, February 26, 1983, beginning at 
8:00 am Central time, an he Glasgow Flea 
Market Buiidrng.2miies south of Glasgow 
just off highway 31 E. Glasgow KY Admis- 
sion is 12,00 per person. There is no addi- 
tional charge for exhibitors. The first table 
per exhibitor will be free, and extra tables 
writ be available for $3 00 each. There will 
be a large heated building, tree parking, 
tree coffee, and a large flea market. Talk 
■n on 146.341.94 ot 147.631.03. For further 
information, write Bernie Schwitzgebel 
WA4JZO 121 Adatriand Court. Gtasgow 
KY 42141 



I 



04 Ml 



CENTRAL NEW YORK'S MOST COMPLETE HAM DEALER 






ICOM IC t?0 



KENWOOD r5B305 



ROBOT BOO 



DH4KE in? OP' 



VAESUrTJO? 



Featuring Kenwood. Yaesu, loom, Drake, Ten-Tec, Swan, Dentron, Alpha. Robot, 
MFJ, Tempo, Astron, KLM P Hy Grain, Mostey, Larsen t Cushcraft, Hustler, Mini 
Products, Bird T Mirage, Vlbroplex, Bencher, Info-Tech, Universal Towers, 
Can book, ARRL, Astatic, Shure, Collins, AEA. We service everything we sell! 

Write or call for quote. You Won't Be Disappointed. 
We are just a few minutes off the NYS Thruway ((-90) Exit 32 



OUT OF STATE 
ORDEH TOLL FREE 

800-448-9338 



ONEIDA COUNTY AIRPORT TERMINAL BUILDING 
ORISKANY. NEW YORK 13424 



h \ R#s Call i J i S ti H6-0184 



NEMAL ELECTRONICS 

COAXIAL CABLE SALE 



^387 



Warran - K2IXN 

Bob- WA2MSM 

A1-WA2MSI 









rf* 



7v, ■ 






/ 



POLYETHYLENE DIELECTRIC 
RG2I3 ni>n contaminating 95% sheild mil spec 36c/ft 
RG174/U mil spec % c » shield lOc/ft 

RG11U 96* » shield. 75-ohmmttspec £5c/»t 

RGflU96% shield, mil spec S27.95HOO H w 31crfT_ 

RG6A/U doutHe shield, TSehm 25cJft, 

RGSOAU stranded mji spec I2c/tl 

RG5S mil spec. 96% shield f 1c/fi 

LOW LOSS FOAM DIELECTRIC 
RG8X95% shield (black, white or gray] 51 4,95/tOO rt. 



RG8U B0% shield 

RG5BU 80*-* shield 

RG58U95 8 * shield 

RG99U 100- * toil shield, TV type $7/100 It 

RGSU97 e « shield 11 ga tequrv 8etdeft82i4) 

Rotor Cable Scon 2 18 ga, 6-22 ga 



17*m. 
Iflcfft. 

07«ffl. 

10cm. 

lOc/tt 

31«ffl- 

19*/IL 



RG6U-20 ft., PL 259 ea end S4.95 

RG214U dbl silver shield, 50 ohm . SU5M. 

100 h RG8U with PL 259 on each end Si 9. 95 

BELQEN Coax in 100 It rolls 

RGS0UJ92O1 SI1J5 

Grounding strap, heavy duty tubular braid 
3/16 in. tinned copper t0e/ft 

3/B in tinned copper 3-Oe'ft. 



CONNECTORS MADE IN USA 

AmpheooJ Pi-259 79e 

PL 259 push on adapter shell 10.'S3.69 

PL 259 a SO 239 10JS5.69 

Double MaleGonnecloT Si. 79 

PL 259 Ooubie Female Connector 9Sc 

1 tl patch cord w'RCA type plugs each end 3r$1 .00 

Reducer UG 175 or 176 10/31-99 

UG255|PL25910BNC) S350 

Elbow |M359>,, , ..S1.79 

F59AfTV twpej .. .. . 10/S2.15 

UG 21D/U Amphenol Type N Mate lor RG8 S3.00 

BNCUGSBC^U. malf ST25 

3r 16 inch Mike Plug lor Collins etc Si ,2S 

(JG273 BNC to PL-259 S3 00 

FREE CATALOG 

COD add 51 50— FLA. Res add S% Sales Tax 



Connectors— shipping 10% add'l, 2,50 minimum 

Cable -shipping S3 00 1 st TOO ti $2 00 each add I i DO ti 



t*4\2 



1327 NE 119th Street. Dept. RLO. No. Miami, FL 33161 Call (305) 893 3924 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 115 



LETTERS 



FIGHT CITY HALL 



OK, Wayne. I've sal here every mont h and 
read how you think that the code require- 
ment is hindering the growth of amateur 
radio. I think you are mlssi rig a problem fac- 
ing amateur radio that Is much bigger than 
a coda requirement, The problem that I am 
referring to Is local ordinances ihai restrict 
or prohibit amateur towers and antennas 

I can only imagine the number ol hams 
who have worked hard to upgrade and feel 
that now is the time to put up thai dreamed 
of antenna system only to have their local 
government say Ms illegal, so lake It down. 
Why upgrade anymore? in tact, why even 
continue on with ham radio? II Is truly 
disheartening to be told not to practice your 
hobby to its ultimate limit and enjoyment. 

Believe me, fighting city hall ts no fun 
(well maybe a fitUe fun when you win). I 
speak from experience, in my city, Cemtos. 
California, it took about 2 years Of fighting 
city hall to get our ordinance changed Led 
by George Goumas N6AWF, we outlasted 
our city officials by getting to meetings at 
7:00 pm and often not being able even to be- 
gin our presentation as to why our ordi- 
nance should be changed until 1:00 or 2:00 
am Well, our perseverance paid oft with a 
new ordinance that allowed us to go to 70 
feet with a conditional use permit. 

Wayne, if it had not been for many out-of- 
town hams who came and heipod to fill up 
the council chambers, we would never have 
made it Of the tOO-plus hams in our city, 
only a handful were interested enough to 
come Out for our hearings, It was the back- 
ing ol the out -oM owners that saved our bot- 
toms 

l applied for the first permii under the 
new ordinance, ll was granted after a two 
hour discussion with neighbors who claimed 
I was causing | hem continuous Interfer- 
ence A well kept Jog book blew that argu- 
rneni away. I really thought that my permii 
was to end up on the scrap ptie after a 
t37- signature petition against me was pre- 
sented to the council for a number of rea- 
sons that I won't go into, it had no effect. 

From these experiences I have come to 
some conclusions that I would like lo share 
with all amateurs. Fir si of alt, most of you 
don't care about what is going on around 
you unlil it hits you square in the face. 
Amateurs need to light for their property 
rights as home owners I have a little 
50' x tOO* piece of property that I'd like to 
call mine, but it is never mine when I have 
people telling me I can't practice a hobby 
that's not noisy or harmful lis a lot easier 
to keep restrictive laws of f the books lhan It 
is to change existing laws. Each amateur 
should make it his (or her) business to keep 
tabs on what is going on in his city, Finally, 
don't assume thai because the guy a mile 
away has up a tower and antennas that 
there are no laws against it in your city, it 
may be 1 hat no one has complained to the 
city so they jusi haven t taken the time lo 
lell The amateur to remove it 

Wayne, as much as I dislike fighting with 
my local government, I'll never stop fight- 
ing. It looks as i 1 1 will be moving in Lhe next 
year so (hat I will probably have to go 
through the permit process again Local 
governments are slowly talung away our 
personal freedoms, If you don't believe it 
just check to see whai kinds of no-nos are 
on your local government's books. These 



ordinances will range from what color you 
are allowed to paint your house to what you 
are allowed lo park in your driveway. Be- 
lieve me. restrictive anl anna ordinances am 
becoming more of a widespread problem 
than you will ever know and are certainly 
more of a problem than a code tesl. 

Caret Green KK8V 
Carritos CA 

PS Since writing you this letter* our city is 
trying to pull the wool over our eyes again. 
They have decided to take the new ordi- 
nance and put i\ back into the Planning 
Commission for further study. So tar 
through all of I his, we have received no 
League backing. It the ARRL won't help us 
this time Ihnn I suspecl that 100'plus 
amateurs in this city will no longer have any 
reason tor belonging to the League 
because amateurs that cannot operate 
have no reason for belonging to an organi- 
zation that deals with the operation of 
amateur radio stations 



HYPOCRISY 



How far have we progressed in ham 
radio? Is it possible that our technology has 
passed our intelligence 7 Can It be that 
many of our population lean towards hy 
pocrtsy? 

One of the most common comments One 
hears on the air is, "Ham radio is so great, it 
has something for everyone. 1 ' I suppose 
I hey speak of lhe hobby where, if you have 
the money, you can own monobanders on 
each band, several transceivers, and ampli- 
fiers. Do we include the other guy? The one 
who lives by the dipole and no amplifier^ 
Which hoobylsl is more important? 

Looking back, more than halt of what I 
now have collected I owe lo a list or a net ol 
some kind. Myself, 1 have never taken a re- 
layed report, which some seem so con- 
cerned about The percentage of people 
who operate with the same sell -dignity set 
of rules I operate with is probably 96 percent 
I have sal tn awe at my station listening 
10 what some say is the only way to work a 
DX station (the pi leapt l have heard 
gentlemen such as FB6WG and A51PN 
{and lhe Use could go on) try to dig a call or 
just a letter Out Of the piloup: being un- 
able to do so because people kept call Inn 
so long, they just go GRT or QSY, 

Gentlemen, channel efforts towards 
making ham radio a better hobby. During 
contests, for example, stations alt over the 
ba nds ru n 20-30 kHz wide These guys don ' l 
care, because it keeps others from moving 
Close, Why not foe us support towards a Ho I 
ting overlapped segments of the General 
and Advanced band, i.e., 14250-14300 kHz 
This way. noncon testers are not forced out 
of their weekend of operating. How many 
lists or nets mess up the whole band for 
others throughout the entire weekend? I 
suppose thaf s OK, though ^ because some- 
where, someone up there likes contests. 

i firmly believe that the majority ot the 
old-timers that ere against lists or such 
have all or nearly all of their countries and 
have done so during times when the ham 
population was one-tenth what it is today I 
would ^ike to see them start over with a di- 
pole and bareioot 

I hope any kind of stand against lists 
andior nets is only a rumor. Lei us consider 
how much control any organization which 



is supposed to help hams should have over 
how we make a contact. 

I feel lhe desire lor the coveted accom- 
plishment in each of us will stop the lakmg 
of the invalid report. Those who are dishon- 
est will find a way to be dishonest in every 
facel ot ham radio, no matter what rules 
are set 

Gentlemen, ponder this and lei's all try 
to improve what we have and not lake 
away thai which each of us is entitled to. 

Philip Prrtchetl N6ATS 
Mounds OK 



VENDOR SERVICES 



You know the cliche: Each of us is eager 
and ready to take pen in hand and com- 
plain, grumble, bellyache, etc, against of 
about some vendor or products or services. 
But to say something nice about someone 
or something, that Is another scenario, and 
here comes one, 

I have been a ham tor about four years, 
starting at the tender age of 57. In this rela- 
tively brief period ? have sampled the wares 
and services of many vendors selling to 
amateur radio peopie Overall, it has been a 
pleasant experience, but tat me single {or is 
It double) oui two vendors from the many I 
have experienced 

First — Trio Kenwood, makers of fine rigs 
for two-meter and HF operation along with 
excellent. If somewhat expensive, audio 
S&61 l have been particularly impressed 
with service out of their Compton, Califor- 
nia, site They are professional and timely, 
either by mail or through the reception 
desk. One gets to speak to a technician 
right up front and if the one serving you is 
not familiar with your particular rig he goes 
for hel p I n t he back room . The rui e i s c ou rte- 
sy and the proper amount of sympathy. 
When appropriate, charges are less than 
the minimum " posted in the reception 
area. Service time is often less than posted 
minimum lime. All in all, mat service after 
the sale! 

I am eq u a I ly h ap py with the products and 
service from Communications Specialists, 
Orange, California, makers of tone genera- 
tors for PL applications. Customer service 
by telephone has always been polite and ef- 
ficient, You get the feeling that they care 
about their customers, On several occa- 
sions, Ihey have given no-charge service 
well after the end ot me warranty period, 
sevice required by my clumsiness rather 
than product failure. Again, a company that 
unslinilngly backs up its product. 

I would like to hear from other hams with 
similar experiences. 

I. Olitzky KA6CLE 
Venice CA 



[ 



BE AN ELMER 



] 



For the past several months I have been 
reading letters directed to you by pro- 
ponents and opponents of code-free licens- 
ing. I have yet to read one letter that ad- 
dresses lhe central issue, which I believe is 
how we as amateurs propose to make out 
hobby better, 

I struggled with the code and theory as, 
probably, most do. , . my call sign attests to 
thai. The pivotal feature is that persever- 
ance and desire can get most everyone 
past the hurdles. I do nol feel that 20-wpm 
code. , , 13-wpm code nay, even 5-wprn 
code, nor Mr Bash s crib text detract from 
amateur radio; neither do I feel that those 
things support ham radio. 1 feet amateur 
radios biggest asset lies in the individual 
hams who comprise our society and the 



fact ihai ham radio is a challenging and 
just plain fun hobby- 
Each and every one of us, the alreac 
licensed hams, should do our pan to fasci- 
nate, encourage, instruct, and support non- 
hams in the acquisition of an amateur li* 
cense. We should, on an individual basis, 
be Elmers to any who show an interest. We 
should, as groups or clubs, promote and 
participate in spreading the word that ham 
radio is tun by supporting and teaching 
classes. Learning aids are available. 73. 
Heathfcit*, the ARRL Ameco, and others 
publish many line learning aids The FCC. 
while not always as responsive as we 
would like, is the arbiter of our licensing ex- 
ams and makes Ihose exams available on 
schedule and without prejudice. 

What may be missing is the incentive for 
us as individual hams or groups of hams lo 
encourage others. I propose that 73 spear- 
head an el fori to encourage hams to teach 
others about ham radio How? 

1) Awards: I propose thai 73 offer awards 
to individuals and clubs, similar lo operat- 
ing awards, for getting amateurs licensed. 

2) Instructor training: Most of us can 
learn but many require help in the form ot 
syllabi, group instructional a*ds, and teach- 
ing techniques to enable us lo help others. 
Publish these aids- 

3) Public knowledge: Advertise to make 
the public aware ot amateur radio. The 
ARRL does this to some extent— more is 
needed. 

4) Hotline: Match Elmers (either Individ- 
uals or clubs) with prospective amateurs 
needing help Might work like an comput- 
er dating service. A national 600 number 
hotline is one possibility. 

5i Service awards: Encourage clubs to 
promote themselves by ottering club 
awards for participation in activities like 
SETs P RACES, MARS, etc. 

These are some of the possibilities 
There are probably many more ideas which 
would work better or attack a dilteront 
front. Not everyone wants to become a 
radio amateur For one thing it requires 
some discipline and effort and not every 
one is willing to devote the necessary 
energy, I feel that everyone who is willing to 
make the necessary commitments should 
be given alt the help possible by all of us 
amateur radio operators everywhere. 

Jeff Barstow WDfiDLK 
Rodney Ml 



BASH REFORM 



l am a 15-year old at Hereford High, and \ 
am writing about the public outcry (what I it 
tie there is ot it) towards Bash Educational 
Services In 73 for November, you reported 
the failure of 89 percent o< one of Bash's 
classes and restated your opposition to the 
books and classes. I must admit that I have 
great respeci for anyone who takes a firm 
stand for their own opinions. However! I do 
disagree with you on the "Bash Book" 
debacle. 

When you really think about it. Bash's 
system was a radical concept, but as with 
all once-new ideas, an tmfMovement ts 
needed (not a banK 

Now think about this: You nave to admii 
thai for anyone intent on passing "Big 
Brother's" exam for upgrade ii is a Her- 
culean effort to find all of the Informal I on 
(much less, carry Lhe ton of books needed) 
for passing the bewitching exam; even the 
ARRL Study Guftte is nowhere near enough. 
Anyone who has no prior knowledge of the 
theory will quickly find out that the Study 
Qukfe Is a good book tor introducing them 
to the theory but in no way prepares I hem 
for the double- and irlple-ialk used by the 
FCC to befuddle our minds, if you get all of 



116 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



the necessary books to study out of. you 
wind up study ir>g a lot of information, 70 
percent of which you will probably never 
use or went to know or is not even on the 
lest, Alt of this useless information mainly 
serves Its purpose by wandering around our 
minds and mingling with the facts needed, 
This usually causes a nasty surprise in the 
form of a failure. 

My Idea for improvement is a simple 
change Continue collecting Qs and As 
from tests but not fo* printing in etieat 
books I wou*d simply use these and take all 
of the ham-radio-related books I could get 
(if I had the sources) and find all I could in 
the way of theory and facts to back up a If of 
the answers. Take these arranged facts and 
write them into an eaay to- understand form 
of writing with flavor and a small vocabu- 
lary (you want more young hams; write it so 
we can understand you). Without using bor- 
ing, dragging wording, present the theory 
well, and towards the end of the book In- 
troduce readers to the language used by 
ihe FCC and get Them very familiar with It 
Also, a copy of the regs in FCC form with 
simple English definitions would be 
desired by many people. 

I think that anyone bringing out such a 
book would end the era of the Bash Books, I 
know that my idea is not new, but I have yet 
lo see it In the print of a large magazine. 

Thank you for your good magazine and 
for your time. 

Glen White NA52 
Hertford TX 



YOU'RE MY TYPE 

Your last two issues of 73, namely Oc- 
tober and Novemper. have been more my 
type ol magazine Since t keep my own 
notebook of the in teres ling articles I see in 
the mags, you have kept me busy lately, 
you see, I look for articles that took inter- 
esting to put on the breadboard and play 
with and when I've played with one long 
enough and il looks like a good project to 
finish, so much rhe belter. 

In regard to your continually pressing for 
more amateurs. I feel that I must put In my 
two bus worth Of all Ihe 50 or more Nov- 
ice b that have passed their exams around 
here t he past t wo years or so. t here are on ly 
about two or so on Ihe air. Everyone ts in- 
terested «n DX — how far can we get oui, eie. 
The biggest problem seems to be money 
Very lew seem to be interested rn building. 
Frankly, l think we need a good set of text- 
books that will lake the prospective ham 
Irom beginning to end. 

I'm all for your computer networks, but 
so far your computer articles are way over 
my head and I cannoi afford the price of 
a computer to figure them ouL The day you 
can show me 73 articles where l can borrow 
my wife's portable TV set and, with the min- 
imum of cost, put it on the air. that will be 
Ihe day, You'll have to hurry, though: 
I'm 74 years old. 

Laurence A. K nut son W9SFL 
La Crosse Wl 



SCHOLARSHIPS 






The officers and directors ot the ARRL 
foundation announce the recipients of two 
awards for the 1982-63 academic year The 
Long island School Scholarship, lor youths 
attending Long bland colleges or univer- 
sities has been granted to Paul Michael 
Silverman KA2DSP, Of Levi t town NY. He 
entered State University of New York at 
Farmmgdale In September to pursue 
courses in electronics technology. The 



$250 ARRL Foundation-administered 
award was given to this young man for 
demon st rated interest and excellence m 
promoting amateur radio and for aspiring 
to an electronics carreer 

The YL ISSB Memorial Scholarship has 
been awarded, for the second successive 
year, to Larry Edwin Smith, Jr WB9UKE. 
The awarding of $709 lo Larry concludes 
ihe ARRL Foundation's administration of 
this scholarship fund «Of YL ISSS Larry 
pursues associate and bachelor's degrees 
in electronics engineering aspires to a 
career with NASA communications, holds 
amateur Extra and 2nd class commercial 
licenses, has maintained an A academic 
average, and has been very active in ©^ 
tracurrtcuUr activities at Vincennes 
University. 

ARAL Foundation-administered scholar 
ships are open to ail applicants, qualifica- 
tions and specific criteria being reviewed 
by screening boards consisting of ARRL 
Foundation officers and directors and 
panels provided by sponsoring organiza- 
tions Application closing dale is May 1, 
198% far the next academic year. 

Andrea T. Parker K I WU 

Secretary, ARRL Foundation 

Newington CT 



FINDING BIRDS 

Finally, I have found why the RSn 
satellites aren i where they were supposed 
to be; The I racking program was wrong! I'm 
referring lo "Tracker— The Ultimate 
OSCAR Frnder,'" p. SB, 73 Magazine, 
January, 1981. The computation tor satel- 
lite longitude is correct only lor satellites 
with inclination greater than 90 degrees 
The sign of the variable SO needs lo be 
changed for satellites like the recenl Rus- 
sian ones with Inclination less than 90 de- 
grees I take care oi it in my revised Apple 
version this way: 

»1*CA = COS{INiSG= ^SO'CA/ 
(ABS {CAN * CO'RD + RD'Tltf 

There are many ways to accomplish this 
sign change; this is the mathematician's 
way, 

Actually, thus program is not the only 
place this error is made. The RSGS VHF 
Handbook puts that correction for mclma- 
tKin on the TIM lerm, The reference that I 
found to e* plain in is correction is by Bryan 
Lei peer, "Circulation Obits with Simple 
Compuling Systems." OSL February, 1979, 
pp. 38-42. 

Dr. Gerald N. Johnson K6CQ 

Ames IA 

Thanks for the tip, Gersid We though} the 
Russians were fust betng obstinate-,— Eds, 



NO FAULT, PCBs 



I just finished reading "Avoiding the 
Electrical Nightmare, on page 64 of the 
October issue regarding the unusual volt- 
ages encountered by M4UH of Cleveland. 
North Carolina, l was prompted ro write 
because, while his technical analysis is 
correct, his terminology is noi. There is a 
great difference between a "ground fault" 
and the condition he describes which is an 
"open neutral." 

A true ground-fault condition is just what 
the name implies— a fault to ground, or 
earih Visualize your electrical panel and 
the wires In it for a moment. The black wire 
from the breaker Is the neutral or reiurn part 
of the circuit. An electric light connected 
between the black and white conduclors 
completes the circuit The current flowing 



'out' the black wire is equal in magnitude 
to the current flowing m the white wire If 
we m I reduce a fault into the circuit (such as 
a broken insulation protecting the black 
wire from shorting to Ihe panelboard bo*), 
then current will flow through the light fix- 
ture and back out as before, bui also 
through the black wire lo the insulation 
fault to ground and back to the neutral ai 
the point where the neutral and ground are 
common This is a ground fault and the cur- 
rent flowing in the ground conductor <s not 
equal to me current flowing in the neutral 
reiurn. 

Ground- fault circuit rnterrupters <GFl or 
GFCn are devices thai sense Ihe current 
flowing ou I the black wire and the current 
flowing in < he white wire. If the difference Is 

greater than 5 mA (for the typical residen- 
tial uniis), then the device interrupts the 
curronl If the fault from the black wire lo 
ground was through your arm, you would be 
most appreciative 

The fault described in the article ts an en- 
tirety different problem. The problem expe- 
rienced by N4UH was an open neutral The 
return conductor (the white wire) was open, 
creating a voltage-divider effect between 
the tegs of the power system. 

The National Electrical Code (NFPA-70- 
1981) requires that all electrical systems be 
grounded The grounding should be ac- 
complished at a single location. This loca- 
tion, as required by the code, is at the sup- 
ply side of Ihe service at the main service 
disconnect This ts the only location where 
the neuiral and ground are brought 
together All of the uninsulated ground 
wires running around In your Rome* are for 
ihe purpose of extending this ground point 
to each and every receplable and light Ma- 
ture in your house. A ground fault a I any 
location in your home will cause the ground 
conductor to carry the return current back, 
to ihe common prnnl wifh the neutral ai the 
service disconnect 

It should be noted that the type of prob- 
lem encountered is rare and should not 
cause alarm on the pan of those with 
aluminum service-onlrance conductors. 
Utility practices vary bul always account 
for the problems of aluminum oxidation. 
Aluminum connections, it properly made, 
are very reliable and need not be of concern 
to the homeowner. {This applies to the 
larger sizes of aluminum and not necessan 
ty to aluminum branch-circuit wiring, but 
that would be the subject of an entire arti- 
cle in itselU 

As long as I am writing. I also would like 
to extend a word of caution regarding the 
article on page 29, "Dissertation Upon 
Roast Pig" by N6TO- The transformers ob- 
tained from the utility most (ifceiy were im- 
mersed *n mineral oil A few transformers 
are si ill in circulation,, however, which corv 
tarn poiychlor mated biphenyl fPCB) PCB is 
a major component in coolani known as 
Askaret." This is nasly stuff which is very 
toxic and must be disposed of In accor- 
dance with EPA regulations. Under no 
circumstances should you atlempt to use a 
transformer thai contained this coolant. 
The uillily should not even consider selling 
you a transformer which contains PCB. 
Because Ihe utility may not know which 
transformers contain PCB, you may dis- 
cover one by mistake In addition lo 
transformers, some high-voltage capac- 
itors used in commercial equipment a few 
years back also contained PCB insulating 
material. Be cautious with all surplus and 
uaed electrical components containing oil 
for cooling or insulation. 

Dave Olsen KL7K 
Anchorage AK 



AMERICAN & METRIC 

62-PiECE 

HEAVY DUTY 

INDUSTRIAL TOOL CHEST 



$28 



Before Midnight Jan. 23 

We will send to each reader of 
this publication who reads and 
responds to this test before 
midnight Jan. 23 , a 62- piece 
American and Metric Heavy Du- 
ty Industrial tool set and metal 
storage chest containing all the 
basic and special tools nec- 
essary to service and repair do- 
mestic and foreign trucks, trac- 
tors, autos, and all heavy indus- 
trial machinery. Consists of 7 
American 3/8 Inch drive sockets 
{3/cV). (7/16"}, (t&% (9/16"), 
{5/8"), (11/16"). (3/4"), 9 
American 1/4 inch drive sockets 
{3/16"). (7/32"), (1/4"), (9/32"), 

(5/i6"% (11/32"), {M"j, (mea 

(1/2"), 9 Metric 3/8 Inch drive 
sockets, (9MM) t (10MM), 
(11MM), (12MM), (13MM), 
(14MM), (16MM), 07MM), 
{19MM)» 9 Metric 1/4 inch drive 
SOCketS, (4.5Mlvty (5MM},(6MM), 
(7MM), {BMM}, <9MM) f (10MM), 
(11MM). (T2MM). A 3/8 inch fine 
tooth ratchet with Quick release 
drive combination-forward and 
reversible, a 1/4 inch x 3/8 inch 
adapter, a 3/9 inch drive exten- 
sion bar 3 inch, A 3/8 Inch spark 
pl ug socket with oil resistant in- 
sert and speed installation and 
removal. An IB-piece industrial 
steel ignition wrench set, com- 
plete set of spark plug gap set- 
ting gauges for any type of 
spark plug. One *'1M-drive 
heavy screwdriver. (One) large 
set of feeler gauges, industrial 
"Phillips" heavy duty and "reg- 
ular" screwdriver, All tools are 
drop forged alloy steel for 
durable heavy duty repair work, 
and will be accompanied with a 
LIFETIME guarantee that It 
must perform 100% or It will be 
replaced free. Add $7 handling 
and crating tor each Tool Chest 
requested, we pay all shipping. 
Should you wish to return your 
tools, you may do so for a full 
refund. Any letter postmarked 
later than Jan. 23 will be re- 
turned, UMIT: Six (6) sets per 
address, no exceptions. Send 
appropriate sum together with 
your name and address to: Too! 
Test Dept. #120DW. Viking tnd. t 
6314 Santa Monica B!vd, Los 
Angeles, CA 90038, or for fast- 
est service from any part of the 
country, call collect before mid- 
night 7 days a week (213) 
462-1914 (Ask for) TOOL TEST, 
#120DW\ have credit card 
ready. 






73 Magazine • January, 1983 117 



W2NSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

editori slI t>y Wayne Green 



from page 8 

bringing world reports to 73 
could do the job. 

We do have a world hobby, so 
lets see if we can get it to- 
gether more. 

HAMMING FOR CREDIT? 

Down In Georgia there is a 
proposal to have ham classes 
count for educational credits. 
That's a good move- 
There is a desperate need to 
gel amateur radio going again in 
our schools and this approach 
could generate some interest 
for the students. It would be a 
way of T so to say. paying the stu- 
dents back with credits as well 
as in fun. 

Though it is old hat to 73 read- 
ers to read about the needs 
America has for technical peo- 
ple*. Tve been writing about 
that for several years now. . .I 
see that the general media are 
getting more concerned over the 
problem. Even the normally lib- 
eral writers are getting to worry 
about the overwhelming loss oi 
technical consumer products to 
Japan. 

With the increasingly rapid 
development of video technolo- 
gy, microcomputers, data ac- 
cess over the phone or via televi- 
sion stations, video teleconfer- 
encing, satellite services, 100- 
channel TV cables, and so on, it 
is getting ever more difficult for 
the general public to ignore the 
coming developments. They've 
even been noticing that almost 
all of the recent developments 
have been coming from Japan 
and figured out that this just 
might make it difficult for Amer- 
ica to catch up once we fall seri- 
ously behind. 

Articles about this have been 
appearing with increasing regu- 
larity in Newsweek, Time* Busi- 
ness Week, Fortune, and so on. 
The situation is getting so sen* 
ous that a small handful of our 
educators is beginning to get 
uneasy. When a problem reach- 
es that level, you know it has to 
be serious. 

Naturally, there are pressures 
for our government to force 

118 73 Magazine • January, 1 



Americans to buy more expen- 
sive and technically-inferior 
products just because they are 
made here instead of in Asia . ■ , 
just as there are heavy pres- 
sures to force Americans to buy 
crummier cars because they are 
made here. I'd like to see more 
interest in American productiv- 
ity. American pride In perfec- 
tion, and American unions pro- 
moting something besides the 
highest pay possible . . . with the 
result that the products are 
priced out of the market. 

But that's another problem . * . 
to some degree. The key to any 
American success in communi 
cations and computers in the 
next twenty years ties in our hav* 
ing the technically-qualified 
people to invent the products, 
manufacture them, sell them, 
operate them, and service them. 
This is going to take an enor- 
mous number of engineers, 
technicians, and scientists, 
vastly beyond anything which 
we even have in prospect to 
develop in this country. 

Only Japan has laid the 
groundwork to develop the high- 
technology people who are go- 
ing to be needed to provide the 
whole world with video, comput- 
ers, information, and other tech- 
nical services which are going to 
be the key to personal happi- 
ness, business success, ^nd ed- 
ucational achievement in, say. 
twenty years- 
While we're busy lowering our 
academic standards and seeing 
our proponents of liberal-arts 
education winning most of the 
battles in academia, we see Ja- 
pan loading their schools with 
enthusiastic technically- in- 
clined students. Do you realize 
that there are over 900,000 ama- 
teur radio operators in Japan to- 
day? They have us outnumbered 
in active hams by a margin of at 
least three to one., .possibly 
four to one. -.and Japan has 
only half of ourpopulation! They 
are running rings around us. 

Amateur radio has never been 
a very popular hobby in Amer- 
ica. Even when we were growing 
at our greatest rale, back in the 
1950s, we were growing at only 

983 



about 11% per year, which was 
about 22,000 newcomers. Then, 
with the "incentive Hcensing" di- 
saster of the 1960s, we feil to ze- 
ro growth (and worse)- Now 
we're back into a growth mode, 
but not an impressive one. 

Unless the Japanese technol- 
ogy program runs out of steam, 
their teenagers will be doubting 
the number of hams in Japan in 
the next three years, while at our 
rate of growth we are looking at 
about eight years for a doubling 
of our hams. 

There has been some criti- 
cism of calls for more engineers 
with a reminder that only a few 
years ago massive numbers of 
engineers were dumped and 
were unable to find work. To a 
degree, that is right. But what is 
glossed over In that response is 
that the engineers and techni- 
cians who joined the unem- 
ployed were those who had not 
kept up with the changes in 
technology. There has never 
been any surplus of technically- 
trained people. 

Remember I hat by 1970 it had 
dawned on even the mosi back- 
ward of firms that solid state 
was here and unavoidable. This 
was when the axe felL Those en- 
gineers who were living in the 
good old tube days were sud* 
deniy not needed. This axe was 
wielded again when the industry 
discovered ICs and had no fur- 
ther use for engineers who 
could not cope with them. Each 
new generation of electronics is 
going to be ruthless in weeding 
out the people who do not adapt 

Today, the need is for young 
engineers and technicians. Our 
schools have been almost total- 
ly emptied of these talented 
people, leaving the over-40 rem- 
nants of previous technologies 
to try to teach things they 
haven't bothered to fully under- 
stand. This does not bode well 
for our schools or the next 
generation of kids. . the ones 
we're depending on to cope with 
the Japanese incursions, 

Amateur radio can help, at 
least to a degree. By interesting 
teenagers in a high-tech hobby, 
we may be able to develop the 
engineers and technicians we 
need, both for industry and for 
our schools as teachers. Of 
course, the exceedingly slow 
growth of amateur radio over 
the last twenty years has meant 
that the average age of ama- 
teurs has been rising steadily, 
with the result that within our 
ranks we have few qualified 



teachers to get new hams start- 
ed. The technical competence 
of hams as compared with in- 
dustry has been dropping for 
twenty years, where at one time 
hams were a cut above the aver 
age engineer or technician. 

I can remember the time when 
hams were responsible for vir- 
tually every major breakthrough 
in radio communications. Now 
we can merely point out that 
long ago hams pioneered FlVt 
NBFM. SSB, SSTV- RTTY, and 
so on. We old, doddering relics 
of the past can remember the 
pride of those olden days. But 
the world is ruthless; it wants to 
know what you've done for it 
lately. Not much. 

The plan for giving scholastic 
credits for ham classes is a fine 
move; let's see if we can get that 
idea spread around. Til be inter- 
ested in getting articles for 73 
on proven ways of getting teen- 
agers interested In amateur 
radio and on successful pro- 
grams to get amateur radio 
growing. 

In the meanwhile. I'd like to 
see a lot more articles in 73 on 
current technologies. Perhaps 
we can get amateur radio back 
into developing some inventors 
and pioneers of new techniques. 
Running articles on designing 
and building kilowatt tube- 
powered linear amplifiers is not 
it. . . unless someone designs a 
digital automatic-tuning device. 

There is no shortage of things 
to invent which are well within 
our technical capability. . . if we 
let ourselves go and get crack- 
ing on it. For instance, we could 
use a system for automatic 
identification of transmitters so 
that our receivers would Indi- 
cate the call of the station being 
tuned in as we tune. This could 
be done via an ASCII signal sent 
on a subcarrier, thus furnishing 
the receiver a reference signal to 
use for automatic tuning. Once 
we have that development, we 
will be ready for receiver-tuning 
systems which will be automat- 
ic, alerting you when chosen 
prefixes or calls are tuned in. 

This could be a great stride 
ahead for amateur radio, pio- 
neering a new digital communi- 
cations technology which could 
be quickfy applied to CB, two- 
way, and most other communi- 
cations services. It could help to 
bring about some extensive 
changes in amateur radio opera- 
tion, too., .perhaps the first 
real changes in over 50 years 
Except for the development ot 






RTTY/CW 

For theTRS-BD 



' A Trademark of trie Tandy Cui p 




ROM-116 

Now includes: 

• TEXT EDITING 

• RTTY PICTURES 

• S A V E TEXT TODISK Detailed brochure available on request. 



Featuring: 



1200 BAUD OPERATION. Not limited to 110 baud 
because of timing loops. 60, 66, 75 & 100 
W.P.M, Plus 110, 150, 300, 600 & 1200 baud 
operations possible, 

FLEXIBILITY OF OPERATION. Instantly change: 
Baud Rates: Program Mode (ASCII/Baudot); 
Program Status. 

SPLIT SCREEN VIDEO. Transmit & receive data 
displayed separately. 

REAL TIME. Automatic CW/ID without user in- 
tervention. Automatically 

updates at end of month 

or year. ^S CROW ft 

fOicroProducts 



Other features 
include- 

Two Serial Ports 
Fourteen Buffers 
Automatic CW/ID 
Transmit Control 
Selective Call Feature 
Error Correction & Editing 
Word Wrapmg 
Easy to Interface 
30 Day Unconditional 
Guarantee 

Hardware Requirements: 
TRS-eOMocteHoflll 16K 
EXTERNAL TERMINAL UNIT 
REQUIRED 



606 State Street P.O. Box 892-R • Marysville, WA 98270 • (206) 659-4279 



CW MORSE 

for the 

TRS-80* COLOR 

COMPUTER 

Our Plug- in Morse-Pa^ 
interfaces the Color 
Computer to your 

transceiver and allows 
you to communicate in 

CW Morse Code 
through the computer, 

if In stalls in minutes* 

* Simple to operate* 

^Handles code speeds 

up to 60 wpm* 
many more features 



L 



We stock a complete tint- of color campul* 
*K£cJ50i-'E's . mcfudu 

•Floppy ask const-alters 'Serial I/O 
Port* * Addon FPROM kftS ■ Plug 
Breadboards - RAM I n. pans ton kits. 

16K 6*A - ofJdntor* 

Write for brochure to: 

ATOMTRONICS " m 
3195 ARIZONA AVE. 
LOS ALAMOS, NM 87544 

" " F unciy Corporal ton 




Organise yaur shack with a 

CLUTTERFREE MODULAR 
CONSOLE $203.35 

• Large, 42" H x 57" W x 29 D 

• Strong groove-construction 

■ Mar-resistant wood grain finish 

• Options, drawers & face plate 

• For ham or home computer 

• Visa and Master Charge 

CLUTTERFREE 

MODULAR 
CONSOLES 

P.O. Box 5103 Tacoma, WA 98405 
(206)272*0713 **&* 




Mudd HF6V Completely autcmnlu, bundswiTf hmg 
SO through 10 pluft 3.0 merteWfc Outperforms all 4- art I 
& bund trap" verticals ot rorupareble swe Thousand* 
Id usg woMcivvn1i- Ninon December '011 16D mi.<ii>i 
option available now retrofit teas lew tomsiningWAflC 
bunds, corning soon Heighi 26 Hr ~f a meters; guv«"fl 
nof required m mosr rrtsiJaltanons 



Mode»2MCV Trernhc*^ '-* 
gem vertical far 2 meters having ihe Same gam a* 
cJchjWk-H* tvpn* tvt the patented t ror ntaona" 
pheamg section asows the ratftator (o r enwin urnxc*«r> 
tiv ingulaKXS tor mflxmnLiiTi strength m high wrtids No 
COtil plumber-, iiMtiohr construction and adjustable 
g^mma match fpr complfiLa D C. grounding and 
loWeil possible SWR HHighl 9 S ft/2 96 meiera 



, * Mrxle4 2MCV 5 Supe* Trombone " -Same 

vyi/L^ a^^^nced features as ibp basjc 2MCV but 

£:^1 ■ *uv waveiength tailor with addrtmnel 

, T* ,Jc "fw*r*Jcne * phasing *♦- *or addtionaJ 

*Y^V' pan^ Height 1 6 75 f 1/4 J& meters 



AJi BUTTERNUT ANTENNAS um ctawite&s Steel 
hardware anaa*e guaranteed for a *uU year Forfurther 
rm^tior on These and other BUTTERNUT product* 
write for our FREE CATALOG' 

BUTTERNUT 
ELECTRONICS 

GAflV AlRPOftT BOX 3&© E ATI . 
SAN iSflAHCOS TEXAS ?a©6« 



See Usi of Advertisers on page J M 



73 Magazine • January. 1983 119 



the vfo f our Morse-code commu- 
nications has changed hardly at 
all in 50 years. And other than 
the shift to SSB t phone commu- 
nications is almost identical to 
hamming of 50 years ago, com- 
plete with pileups on DX, jam- 
ming, endless nets, and so on. 

We've had practical RTTY on 
the ham bands (or over thirty 
years and there still is no notice- 
able dent in traffic handling as a 
result, Amateur radio, which at 
one time was the spawning 
ground for new technologies, 
has turned into the most rigid 
and unchangeable remnant of 
the past. 

You invent it and well publish 
It. . . okay? Let's get amateur ra- 
dio into gear for the First time in 
years. The last change of any 
sort was over ten years ago 
when we went to FM and repeat- 
ers on two meters. Unfortunate- 
ly we contributed little techni- 
cally in this move, merely taking 
advantage of the already-exist- 
ing technology developed for 
two-way commercial operating. 
Now let's do some pioneering 
for a change. 

DIGITAL MANIA 

With the new freedoms being 
granted by the FCC, Td like to 
see some serious experiment- 
ing on our bands with digital 
techniques. Ham radio is never 
going to go anywhere unless we 
get busy and take advantage of 
the recent technological advan- 
tages in ICs. 

For one thing, isn't it about 
time that the RTTY crowd stopped 
puttering around, dodging QRM. 
and came up with some circuits 
which will dig out those weak 
signals and copy them? I tried a 
recently-advertised computer- 
ized-RTTY setup and was as- 
tounded to find out how crummy 
it was . . , even as compared with 
the circuits we were building 
back in 1948. Almost any kind of 
interference sent it into spasms 
of incomprehension. 

Fellows, I have some news for 
you. You should be designing 
RTTY gear which uses the el 
cheapo computers such as the 
Timex 1000 (Sinclair 2X81), the 
Atari 400 f the VIC-20 and so on. 
Your circuit should make it duck 
soup to tune in a signal. , .and 
copy should be 100%, despite 
GW or other neighboring RTTY 
signals. You should copy 
through GRM, ORN, jamming, 
fading, with any shift, and so on. 
Lets get cracking at this and 
stop horsing around with junk 



which falls apart as soon as a 
vindictive GW-monger gets on 
channel. There is, as you may 
not know, apparently an unlim- 
ited supply of CW jammers, ati 
with unlimited time to sit and 
trash RTTYers. Perhaps we 
should devise a certificate, with 
yearly awards. 

And while one contingent is 
doing the inventing which 
should have been done several 
years ago but which was pre- 
vented by the FCC, bless "em. 
others of you should grab your 
chips and start working serious- 
ly on automatic identification 
for transmitters. Some early ex- 
periments indicated that a sys* 
tern would work using a frequen- 
cy*shifted subaudible tone, but 
we need to do a lot more work on 
this. If someone can come up 
with a relatively simple system 
which can be built into every 
transmitter, we can save the 
several eons of time every year 
which are presently wasted with 
redundant identification. Just 
think of the saving on pileups 
alone, where perhaps around 
five thousand stations are giv 
ing their calls from fifty to one 
hundred times per minute, hour 
after hour. There is a zero In Min 
nesota with the unofficial record 
of 117 complete identifications 
in one minute! A record to be en- 
vied. I understand there is a 
move to get this amazing chap 
on "People Are Weird." 

Once we have a fairly fast au- 
tomatic-Identification system, 
we'll be able to instantly read 
out the call of any station tuned 
in on our receiver. We'll also be 
able to build in a microproces- 
sor to check the call for wanted 
calls or prefixes. Those rare 
ones can come and go pretty 
fast sometimes, so why miss 
one just because he is 50 kHz 
down the band from where you 
are working? With an automatic 
tuning system (dual tuning, of 
course), one receiver tuner will 
be on your channel for you while 
the other is scanning the band, 
checking out the prefixes. 

And a couple of years later. 
the whole thing will be in an HT 
for us. Just ask any of the early 
two-meter folk about the first 
FM rigs and compare them with 
the programmable, scanning- 
all-channel HTs of today. You 
know what we haven't seen yet? 
Anything! 

So, while all you old-timers sit 
around and fondle your 807s. 
we're looking to the youngsters 
to stop fooling around with girfs, 



get going with with their pile of 
ICs T and invent us out of the 
1930s morass that amateur ra- 
dio is in today. The technology 
is here. The parts are here. The 
need is here.,. and riches are 
awaiting the entrepreneurs who 
make it happen. 

One thing is for sure, ....If you 
invent it, Vm anxious to publish 
your articles in 73 and get the 
ball rolling, 

HELP! 

Every now and then I see a no- 
tice that the League is looking 
for some hams to add to therr 
staff. Fine, I suppose, though 
my understanding is that the 
place is very T very structured. It 
also isn't growing much, in case 
you haven't read their yearly 
report, When I say it isn't grow- 
ing much, I mean thai the 
League has been losing mem- 
bers at an increasing rale for the 
last few years. That would make 
me nervous. 

Now. while they've been 
shrinking away, my little empire 
has been growing steadily. They 
need people to replace those 
who have bailed out. I need peo- 
ple to help us grow even more . , , 
and I don't think anyone would 
really characterize this place as 
rigidly structured. 

In addition to needing a good 
all-around ham or two to test 
ham gear and write reviews, to 
keep the W.2NSDM hamshack 
state-of-the-art fn RTTY f slow 
scan, repeaters, antennas, and 
so on, we also need someone to 
keep our microcomputers run- 
ning. We have a hundred or more 
around here and the darned 
things keep breaking. I think we 
could keep a compulsive techni- 
cian exceedingly happy. 

Our audio department has a 
serious need for a technician to 
be on top of all the digital re- 
cording techniques and assure 
us thai our digital and audio 
cassettes are first-rate. 

For people who for twisted 
psychological reasons are not 
particularly interested in living 
in the finest area of the whole 
country (the world?), we do have 
some part-time jobs available 
which can be done from any- 
where. These call tor a good 
deal of responsibility, of course. 
We're building our national net- 
work of sales people and have 
several nice areas still open. 
This would entail getting out to 
visit computer and electronics 
stores about three days a week 
to make sure that they are well 



stocked with our magazines, 
books, and computer programs. 

In Peterborough, we have 
open positions for people with 
PR and advertising experience, 
sales, editing, writing, graphic 
arts, photography, and so on. In 
the next year, we expect to add 
at least 100 people to the 
staff. . .possibly 200, if we can 
find them. 

We're looking for non-smok- 
ers who are more interested in 
developing careers than in just 
landing a job. Well be able to 
keep up our growth only if we 
keep up our enthusiasm and In- 
novation. Indeed, we've been 
growing briskiy for seven years 
now, and by the end of this 
month, we expect to be about 
five times the size of the ARRL 

So, if you are nol a smoker 
and you're looking for a place to 
put your outstanding talents to 
work where they can do the 
most good... and where you 
will be able to learn more and 
grow, think in terms of Peterbor- 
ough. Send along a letter detail- 
ing why we can't go a step tur- 
ther without you... and a 
resume. 

COMPUTERIZING 

With over 40% of the 73 read- 
ers computerized. ..and with 
thousands more eyeing the Timex 
computer. . .Td like to make 
sure there is no misunderstand- 
ing. I want to see you expert 
menting with amateur radio ap- 
plications of these contraptions 
and writing up your results for 
73. The readers are interested in 
articles on getting rid of com- 
puter noise. . .in protecting the 
computers from interference 
from the rig. . . in RTTY applica- 
tions. . .high-speed code. . . 
beam aiming ... log keeping . , . 
automatic QSLmg. ..packet 
communications. . .and so on. 

Unless you write up the re- 
sults of your work, it will be 
wasted. . .giving only you the 
benefit. The more you write 
about what you are doing, the 
more hams will join you in exper- 
imenting and developing new 
ideas— and well all benefit. 

Remember, too, that the 
market is just starting to open 
up for add-ons for the low-end 
computer systems, There are 
millions to be made by those 
who come up with practical new 
ideas. Weve already seen doz- 
ens of new millionaires as a re- 
sult of the recent microcom- 
puter developments. . .and we 
haven't seen anything yet. With 









120 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



M 2 ENGINEERING'S 

VHF H.T. CONVERTERS 



DOUBLE BAND HC-V, HCU2 



• SINGLE BAND HCV220 



• Bl- LATERAL PROTECTION AGAINST 
ACCIDENTAL TRANSMISSON 
FOR UP TO 5 WATTS 

STANDARD BNC • USES SINGLE 

CONNECTORS ^■■■^^^^^^^^^^^"■^^^^ AAA CELL 



HC-V 

154-158 
159-163 



HC-U2 

460-464 
480 "484 

HC-V220 

221-225 




LOW LOSS 
COUPLING TO 
ANTENNA 



OFF RETURNS 
TO NORMAL 
TRANSCEIVER 
OPERATION 

SIZE: approx. 
2x1.5 x1.5 

weight: 

3.9 ozs. 



HC-U2 

$59,95 



M SQUARED 
ENGINEERING, INC. 

1446 LANSING AVE. 
SAN JOSE,CA. 95118 

CALL SANDY 408*266-9214 



HC-V 

$39.95 



HC-V220 

$54.95 



DEALERS 
WELCOME 



Shipping included 

Calif, residents add 
6.5% sales tax 



Your Ham Tube 
Headquarters! 



TOLL 800-221-0860 FREE 
TUBES 



3J0QZ 
MOK 

4400* 
4C*159B 

SUA 

113 

61468 
63M 



sesw 

S65GC- 

MCOO 
$50 00 
139 50 

It200 

$35.00 

.J6.5G 

S4?5 



■us 

7560 

• ■-:- 
fliSfi 



W.75 

£10 95 

51*0 DO 

wsom 

$10 50 



t f JOHNSON Sochatt f« *CX2S09 4 « 400* . ft »5 



SEMfCONDUCTQRS 

MftF 24^SOi*i6 MO 00 

MflF 454 HG-*5 

MRF455 »IZ SO 

MHF 64450*068 11995 

■JN30M * .frS 

2N6W4 H250 



HF CONNECTORS 



PL 2» 

PL ZSfl 

UG 175/178 

ua 25SU 

UG 2T3W 

M 354 

M 3S9 

Typ« "W twin 



1WK 

tarti.fio 

12 50 ma. 
f 2.2S •■ 
$250 *■ 
ti 75** 



TOP BRAF^D Popular Recervmg Tube Types 

FACTORY BOXED 75*80% OFF UST 

FREE LIST Available 

Includes lull lineot RF Power Transistors. 

Minimum Order $25 

Allow $300 Minimum for UPS Charges 

Wrrte or phone lor free catalog. 
TUBES— BOUGHT, SOLD AND TRADED 



Pr9mium Prices 




Paid 
For El MAC Tubes 



COMMUNICATIONS, inc. 
2115 Avenue X 
Brooklyn, NY 11235 
Phone (212) 646-6300 '** 



FOURTH 
GENERATION 



SATELLITE 
RECEPTION 



NOW! 

With D.C.E.'S 70 MHZ 
VIDEO PROCESSOR BOARD 

FEATURES: 

IF. Strip Includes S.A. W. BP Filter 
Discrete 70 MHZ PLL Demodulator 
Full AGC & AFC 

Normal/ Reverse Video 

On Board Power Supply Regulation 



The most advanced 
Satellite Video 
Processor Available 



KIT MZ4.M 

ASSEMBLED. #44*00 



Digicom Engineering, Inc. 

P.O. 80X Ittf 
KODIAK. ALASKA M615 

CStTJ4ftfr-5LIK 

ORDERING INFORMATION Chech. MO. or CyDs tC 
cefrted. AintmU shipping ca*u wuhtn US included in price 

i Allow | wee* fgr delivery). Foreign orderm incJutta 15 .qo for 
shipment by mr 



Don't Be Left Out in the Cold 
with the Russian Woodpecker 

GET A 

MOSCOW 

M U FFLER" 

Another first from AEA. The 
Woodpecker Blanker, WB 1 really 
works. This unit effectively blanks the 
pulsing interference of the Russian 
Woodpecker. Two versions are 
available, the WB-1 for use with com- 
munication receivers and WB-1C for 
use with alt popular transceivers, 




This extremely useful accessory is 
designed for direct insertion between 
your receiver (or transceiver) and the 
antenna. It is both MORE EFFECTIVE 
than l,F. type blankers and requires 
NO MODIFICATIONS to your receiver! 
The unit operates from a 1 3 VDC ± 2 
VOC power source at less than 575 
mA (AEA AC wall unit AC 1 will 
operate the blanker) 

The blanker works well on both CW 
and SSB modes that are being in* 
terfered with by a woodpecker, Con- 
trots on the front panel include; four 
push button switches, a synchronize 
control and a width control The WB-1 
also features a low-noise untuned 
broadbanded 6 db gain pre-amp which 
can be selected with or without the 
blanker enabled. The WB-1C uses the 
same circuitry but includes a carrier 
operated relay (COR). This provides 
protection to the receiver section dur- 
ing transmissions from the attached 
transceiver. 

For more details, write for our latest catalog or 
visit your favorite dealer. 

Prices and Specifications subject to change 
without notice or obligation. 

ADVANCED ELECTRONIC 
APPLICATIONS, INC. ** 
P.O. Box C-2160, 
Lynnwood, WA 98036 
(206) 775-7373 
Telex: 152571 AEA INTL 

m E7 ^L Brings you the 
JP^JwF^I Breakthrough! 






See List of Advertisers on page i u 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 121 



hundreds of thousands of Time* 
computers being sold, just 
about any useful accessory for 
it wilt be able to generate 
millions in sales. 

In order to encourage this de- 
velopment. Microcomputing will 
be devoting a special section to 
the low-end computers. We 
need not only interfaces, pro* 
grams on cassettes, and so 
forth, but we may also have a 
need for better ROM character 
generators and operating sys- 
tems, plug-in BOM programs, 
and so on, 

I've helped a lot of people get 
very wealthy in the microcom- 
puter business. . .and lean help 
you t if you are seriously interest- 
ed, 1 write about this in my edi- 
torials in Microcomputing, 80 
Micro, and Setting Micros, and 
II I be covering this aspect in in- 
Cider, too, It's fun to be rich* and 
the opportunities are almost un- 
ending. As a ham, you have an 
inside track, if you have the wilt. 

HOWS THE ARRL DOING? 

Too bad you didn't get the 
QST annual report. . .and read 
it. In amongst the lavish self- 
praise , . . an orgy of it . . . are the 
stark financial figures, and they 
are so dark-cloud that they tend 
to cul through the baloney 
Membership is down. And de- 
spite the massive increase in 
the subscription price for QST, 
the income for the League has 
not even kept up with inflation. 
Nowhere near it! 

The financial management in 
any normal business would call 
for the immediate replacement 
of the people responsible. Of the 
74 stocks and bonds in which 
the League has put the money 
they've made in profits in past 
years. . .being a nonprofit cor- 
poration they have to salt away 
all that money rather than dis- 
tribute it to the stockholders. , . 
only eight are worth more now 
than they paid for them. Maybe 
you were wondering who was in- 
vesting in oil companies, rail 
roads, and so on. Hen. heh. 
you are. 

They seem to have concen- 
trated on economizing on mem- 
bership benefits such as 
awards, cutting that by 76% in 
1981. This ts balanced by an in 
crease in unemployment com* 
pensation which went up by 
973%, . .yep, almost ten times, 
as staffers went through the otd 
revolving door That's quite a 
one-year record. 

Automobile expenses only 



went up 370% in the year. Are 
they providing limousines for the 
top echelon these days? We did 
see healthy cuts in such pork* 
barrel items as ARRL headquar- 
ters expenses, which were 70% 
higher in 1978, And the W1 AW ex- 
penses came down, too. They 
were 51 % higher in 1980, It looks 
as if someone made a trip some- 
where, because while there were 
no overseas expenses chalked up 
in 1980 T they managed to spend 
$17,762 in 1981. That's a very 
nice trip! 

Unless you take a serious in* 
terest In League financial mat- 
ters, you have no beef about 
what they are doing. You are a 
stockholder of the corporation 
and should look into how your 
money is invested. You might 
even question why the HQ peo- 
ple are salting away millions in 
stocks and bonds, losing your 
shirt for you with poor invest- 
ments, when perhaps they 
should be spending your money 
on more services, - .or, even 
better, in encouraging some 
growth in amateur radio. 

A million-dollar budget to pro* 
duce some first-rate films about 
the excitement of amateur ra- 
dio. ..about the benefits of 
amateur radio to our coun- 
try . . .about how to start a high- 
school ham club... could get 
amateur radio growing again. 
We have plenty of friends in tele- 
vision broadcasting to see that 
the films would get on the air 
And a million dollars wouldn't 
even put a big dent in the 
bankroll they've built up. It 
might keep them from blowing 
so much on lousy investments 
, . .and. after all isn't that what 
the money should be used for? 

Look, I know you hate to have 
me carping about the League. . . 
but I'm not giving the League 
hell right now, I'm giving you, 
the League member, hell. The 
chaps al HQ will do whatever 
they want with your money if 
you don't say anything, H's only 
by your being a silent partner to 
the crime that atl this money has 
just plain been thrown away. 
You haven't been paying atten- 
tion. You haven't been insisting 
on meeting with your directors 
and finding out from them what 
the situation at HO is... and 
they are not going to level with 
you unless you push them. 
They'll put the pressure on for 
membership benefits. . .and for 
promotion of the hobby. . .but 
only if you lean on them. 

The League, under the direc- 



tion of the directors you have 
elected- has been spending a 
pittance on membership bene- 
fits and promotion of the growth 
of the hobby. Get after 'em. . . 
let's see some growth, 

MAJOR LEAGUE CHANGES 

AFOOT? 

Knowing how undependable 
the rumor mills are, I don't put a 
lot of stock in repealed reports 
that Skip Tenney will soon be 
promoted as a replacemenl for 
Vic Clark as president, Tenney, 
well known as the publisher of 
Ham Radio magazine, either has 
sold or seems about to sell what 
is left of his magazine, so that 
would make him both available 
and eligible for the spot, 

The move makes sense, too, 
when you consider how close 
Tenney has worked with the 
League all these years. At times, 
it has seemed as If he were al- 
most an untitled League of fictai 
Being independently wealthy, 
Tenney wouldn't be restricted 
by the lack of remuneration 
which goes with the position, 

A lack of expected aggres- 
siveness on the part of the re- 
cently-appointed president 
seems to have sparked the 
search for someone to help take 
hold of the organization and get 
it into shape. Many of the direc- 
tors feel that it is important to 
have a businessman with expe- 
rience helping to guide the 
League into safer financial wa- 
ters,. -and perhaps stem the 
growing loss of GST sub* 
scribers. 

Others of the directors Nke 
Vic and feel that he should have 
more of a chance to get things 
turned around >,. to, so to 
speak, haul the old boat out of 
the water and scrape off the bar- 
nacles. I've personally always 
held Vic in the highest regard as 
a ham and a DXer. The directors 
should realize that even with a 
relatively small organization 
such as they have at HO, people 
get set in their ways and it is dif- 
ficult, „ .often very difficult.,, 
to bring about changes, no mat- 
ter how badly they are needed. 
My unasked-for council would 
be to give Vic more time and not 
rush with Tenney. 

BUILDERS VS. BUYERS? 

Sometimes I get the impres- 
sion that people will believe just 
about anything] First, we had a 
bunch of old hams, probably irri- 
tated because they had to 
change from AM to SSB, grous- 



ing that hams weren't building 
any more. I still hear that chorus 
when I visit some ham clubs, 
many of which seem to have 
been taken over by old old- 
timers. 

When I point out that there 
are more ads for parts in 73 
these days percentage-wise 
than there were in QST forty 
years ago, they look shifty-eyed 
and shut up. . .at least until I'm 
safely out of earshot. The fact is 
clear that hams are building as 
much or more than they ever did. 
It just isn't the old ones who are 
doing it. Possibly they're too 
busy watching television. 

The increased coverage of rel- 
atively simple building projects 
In 73 has sparked a lot more in- 
terest in building and experi- 
menting. Fine., .for that's one 
of the great pleasures of elec- 
tronics and hamming. I put quite 
a few years in at the workbench 
myself, with a barn lull of old 
gear I built to show for it . . , and 
a twisted pelvis from standing 
on one foot for about twenty 
years. The local chiropractor 
has given up trying to straighten 
it. . .and I've stopped seriously 
trying to lift anything heavy, I've 
paid my dues in building. 

There is a gross misunder- 
standing on the part of some of 
the manufacturers In the in- 
dustry. This is odd, because it 
really means that they have 
been reacting emotionally and 
not giving any serious thought 
with some research. 

This has to do with the inter- 
esting concept that hams who 
build are not very good custom- 
ers for commercial equipment, 
The facts are the opposite, as 
even a few moments of contem- 
plation will make clear. The ma- 
jor buyers of new equipment are 
the exact same people who are 
also building gadgets. Mow 
come? Let's look at it. 

First, a little lesson in eco- 
nomics. Way, way back, in the 
early days of amateur radio, 
hams built their own receivers 
and transmitters. There were on- 
ly a handful of hams then, so 
there wasn't enough of a market 
to warranl commerciai equip- 
ment for them, Then, when the 
first commercial receiver was 
put on the market, the home 
construction of receivers virtual- 
ly stopped. Hams quickly real- 
ized that a home*built project 
would cost more, have a smaller 
resale value, and not work as 
well as a commercial receiver. 
They did just what you and I 



122 73 Magazine • January. 1983 



would do in the circumstances: 
They bought their receivers. 

I came along just shortly after 
these halcyon days, getting 
started as a shortwave listener 
along about 1936 and doing my 
first pirate operating (called 
bootlegging then) in 1938. There 
were no practical transmitters 
for hams as of I hat time f there 
being only about 40,000 li- 
censes. These came along after 
WWII, when our ranks had 
swelled to about 80,000. But we 
did have some beautiful receiv- 
ers and the hams ate them up. 

As a teenager, I was living in 
Brooklyn and I made it my busi- 
ness to visit as many of the ac- 
tive hams as I could. In those 
days virtually every licensed 
ham was active. I visited well 
over a hundred hams and found 
just one who had built his own 
receiver. It really wasn't prac- 
tical from any viewpoint, 

Once transmitters got prac- 
tical, hams stopped building 
transmitters, . .with a few ex- 
ceptions. Weve always had a 
few strangeMhan-normal hams t 
but not many. I went the same 
route myself* buying war-sur- 
plus rigs and converting t'nem. I 
did build power amplifiers. . . 
but only because they weren't 
commercially available. 

Much of my own building was 
involved with complex RTTY 
gear, autocall circuits so that 
my RTTY coufd work automati- 
cally, and so on. Those of us 
building this sort of stuff were 
getting into digital electron 
ics. T .back in the late 40s - . .35 
years ago! 

But then t as now t we bought 
our rigs and receivers. Further, 
then, as now T when we bought 
our commercial equipment we 
went for the best and the newest 
we could get. This was only nat- 
ural since we were deeply in* 
volved with hamming and want 
ed to get the best out of the hob- 



by. Why would I go to the trouble 
of spending two weeks design- 
ing and building a piece of Tele- 
type" equipment and then hook 
it to a crummy receiver? No way! 
I went for the best and so did the 
rest of the buifders. They're stiff 
doing this. 

Today hams are building gad- 
gets and enjoying it. But you can 
bet that these active hams are 
also very particular about the 
commercial gear they buy. You 
can also bet that they are lying 
in wait for anything new that 
comes along, These chaps are 
the best of customers for the in- 
dustry because they are the 
most deeply involved. 

It is the older hams who al- 
ready have their KWM-2s who sit 
and rag-chew, who talk endless- 
ly on nets, who are the bane of 
the industry, not the enthusias- 
tic buiEders and experimenters. 
We are fortunate in that we do 
have a magazine in the ham field 
devoted to these nice old men t 
complete with pages and pages 
of "operating news" for them to 
read each month. 

When you consider what an 
incredible bargain ham gear is 
today, I get a bit aggravated 
when I hear someone griping 
about the high cost of it. Lordy! 
When I got started in hamming 
we had crystal-controlled trans- 
mitters and each crystal cost 
about $3.50, Not bad— until you 
translate that into 1983 dollar- 
ettes, which puts those nice lit- 
tle crystals at about $63 each, 

The cheapest hunk-of-junk 
ham receiver on the market, the 
Hallicrafters Sky Buddy, cost 
$19,50. Cheap? Weil r my friend, 
if we look at the comparable 
prices for other things, that 
comes to about $350 today. The 
average ham wanted something 
better, running around $80, or 
about $1,500 In today's puny 
money. 

No N we're getting incredible 



r> 



SATELLITE TV SYSTEMS 



"COMPARE OUR QUALITY. PRlt fiS AND SERVICE 

WE MANUFACTURE: 

J -\RAflOLIC: DJ5H£> 
POLAR MOUNTS 
Di: MO TRAILERS 
CUSTOM TARTS 
WE STOCK: 

WASHBLUN I .ILLASPIb 

KLM DRAKE 

AVANTEK La >WR ANCE 

GARDINER 

\LL, WRITE OR ** FOR OUR LATEST BROCHURE AND PRICES. 
AtSTTNi LEWIS LEWIS CONSTRUCTION CO 

K4C< PjO BOX 100 

W*7*H1*1 HUMBOLDT. IN WHi 

M JN BUSINESS AT THIS LOCATION SINCE J 9M" *"452 



MOTORIZATION SYS1 hMS 
LKA HOLDERS 
All MLM'M HORN> 



ALLlANl 1 

ATV 

■ \HI_k & ( ONN£< IORS 

SWTTCHfcS ,St HAKDWAKt 



bargains today as a result of the 
solid-state revolution, ICs t and 
mass production. Japan, with 
nearly one million licensed 
hams, has such a huge market 
for new ham gear that the pro- 
duction quantities have brought 
down the cost of manufacture to 
much less than one half what it 
would be without them. Each 
doubling of production normally 
drops the cost of manufacture 
about 15% or so. 

So, though we hams are build- 
ing more than ever before, we 
also are buying as much as we 
can get commercially made. , . 
and getting incredible value for 
our investment. 

ARE YOU MISSING THE DX? 

Now. I suppose I should shut 
my typewriter off and not lei you 
know what is going on. I've been 
sneaking around twenty meters 
lately and I want to let you know 
that you are missing out. The 
band has been super in recent 
weeks, and the DX is rolling in a! 
all hours of the day and night. 

Just in the last couple of 
days, I've had contacts with the 
following, to give you an idea: 
ZL2WM, ZL1VY, PY2CYT. 
PY1BFZ. HR1RBM, 7X2BK. 
VK6RU, IK7AGT, EZ7BXP t 4Z4JS. 
EA3CXG, N3RD/VP9, JX1JO, 
PY0ZZ, HH2MC, TU2HJ, 
PP6ACP, ZS1DG, ZS6WB, 



ZS4AF, PR7SSM, S83MMK T 
TU2LM t 2S6BR0. ZS6BNS, ZS4D, 
JY3ZH t JY4MB t JY5ZM, YI1BG0, 
7X5SI P LX1JAS, Y27FN, Y56FN. 
SM7DLZ, WB5VihUDU2. VK6CF. 
VS6CT, HL9RT, UA0JBN. 
EA9NG, U9H, UK0SBB, 8Q7AV. 
3BD8DB, OD5FB, HZ1AB. 
4S7EA. T32AF, F5RV/FC, VU9GI, 
VU9CK, ZL40Y/A, OH0W ... and 
so on. 

Besides some bragging about 
working DX, the above list is in- 
dicative of what you can do if 
you get on the air with a reason- 
ably good rig and antenna. It's 
there, with thousands of DX op- 
erators looking for you. While 
some put up with contest-style 
operating, whacking out the 
contacts for QSLs and the good 
old ARRL Honor Roll listings, 
most of them will stop this non- 
sense and be most interest- 
ing to talk with if you ask 
them some questions. Most of 
them love to talk... and they 
love most to talk about 1he most 
interesting subject in the 
whole world; themselves. 

Think what an impression 
hamming could make on inno- 
cent teenagers if they could 
hear us talking with Christmas 
Island out in the middle of the 
Pacific Ocean! Or some chap in 
Baghdad! They're there, looking 
for you, Where are you? 



LIMITED SPECIAL $555.00 



HHM 

20 MHz 

DUAL TRACE 



Oscilloscopes 




to T7\eei t'wry need 




MODEL HM-203 



WITH PROBES: x 1 ft x 10 

• ONE YEAR FULL WARRANTY 

•SOLID STATE 

• ASSEMBLED & CALIBRATED 
NEW RECTANGULAR CRT 

(603)434-5371 



DEALER OtfgUHUES INVITED 



RFD-3 




KXd&€>. 

DKRJtl HM. O3038 WARNER HILL 



n 




LINEAR 

R| Wr ^^ 5 to 

P 1000 WATT 

14 Different Models, 100 pgs 

. $11.95 

A. P. Systems g£^ 

Sox 263 sm. ^^ "* ie9 

Newport, Ri 02840 (401) 846 5627 



PL A 1 



+*$*e List of Advertisers on p*ge t u 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 123 



CIRCUITS 



Do you have a technique, modification, or easy-to-dupiicate cir- 
cuit that your fellow readers might be interested in? If so, send us a 
concise description of it (under two pages, doubie^spaced) and in- 
clude a cfear diagram or schematic it needed. 

In exchange tor these technical gems, 73 offers you the choice of 
a book from the Radio Bookshop, to be sent upon publication. Sub- 
mil your idea (and book choice} to: Circuits. Editorial Offices. 73 
Magazine. Peterborough NH 03458. Submissions not selected for 
publication wilt be returned it an SASE is enclosed, 



)/4« PHQttE jacks 

[)a 




1 



VIK.-PLUG l£ASJ 

■4 



_ 



5UBMW1 PLUG (MltfEt 



"STAR-SET' HEADSET CONVERSION: This adapter wilt enable you 
to use "Star-Set" headsets with an loom lC-2AT(or a similar HT). The 
IC-2AT has about 1-2 volts present in the mike fine to power an exter- 
nal elect ret condenser mike. This voltage is used to power the "Star- 
Set" as well. To key the PTT t you use the mike mute switch on the 
belt clip of the "Star-Set. " The PTT works by completing the mike cir- 
cuit, If you want to use the set on both the radio and a telephone, 
simply unplug ft. because no changes are made in the headset. Use 
shielded wire in the adapter to prevent rf feedback, If you don*t re- 
ceive anything, reverse the plugs, marking them after you have de- 
termined the proper placement. — Joe Eisenberg WA0WRI, Lincoln 





Fig. 1. 



Fig, 2. 



m 

£00 -50 on 
I #ATT 




4 * 



9vae 



4 fiVP f USE 



Pig. 3, 

UGHT-ACTIVA TED RE LA Y: Fig. 1 shows a circuit which will trip relay K1 when the light-sensitive resis- 
tor R1 is in the darkness. A buzzer can be attached to K1 to indicate that the fights have dimmed. Any 
small signal diode can be used for Dh which suppresses the high-current inductive kickback, thus pro- 
tecting Q2, Any NPN transistor can be used for Q1 and 02. R1 is a cadmium-sulphide resistor which has 
5 megohms resistance in darkness and 100 Ohms* in bright light. The resistor can be located away from 
the rest of the circuit. Fig, 2 is a light-activated relay; the same components are used as in Fig. 1. A po wer 
supply circuit is shown in Fig. 3. R1 is a one-Watt resistor valued between 200-500 Ohms.— A\an 
Weinberg KR7D, Tucson AJL 



CONVERTING THE DRAKE TR-? 
TO RECEIVE VLF WITHOUT 
THE AUX-7: This is a simple 
modification for the Drake TR*7 
which will enable the unit to re- 
ceive 0-to- 1,5 MH2, Open the unit 
and locate U90O3. Remove the 
wire from pin 14 of this IC Care- 
fully solder a 6,5-inch insulated 
hookup wire to pin 14 and con- 
nect the other end of the wire to 
the unused termtnai on the 
STORE switch. Replace the 
cover. To receive below 1.5 MHz, 
you must set the bandswitch to 
1<5> press STORE, press the 
DOWN switch once, and then re- 
lease the STORE switch. The 
UP/DOWN switch wilt now se- 
feet the VLF band in 15-MHz 
segments. Repeat the se- 
quence, and the unit will then 
tune 0-500 kHz. The antenna for 
I he lower bands should be con- 
nected to pin 7 on the accessor* 
fes connector (see pages 3-7 of 
the manual^ This modification 
does not affect the usual opera- 
tion of the STORE switch. —An- 
drew H. Kilpatrick K4YKZ, 
Long wood FL 




RIGID MALE-TO-MALE UHF CONNECTOR: Materials required are 
two PL-259 connectors, a straight length of no. 10 A WG 3-1/2 inches 
long, and a straight length of 3/8-inch o.d„ 5/1&inch id> copper tub- 
ing, 1-1/8 inches long. (You can find the tubing in the plumbing de- 
partment of many hardware stores.) After cutting the tubing, be sure 
to deburr the inside and outside edges of both ends. Then place 
PL-259s on either end, connecting the center pins with the no. W 
wire. Solder the assembly together using a large enough iron to 
avoid cold solder joints,— Gary Legel N6TQ, Fullerton CA. 

124 73 Magazine • January, 1983 





Building a TVRO receiver? 
Get a 4 Ghz signal down to 
70 Mhz the SIMPLE way... 

ICM RF DOWNCONVERTER 



Input filter for supenor performance 
and interference protection. Built-in 
DC block. Mounts near LNA in en- 
vironmental protective case. Con- 
verts 3.4-4.2 Ghz signal down to 
70 Mhz in two stages. 70 Mhz signal 
is fed to receiver at lower loss with 
RG-59or equivalent Standard input 
and output connectors for easy use 



International Crystal 
Manufacturing Company, Inc 

10 N. Lee, P.O. Box 26330, Oklahoma City, OK 73T26 



Can be used in multiple installations 
without need for isolators or other 
filters. 

Specifications; Conversion gain 25 
db nominal. Tuning voltage +4-16 
VOC nominal. Power requirements 
22 to 30 VDC €! 300 ma r {including 
LNA} Size 3"X4 , X7", weight 1 Lb 



^36 







MICROWAVE AND SATELLITE TELEVISION 






The standard RP downconverter package shown below 
gives you a proven 2150 Mhz d o wnconverte r mounted in a 
weathertioht antenna that features tow wind loading and 
easy installation . 

AN downconverters use mtcrostrip construction for long and 
reliable operation, A low noise microwave preamplifier Is 
used for pulling in weak signals. The downconverters also in- 
clude a broad-band output amplifier matched to 75 ohms. The 
RP model is recommended for up to 15 miles. Over the range 
of 15 to 25 miles the RP 4 which has a lower noise and higher 
gain RF amplifier stage, provides better television reception. 
For installations over 25 miles, an RPC unit which uses a sep- 
arate antenna is available. All models are transient voltage 
protected by surge protection on both the power supply and 
the converter inputs. All models are warranted for one year 



^~^.~*~- t -T-^-: +-k , ^ , t s * , 




fc 



! t 



The DCt 466 is a completely self-contained IMAGE REJEC- 
TION DOWN CONVERTER t hat is used for TVRO downconver- 

sion at the Satellite antenna where optimum signal to noise 
ratio can be obtained. The OCI 466 converts the TVRO band to 
70 Mhz, The units DC power and a 17 to 25 volt local oscillator 
tuning voltage are superimposed on a single RG 59 line for 
easy installation. The unit has an on board IF amplifier 
matched to 75 ohms that gives plenty of drive for long cable 
runs. The overall conversion gain is 25db, Image rejection is a 
minimum of 20 db. $300 in singles. 

Write for details on our low priced model VCO 40 voltage con- 
trolled oscillators in the four pin TO-8 package that cover the 
TVRO band. Also check our 120 degree low noise amplifier for 
tow cost satellite ground stations. 



INTEGRATED ELECTRONICS 

PO BOX 204 
CARLISLE MA 01741 

617-369-0536 •"*« 




r 



SALE SALE SALE 



GOINGOUT-OF- 
BUSINESS SALE 

Last Day- Dec 31 ST 

1982 

CALL US! 

If we have what you want in stock 
we will beat ANYONE'S price and 
ship it FREE! 

No charge cards . . 
cash or cashier's check 



Ben Franklin Electronics 
1 1 5 Vt N. Main Hillsboro KS 67063 

316-947-2269 ^ 43 g 



FROM TAYCO... 

MAGNAV0K FV25 - 26 CHANNEL 



end REMOTE CONTROL 

• 







Get The Most From Cable TV 

VHF-MDBANDSUPERBAND 

e Sated any channel with easy pushbutton turwig 

from up to 25 sway » Perfect tor the bedroom TV 

• Seve* wear on TV lunar - amid coetty repairs 

• Ideal tor the handicapped • Easy 5 nfcnufe nstaftftUon 

• Recedes the** EXTRA charmers yow TV cent gat 

• Works with any TV # 90 Day Guarantee 



MaJ Order SPECIAL 

94B.SS 

+ 4,2S^PfHna 



2 way Sptiler 219 
TFitUngs 23*e - W. t.BO 
Balden R&50 .It, ti 

24 Hour Order Line NYS Add Ta* 
(607) 962-7313 Buy 2 - We Pay Shipp*n fl 

Order Direct From COD. s - StSO extra 

TAYCO COMMUNICATIONS 

R3 t46A Narrows Ck. Rd - Corning N,V 14030 



CONTACT-80 . . . 

An ultra sophisticated yet simple to 
operate RTTY System for ihe demanding 
operator at an affordable price. 

Postures* 

•Oil* I/O; SAVE, LOAD. KILL ft Dl* 

• TR} SPLIT screen, user defined 
M0 CANNED MESSAGES 
•DYNAMIC BUFFER ALLOCATION. . , 
•Live HAROCOPY for parallel printer*. . 
•Keyboard CONTROL of STATION . 
•AUTO-ID; RTTY. CW faeleclable ON/OFF). , , 

• CLOCKED OUTPUT rate . . 

•All BAUDOT speeds plua ASCII (110). . . 

• NAME, DATE, TIME from computer . . 
*On «cre*n BIT PATTERN SCOPE . , 

fteqwrvs TRS&Q, MOO-tli with your CALL SIGN 
pfus W with fflma loop. 

OtSK I/O; VERSION. $279.00 

CASSETTE UO: VERSION. . . 5229.00 



CommTek 



Postpaid 



150 



4493 Orleans Dr. T Dun woody, GA 30338 
(404)948-9314 



^See List of Advertisers on page 1 14 



73 Magazine * January t 1983 125 




REVIEW 




ELECTRONIC RAINBOW 

SATELLITE TELEVISION 

RECEIVER KIT 

Like a lot of hams who have developed 
an Interest In satellite TV, I have been 
reading about and watching the market 
for the last couple of years for a satellite 
receiver that had all Ihe features I waited 
and the fight price as well. Most ©J these 
factory- wired units" price tags si ill hung 
up there in the high dollar range, while Kits 
lor these receivers were few and did nol 
enjoy the best publicity from articles I had 
read. I felt a kit was the best means to 
meet my end, Having built Quite a variety 
of electronics kits and semi-kits down 
through the years, I felt that I could handle 
a quality kit without too much difficulty. 

Browsing around the hamfest at India- 
napolis back in July, 1 spotted a few satel- 
lite antennas set up around ihe area and 
visited each booth lo check out their 
wares. Most of Ihe equipment was fac- 
tory-assembled, high-priced, turn-key 
stuff, not for me Then I happened by the 
booth where Electronic Rainbow was 
showing ils latest offering to the industry. 
The owner Ron Boss and I had met at van 
ous hamfesisand I knew he handled qual- 
ity products. Ron had his sal el lite receiver 
hooked up and It had a crisp, clear picture, 
I checked the spec and price sheets he 
had on hand and was very impressed with 
the features his satellite kit offered, litce 
built-in rf modulator, detent tuning, vari- 
able audio from 5,5 to 7-5 MHz. arc, LNA 
power supply, remote tuning jacks and 

Photos by 



baseband Jacks for the optional remote 
tuning control, and stereo decoder along 
with many other features found only on 
mucti htgher-pneed units 

1 ashed Ron if the units were available 
yet and he said In a couple of weeks. They 
were presently getting the assembly man- 
ual ready for the printers I left with an or- 
der f orm and spec sheet so I could review 
the receiver and make up my mind at 
home. About a week later, I sent my order 
i r i for the kit and looked forward to getting 
started on my very own satel I Ite TV receiv- 
ing system. 

A few weeks went by and f decided tocall 
Ron and check on my order. He loW me that 
they were just about ready to Ship the 
units with a photocopied manual because 
Ihe printer did not have ihe final rnanu< 
scripts yet. 

I immediately saw a chance to get my re- 
ceiver quicker and help oui Ron with con> 
merits from the consumer poml of view, I 
suggested that il he could sell me a receive* 
right away. I would be happy to give him 
some feedback on the assembly of the 
units from a builders standpoint Ron ac- 
cepted my offer and I picked up my receiver 
the neit day. 

After sorting through tne kit and check- 
ing parts {a few were missing as we both ex- 
pected!, 1 dove inio the manual and read It 
from cover to cover, picking out minor er 
rors and missing points thai would help a 
builder do a better job of assembly and en 
sunng that *he umt would wonk upon com 
pleiion I have had a few bad experiences 
with Kits where even experienced builders 

David Beighio! 





The completed Electronic Rainbow satellite TV receiver Atrtght ts the downconverter unit, 
which ts mounted at the antenna 



would pull their hair out Irying to figure out 
the sequence of assembly. This Is not the 
case with the Electronic Rainbow satellite 
receiver kit. I found the manual to be very 
easy to follow: Were was vefy little chance 
for error in the step-by-step assembly of 
this quality receiver kil 

Fortunately, I had a week's vacation 
coming and I decided to use It to put to- 
gether my kit I was able lo assemble me kit 
In approximately 15 to 20 hours, making nu- 
merous hips lo Electronic Rainbow for 
changes in the manual and a few parts that 
were missing or wrong, 

1 completed (he receiver and was looking 
forward to checking It out on Ron's anten- 
na* since I did not nave one yei, The final 
alignment was to be done with an actual 
picture from the satellite. The roceivet kit 
had all the sections, such as Ihe 70-MHz 
filler, ihe remole downconverter h and OSCfl- 
lator pre-wlred and tested, so final align- 
ment was a simple matter of adjusting the 
picture, sound, and rf modulator under op- 
era! ing condi t ions accord i no to 1 he step-tsy- 
step instructions in the manual using a 
VOM to check power-supply voltages. 

Even though the main board of the re- 
ceiver has all the parts on it, the board is di- 
vided into six sections with each of the sec- 
tions having an A and B pari for very easy 
assembly AIM he parts are in zip lock bags 
for each of the sections of the board, mak- 
Ing il much easier to find them. 

I had to wait a week or so for Ron's de- 
sign engineer. Paul Turner, to return Jrom 
vacation, so tils ace assembler. Terri Muc* 
pfry, and t finished off the few changes rn 
the manual When the final printing came 
back from Ihe printer, she could add all the 
changes to complete end update Ihe line- 
quality manual, which was all Ihe individual 
sections shown in halftones, making place- 
ment of the parts on tne silk-scfeened 
boards a simple matter. 

Finally, when Paul relumed, Ron ashed 
me over to his shop and the receiver was 
hooked up along with my down con verier to 
the bench monitor when Paul flipped ihe 
monitor onto channel 3, there was the pk> 
lure from transponder 11 MTV, clear as a 
bell I was really happy that the unit worked 
the first time. Paul made his way through 
the Individual trimmers for each of the 24 
channels (transponders), peaking and ad- 
justing the sound for a perfect picture on 
eacft He let the unit bum in for about 30 
minutes to be Sure everything was okay and 
then put the cover back on the very attrac- 
tive cabinet, Off I went like a kid with a new 
toy, proud as could be that my kit was final 
ty ready to go. 

In conciusion T I am sure that the Bee 
Ironic Rainbow satellite TV receiver hit wtii 
be a popular item for I hose builders who 
have waited so long for just such a product. 

I plan to use my receiver with a Wilson MD 

II B antenna. Locom LNA. Chap per a! super 
feed. ami Beachcraft polarizer I will be glad 
to answer any questions about any of these 
items. Please write only and include a sell- 
ad dressed stamped envelope 

The complete satellite TV receiver kit 
costs $39500 For further information on 
the receiver, board kit or manual, contact 
Ron Ross of Paul Turner at Electronic flam 
bow, tne. 6254 LaPas Tmri Indianapolis IN 
46268, (3T?>29?.7262 Reader Service n urn 
Per 477. 

J. E Beightoi Jr. WB9ZNU 
Indianapolis IN 



ADVANCED COMPUTER 

CONTROLS' MODEL RC-850 

REPEATER CONTROLLER 

Imagine. H you will, the amateur repeat- 
er that Vm about to describe. It can be con- 
trol led via telephone, over a UHF control 
link, through the main repeater receiver, 



and, of course, locally at the repeater site 
All you need is a louchtone^M encoder 
and the necessary codes. 

If you call the repeater on the tele- 
phone, it answers the phone (with a mes- 
sage you've chosenj and waits ten sec- 
onds to receive a valid command. After 
you enter a code, the repeater verifies in 
votce over the telephone the Junction that 
has been selected. It does the same If you 
enier a command through the mam 
receiver, except that the acknowledge- 
ment comes back to you over the air. 

If you want to check your louchtone 
pad, you only need to enter a lesi prefix 
followed by a series of keys. The repeater 
reads your entry sequence back to vou. 
again fcn voice And that's only the begin- 
ning of what the repeater will do for you it 
can evaluate received signals for trequen 
cy error, deviation, and percent quieting 
and give a similar voice response back to 
the user. Maybe you would like to check 
conditions at the repeater site from the 
comfort of your favorite armchair No 
problem at all. Just ask the right ques- 
tions with your touchtone pad and Ihe 
repeater can give you voltage and power 
output measurements and also the 
temperature at the site. It wilt even give 
you Jhe time of dayi 

This only begins to describe the fea- 
tures of this particular repeater. Whose 
repeater is it? It could very easily be yours, 
Just by interfacing your present repeater 
with the RC &50 repeater controller being 
manufactured by Advanced Computer 
Controls ol Cupertino. Call forma And 
please, don't be put off by Ihe word 'inter- 
facing, 11 because in this case you can ac- 
cess most of the features of Ihe controller 
tust by feeding a carrier-operated switch 
for relay! logic signal and audio from your 
receiver into it and by letting the con- 
troller feed audio into your transmitter 
along with a push-to-talk logic signal. 
Plug the controller's modular (ack Into a 
telephone line at your repeater site, sup 
ply n with 12 volts dc, adjust one or two 
audio levels, and you will be able to put 
much of the power of the controller to 
work lor you right away. 

Naturally, other connections need to be 
made between the controller and the re- 
peater station In order for it to provide re- 
ceived signal reports and other voice re- 
sponse telemetry (VRT) information about 
the repeater itself. You can even connect 
Ihe controller's logic outputs to a synthe- 
sized transceiver and operate a remote 
base station, complete with frequency 
selection, through you* repeater This 
makes it simple to link up with another re- 
peater tor nets or public-service activities 

Software- Based 

The controller Uselt, even without the 
synthesized voice capability, offers tea- 
tures which lo my knowledge are not 
available in any other commercially -man' 
ufactured controller or repeater/con I roller 
combination. The key to the power of this 
unit, and the thing that enables ACC to ex- 
pand the controller s features on a contin- 
uing basis, is thai it is sof! ware-based (or, 
to be technical, firm ware-based m Ihe 
form of several EPROMs). New releases of 
the operating system software can en- 
hance the capabilities of your machine, in 
many cases without any additional wiring 
or work on your part beyond changing out 
the EPROMs It also makes it possible for 
the manufacturer to incorporate inio the 
controller some additional feature which 
may be very important to you 

Tne Blue Knob ftepeater Association, 
which sponsors the highest amateur re- 
peater in Pennsylvania (147.751,15 MHz}, 
had a special problem which AGO was 
able to solve Ihrough a small amount ot 



126 73 Magazine • January. 1983 




The RC-85Q repeater controtter from Advanced Computer Controls, 



additional programming (which then be- 
came available lo every user of the con- 
troller through an upgraded release of the 
softwares. Most of us are familiar with just 
dialing (or pressing! the number "1" to ac- 
cess the nationwide long distance tele- 
phone network However there is a fairly 
rural telephone system operating at our 
site on Blue Knob Mountain, and II re- 
quires entering "1121" lo make a long-dis- 
tance call. Couple this w»1ti the fad that 
most of our members live outside the lo- 
cal calling area from (he exchange at the 
site and you've got a cumbersome number 
of digits to enter when operating mobile, a 
number which can rise to 14 digits m order 
to place a call outside our own area code. 
vVhat made this even worse was ihe fact 
that while the controller has the capability 
to store up to 90 telephone numbers m its 
user autodialer and 10 numbers in its 
emergency autodialer (these numbers can 
then be called Just by entering an access 
prefix plus two digits), the storage loca- 
tions are limited to 11-digll numbers at 
most. This would present no problem for 
the typical long-distance number, but It 
would have severely limited the 
usefulness of the autodialers in our 
system. Ed tngber WAfJAXX, who founded 
ACC, solved the problem jusi by program* 
ming ihe controlfer to "see"' a leading "1" 
and substitute an alternate sequence 
when the number is dialed out (in our 
case, "1121'"), This small change, which 
was relatively easy to handle by mod i lying 
software, would have been far more 
ficuit, if not impossible, in a hardware- 
based system. 

The controller's autopatch. which is 
logically separated into three different 
components {basic autopatch, user auto- 
dialer, and emergency autodialer} Is ex- 
tremely advanced in design. Phone num- 
bers are read back to the user for confir- 
mation (in voice with the voice-response 
option installed, and otherwise m CW) 
before a ~ call is placed The controller 
itself enters the number Into the landline 
system In your choice often pulses per se- 
cond, twenty pulses per second, or stan- 
dard touch tones. This greatly increases 
the reliability of the autopatch, since 
tones are not being passed from many dif- 
ferent users louchtone pads directly into 
ihe telephone system. 

The user autodialer codes can be pro- 
grammed hy the members themselves, or 
the user autodialer can be 'locked 44 so 
that only control operators can load and 
change the telephone numbers to be 
stored The access prefix for the autodial- 
er can also be changed il and when 
necessary. 

The emergency autodialer provides tor 
the storage ol 10 public-service telephone 
numbers and associated response mes- 
sages for each agency *such as 'Fire'l 

With ihe voice-response option, the re- 
verse autopatch (which requires entering 
a code sequence after calling the repeater 



on the telephone) can actually call a 
repealer user by caiisign Forty cat I signs 
can be stored in the controller's memory 
for use with these directed reverse 
autopatch calls (or as pan of a demonstra- 
tion message* 

Separate timers can be set tor each 
type of autopatch call, and the three func- 
tions can be enabled or disabled 
separately. This can be used as a way of 
allowing emergency calls lo be placed ai 
night, white the other autopatch functions 
might be turned off A programmable ac- 
tivity timer functions with all autopatch 
calls to drop the patch it no activity lor 
constant keying) comes (rom the repeater 
user for the designated period of time. 

It's also possible lo pJace a full duplex 
autopatch call (for simultaneous receiv- 
ing and transmitting! and a semi-private 
patch where the repeater- user side of the 
conversation is not fed through to the 
transmitter, cut instead is replaced with a 
"cover tone" to alert other users that a 
call Is In progress. It your repeater suffers 
the misfortune of having someone mali- 
ciously dropping the autopatch on legiti- 
mate users, you can program the control- 
ler to allow each user to define his or her 
own custom hangup code just before 
placing a call, Then, only that code or the 
control operator's override code will ter- 
minate the call. 

Long-distance calls can be prohibited 
on the mam autopatch, which then allows 
the entry of a 7-digrf number only, which 
cannot begin with H 't" or "0/* There is 
even an 'antrdiaier/' whrch can be loaded 
with up to five telephone numbers which 
may not be called on the autopatch (such 
as a local pizza parlor?). 

One convenience which anyone who 
has ever used an autopatch will appreci- 
ate is that the controller will give the time 
and date for you automatically upon com- 
pletion of a cat I. Tnrs is also very helpful to 
ihe repeater owner tor the proper logging 
of autopatch calls 

Identification. Please 

The controller handles repeater Idem if i 
cation requirements in a similarly sophis- 
ticated manner. An 'intelligent" ID algo- 
rithm directs ine unit s handling of several 
different ID messages in accordance with 
the activity on the machine. For example, 
if the repeater has been dormant and is 
ihen keyed up. an initial fD (typically a 
voice greeting) is given As time pro- 
g re sses Irom the miual keying of the re- 
peater and with a QSO in progress, the 
controller will wait for an opportunity to ID 
again when a user lets the repeater carrier 
drop, tf this opportunity doesn't occur, 
then the unit becomes anxious to ID, but 
will still try to avoid IDIng over the top of a 
user transmission But. if ten minutes 
pass without even a break in the QSO, 
then the controller will do a forced CW ID 
over the too of Ihe user, but at a fast un- 
obtrusive level - 




tntertor view ot the RC-850. 



With ihe voice- response option, you 
can use the buUttn message editor, either 
on site or remotely* to program the mes 
sages you want for IDs and other re- 
sponses The controller has a vocabulary 
of over 200 letters, numbers, words, and 
sound effects. You can even have custom 
words, such as your g roups name or loca- 
tion, merged into your controller's soft- 
ware, but these words are not cheap at 
S200each t 

Probably the second most remarkable 
feature of the RG-85Q (I'll save the first 
one for later) is that all of your repealers 
operating parameters, Including timers, 
courtesy tones <you can select from eight 
sets that you program yourself}, mes- 
sages, autodial numbers, control opera 
tor and user codes, ami even an initial 
power-up configuration ffei case power to 
the una is temporarily rosth can be 
changed remotety. 

Non-Votaiile Memory 

If you're like me, you're wondering now 
what happens to all of that information 
stored in the controller, including the 90 
user autodialer numbers and to emergen- 
cy autodialer numbers, if power to the 
controller does fail. Incredibly, absolutely 
none of this data is lost, because it has 
been stored in EEPROMs (Electrically 
Erasable Programmable Read Only Mem- 
ory^ by the controller's own built-in pro- 
grammer/eraser. The controller will 
"awaken" according to the configuration 
you ve programmed as soon as power re 
turns. And, by the way, battery backup cir- 
cuitry is included Eh the unit. 

Other standard features include several 
modes of operation based upon a subaud 
ibie tone Input, touch tone up/down ac- 
cess by users with programmable auto- 
matic timeout, logic outputs for remote 
control of other devices (complete with re- 
sponse messages to indicate their func- 
tion in your system), provfsions tor a con- 
trof receiver, a kerchunker filter that can 
be switched on or off. spare audio Inputs, 
lone signalling, and a host of others liter- 
ally too numerous to mention in this 
review. 

One extremely clever feature of the con- 
troller is that it suppresses the squelch 
tails of user transmissions (which makes 
listening comfortable tor users and con- 
trol operators alike) and also, at your op- 
tion, I ouc M ones It does this through the 
use of a 75-ms analog delay line which al- 
lows the controller to cut off audio to (he 
transmitter when the earner-operated 



switch signal disappears or when touch 
tones are properly decoded by the state 
oMhe-art Mitel chip set. Without actually 
hearing it operate, it s hard to believe how 
effective this circuitry realty *s 

Construction 

A review of a product such as this one 
wouldn't be complete without some de- 
scription of how it's constructed, I can 
honesily sum it up with one word: impres- 
sive. Machine-contact IC sockets, fully 
sealed, are used throughout the control- 
ler, Signal connectors are gold on gold for 
long-term reliability, The circuit boards 
are computer-grade glass epoxy with 
through plate holes. They are solder- 
masked and si Ik -screened with compo- 
nent designations And. finally, low-cur- 
rent CMOS circuitry provides highly effi- 
cient operation. 

Product Support 

Another Important plus is that the device 
Js fully documented with a comprehensive 
owner's manual which includes a descrip- 
tion of the unit, how to install it. how to op- 
erate it, service and maintenance inf Dona- 
tion, and schematics arid parts placement 
drawings The manual makes liberal use of 
figures and tables. It's clearly written, but 
don't expect lo skim through it once or 
twice and completely understand the 
operation of the controller. Careful reading 
is necessary due to the many advanced 
features of theumt. 

From my own experience, however, by 
tar the most impressive support for the 
product comes from the designer himself, 
Ed Ingber WA6AXX Is an electronics engi- 
neer, and his background (which Includes 
a Master's Degreei lies primarily In de- 
signing test equipment, programming mi- 
crocomputers, and working w«th speech 
synthesis I have been able to reach him 
by telephone (he provides owners with 
both hts factory and home numbers) any 
time our group has needed information or 
assistance. 

I mentioned earlier that I would save the 
most remarkable feature of the controller 
for last, wmch is thai tt worts tv$t tike the 
manual says it wj/Uihe manual can be pur- 
chased by itself for S30J, and it sounds ter- 
rific on the air. The speech synthesis is so 
good that during the first few days that we 
had the controller on-line, we actually had 
people responding to the female '"Good 
Morning" greeting with a complete run* 
down of their name, location, and other in- 
formation, only to be tremendously sur- 



73 Magazine • January. 1983 127 



prised to learn that they had been talking 
to a computer! 

Few Problems 

In our controller, problems we re hard to 
find, and ! heard essentially the same 
thing from other owners before we made 
our decision to purchase one. Our unit 
was 3hipped with an interim version o* the 
control ler's operating system software 
designated as 1.4 X. and this version did 
have a few bugs in it. One example was 
that gtvrng the controller the code to dis- 
able the au top a ten rimer disabled the 
auto patch ftsell. Another bug caused two 
of the front-panel display LED indicators 
to be reversed- in a way, though, these 
problems actually point out the strengths 
of a software based device, because the 
final release ol Wis version of the soft- 
ware corrected both of these glitches. 

If you haven't guessed by now that the 
price tag Tor one of these controllers is pret 
ly hefty, then you might consider pnee 
alone to be a drawbacks Actually, the 
RC-850 controller comes in a number of dif 
ferent con figurations, ranging m price from 
$1 195 for an assembled and tested control 
circuit board only up to nearly $2800 for the 
maximum system, which includes an FCC 
registered telephone interface, voice-re- 
sponse telemetry option, and Irani -panel 
display option, all contained m a rack 
mount cabinet ready to Install at your re 
peater site. There are also several versions 
belween these two extremes. For example* 
you may want to provide your own tele- 
phone interface, which reduces the cost ol 
the unit by S349, Or, whtle you might want 
to have synthesized voice IDs and the time' 
of-day dock, you may not really need the 
16-qhannei analog measurement and 
speech-read back capability provided by the 
complete VRT option This would also re- 
duce the cost of the controller And, il's 
good to know that you can start out small 
and expand to a maximum system at a later 
time with very little difficulty, since Ihe con* 
trol board has been designed to be upward 
compatible. 

If you want to significantly enhance 
your repeater s capabilities and at the 
same time Infuse your organization with 
new enthusiasm and excitement, the 
RC-650 repeater com roller may well be 
lust what you're looking fort 



For more information, contact Advanced 
Computer Controls. 10816 Northrtdge 
Square, Cupertino C A 950 14; (406^53-8085 
Reader Service number 476. 

Gerald R Patton WA3VUP 
Duncans vi He PA 



LJM2RK STORM ALERT 



My wife does not like ham radio. She 
despises the funny noises my radio 
mahes, and she would really rattier it 
didn't ride in the car with us. So, I find my 
self and my rig relegated (or maybe I 
should say "banished") to a remote cor- 
ner of the basement. 

Now, I don't mind being m the base- 
ment, but rm an Army officer whose spe- 
cially is tanks. That means, after years oi 
firing lank guns on various ranges in com- 
bat, Prn rather hard of hearing Conse- 
quently. I canl near when someone is call- 
ing me unless I'm right at the radio, and, 
while I'm a pretty avid ham |my wile thinks 
loo avid), 1 do occasionally go upstairs to 
gel a cup of coffee ot take care of the 
effects of an earlier cup. So, I've been 
looking for months *or a simple (and at* 
fordablei tone decoder 1 could put on the 
two-meter rig to alert me to calls I needed 
io be able to set up a visible signal to alert 
me when I was copying CW traffic on the 
HF bands (since I wear headphones to muf* 
fie the sound of the "mllT), and an au- 
dible alarm to call me when I was else- 
where in the bouse l atso needed to mute 
the audio, since my wile does not have 
a hearing problem and would have fits on 
those occasions when the repeater was 
really busy. 

It didn't take me long to find that a atrrv 
pie tone decoder, even if you elect to |ust 
buy the parts and home-brew it yourself , 
isn 1 all that cheap, while ready-made or 
kit decoders are downright unreasonable 
($50.00 plus is the normal ranges I had fl 
nally decided the only way out was to 
home-brew one, with the attendant costs 
involved m making a circuit board and the 
costs in time to construct it when I hap- 
pened lo stop at a harnfest in Lafayette. 
Indiana. 

At one of the booths, a guy (whose 
name I never did gel l was demonstrating 
something that caused alarms to sound 



:-*♦ 



'c*— ?H 



AUDIO 
INPUT 



»2 



Cut 

-31 



and strobe Ugh! 3 to flash. Intrigued, I 
stopped to watch what turned out to be a 
demonstration of exactly the thing I'd 
been looking for. 

He was demonstrating a tone de- 
coder—he called it the "UM2RK Storm 
Alert"— in nine different configurations. 
Each of the nine circuit boards was at 
tached to a big board and encn was wired 
for a different option. All nine were essen- 
tially the same— only a few jumper wires 
were different The same boatd, ICs b resis- 
tors, etc. were used in each one, and each 
was constructed exactly the same, except 
for the jumpers. When the guy running the 
show told me they cost only Si 5.00, I 
picked up i wo. 1 had already proven that 
parts alone would cost that (not counting 
the cost of constructing a circuit board 
and my time to find all the parts). 

Once I got home, It took me about 45 
minutes to build the first one, most ol that 
time spent locating the parts on the 
board. The second otic took about 20 
minutes For such a little company, the kit 
Is a real joy to build The written instruct 
tions, while not elaborate, are more than 
adequate, and the circuit board is beauh 
fully silk screened with both a drawing of 
the component and its reference number 
(fit, C3 t etc i Orientation of every polar- 
ized part is shown on the bo&fd and refer- 
enced in the instructions. 

In only one case are the instructions a 
little remiss. Two ol ihe LEDs nave to be 
mounted with nylon spacers |i( you use 
me company enclosure). The instructions 
mention thai m pawing, but when you go 
down the list of parts to install, as the in- 
structions suggest, the spacers are hated 
welt after the LEDs. It would be wise to 
wnte irt "spacer" next to the LED 1 1 sung, 
a II hough »i won't damage the operat ton of 
the device even if you forget the spacer It 
just won I (it as neatly in She enclosure. 

Once the boards are finished, aligning 
them is even simpler than budding ihem. 
Ftrst L apply an audio source to the decod- 
er. If you use one of the Metheny enclo- 
sure kits. Ihai simply means plugging the 
thing into ihe speaker jack, Then attach a 
power lead and have someone generate a 
tone- I did mine by hooking my HT into a 
dummy load and the decoder into my Wii- 



■ u 



-ji 



• z 



Hr- 



0** 



SS7 



<W 



C20 



- - 






CIS 

41- 






4P 



€46 



IC lb 
1ST 



RIB 



aiiB 



+-* 



POWER 

INPUT 

12-HVDC 

rti 



\\m 



▼,01 

T 1 f 



IDZ 




0CCQCE 




Ri 



RS 



CT 




DECODE 
1-n. 







J6 



«-j *hT^ 




ee 

-*j — * 



L 



-E-" - 



41- 



BEL AT OUTPUt 



C 



H7 



A 

'a 



-J! 



1^7 



Fig, T. Schema ttc 






son WE^BQO. If that is not sufficient at- 
tenuation of the signal, leave the antenna 
Oil the receiving unit or attach it to a dum- 
my load. At any rate, that hookup atten- 
uated my iQG-mvV signal enough to allow 
me to align the decoder A buddy at the 
other end of the repeater can do the same 
I of you. H you'd rather. 

Transmit the tones you want rj used the 
number §. since the local RACES net uses 
that as an alert signal) and adjust a simple 
pot for tone B til's wet I marked on the 
board) unfit an LED on the board lights. 
{They have thoughtfully provided this LED 
just for alignment.) Then, still applying the 
tone, adjust the pot for tone A until 
another LED comes on tyouli be able to 
see this LEO even after you put the device 
In the enclosure} The decoder is now 
aligned and all you have left lo set is the 
delay. Another III lie pol allows you to set 
in a delay so the decoder will not do its 
thing until the tone(s| you choose have 
been applied for whatever time you want I 
use one second, but you can go frorr 
slant on to a very long delay. 



Electronically, the device is equally 
simple, it uses two 567 tone decoder ICs. 
one to control each tone and then feeds 
them to an LM7402N quad 2-inpul NOR 
gale. Each 56? *s adjusted to one of the re- 
quired tones by varying a single potenti- 
ometer (you could easily change the fre- 
quency range by modifying the value of 
Ihe capacitor on the circuit, but since the 
thing already operates on all the i ouch- 
lone™ and likely PL* frequencies, you 
will need to do that only if you use really 
exotic tones}. When the first 567 is trig- 
gered, it lights an LED and signals one of 
the LM7402 cates. which waits lor the 
ne*l 567 to decode the other tone twhen 
ng the two-tone option}. Once the sec 
ond lone appears, the gate opens, lights a 
second LED (labeled "decoding" on the 
Metheny enclosure), and provides (he log- 
ic state that causes the LM7402 to acti- 
vate ihe delay and. finally the relay 
either tone is removed too soon, the delay 
resets. Once activated, the relay does 
whatever you wired it to do h the usual task 
being to connect the speaker to the audio 
line. All Ihe components, save the circuit 
board, are generally available at well- 
stocked Radio Snack stores, so repairs 
should be especially easy The Metheny 
enclosure also has a couple of welt- 
placed mounting holes in It to allow at- 
tachment of the power source and an ey 
temal relay, dnven by the onboard relay. 

Now. let's see what else this thing will 
do, It has an onboard relay, so the control 
possinihlies are almost unlimited. You 
can have It take two tones (slandard 
touchtones) to open the audio on your 
transceiver so the thing stays quiet until 
you are called Of you can have the re 
sound an alarm or turn something on or 
otl (great possibilities for a repeater sys 
tern). Metheny even provides a suggestion 
for a simple timing circuit that will auto- 
matic ally reset your decoder after a preset 
delay. You can also set it up so one tone 
turns it on and anoiher turns it off, or one 
tone turns it on and leaves it on. Delays 
can be worHed on bolh ends. It can also be 
set up 10 turn on with a subaudlbie tone 
and oft when the tone is removed- And. by 
changing a single resistor, you can use 
t2-V-dc T fr-V-dc, or 6-V-dc power sources. 
All the required controls mount right on 
the board and are included In the Kit 

You can also do a number ol other 
things not mentioned in the Metheny in- 
structions — your imagination wilt be your 
only real limitation. With two boards, you 
can use one dual tone to turn a device on 
and another to turn it off (retaining all Ihe 



128 73 Magazine • January, 1983 





7805 (-LM340T-5) 


75 


.68 


,56 


7612 (LM340T-12) 


75 


.68 


56 


7815 (LM340T-15J 


75 


J68 


56 


7818 (LM340T-18) 


.75 


68 


5o 



Gotland 
EcfcroniQ 

Microprocessor & Interface 

177.1 24 50 6&4& 12 95 DAO0800 3,93 

1 791 34 95 6B50 4.49 IM5S250 14 90 

21UCI? 149 806 bA 8.95 MM581G7 127« 

jllj 165 8212 2 75 TMS99O0 29 95 

2518 4.75 B214 3 95 TB1602B 2*9 

2512 7 95 821© 2-75 SC-Oi 55 00 

2651 12.35 8224 3 29 2BQA-CPU fM 

4044 L- 2 2 49 322 fc 2 79 ZSOACTC 7 49 

6SG2 8 99 8226 4 49 2BOAD*r 1SS5 

6800 6 99 S25- 5 95 ZBOAPlO 7 49 

6602 1195 82S5 6 49 ZB0A&O 1795 

6809 1995 AVS'10134 4 95 26603 74 95 

6S21 . .. 4.95 A¥5-23?6 12 39 ZHBJl 29 95 

1 Amp TO-220 Voltage Regulators 

PART* 1-24 25-99 I0f>499 

i 

1 
1 

Linear Integrated Circuits 

8036 3 95 LM393 97 MC3302 90 

L^351 75 LM733 99 MCI4H 59 

LF353 1-29 LM741^B 35 MO 51 4 i 39 

LF357 1 39 LM741-14 35 ME55S 45 

LM301 45 LM747 77 NB56 96 

LM307 49 LM74B 49 NE565 1 25 

LM311 95 LMHtO 169 NE&534 199 

LM3ia 1 75 LM1456 69 NE5S38 2.25 

LM324 .90 LM1B00 2 49 SSM2010 . 7 50 

LM339 ?9 J-M161B 3 49 SSM2020 7 50 

LM351 90 LM1BB9 2 99 &SM2O30 7 50 

LM377 2 49 (JWI2SD0 69 SSM2040 7 50 

LVI380N-14 1.25 LM3900 69 SSM2044 5 ?S 

IM3B1 189 LM3905 49 5SM20S5 6 50 

LM3B3 3 29 UM3914 3 79 XR2206 5 19 

LM394 1 95 LM3915 3 79 XM138 99 

LM366 99 LM3916 3 79 XR4741 195 

LM387 1 49 LM4500 3 29 X«SS8 I 99 

5% Carbon Film Resistors 

We stock all 5% standard values between 
1 Ohm and 1 Meg Ohm. 

% Watt 

Package of 5 20 

Package of 1 00 (one value) > « 1 50 

Package of 1000 |one value) 9 75 

% Watt 

Package of 5 25 

Package of 1 00 (one value) I -76 

Package of 1000 (one value) - T5.00 

Sampler box consisting of 5 each of all 169 
standard 5% values between 1 Ohm and 10 
Meg Ohm {845 pieces totalf. 
V* Watt Sampler Box 25.00 

Vs Watt Sampler Box . , , . « . . . 28.00 

We Also Stock Vi Watt Resistors 

1% Vi Watt Metal Film Resistors 

We now stock all 481 Standard EiA values 
between 10 Ohms and 1 Meg Ohm. 

Package of 5 - 45 

Package of 100 (one value) ........ 5.50 

Bo* of 1000 (one value) ... . ;- . 28.00 

Send for our full Ime catalog of ICs. Resistors. 
Capacitors. Diodes, Regulators, Crystals. Trim 
Pots. Switches, Sockets, Connectors, RF 
Chokes, and more. 

Minimum Order £10,00 
Shipping 

10-24,99 3 00 Above 50 00 FREE 

25-49 99 ... 150 COD Add 1 50 

WESTLAND ELECTRONICS 

37387 Ford Rd • Westland. Ml 48185 
Order Line - 1 800-521 -0664 
In Michigan^ 313-728-0650 



Announcing 



NEW AUTOPATCH 




PRIVATE PATCH 

Introducing Private Patch. A giant step 
forward in non-sampling Autopatch/ 
Interconnect technology, capability and 
standard features. Our revolutionary 
new techniques of audio and digital 
signal processing offer several 
advantages over conventional sampling/ 
scanning type Autopatches: 1. The 
annoyance of continuous squelch tails 
is totally eliminated. Makes 
conversation much more natural and 
enjoyable. 2. In addition to superb 
simplex capability, operation through 
repeaters is made possible. 3. The onfy 
connections made to your base 
transceiver are to microphone and 
speaker jacks. NO INTERNAL 
CONNECTIONS OR MODIFICATIONS 
NECESSARY! Use Private Patch simplex 
for local operation, through a repeater 
for extended range, CW ID makes your 
Autopatch legal, and alerts you to 
incoming calls when ring back is turned 
on. Channel monitor logic precludes 
ringback transmission if channel is in 
prior use, Eliminates accidental 
interference. Five digit owner 
programmable access code and 
operator/long distance inhibit switch 
assure security and protect your phone 
bill Positive control Is assured by 
Private Patch logic functions, A fully 
digital timing approach eliminates ail 
Timing adjustments. Three/six minute 
timer shuts down Private Patch if you 
drive out of range. Resettable with reset 
code for additional talk time as 
required. Self contained AC supply. 
Modular phone Jack and modular phone 
cord provided. All electronics contained 
on one high quality glass circuit card. 
Private Patch contains 42 Integrated 
circuits and 16 transistors. Send for 
additional information. Compare our 
features. (State callsign when ordering.) 

Special Factory Direct 
Introductory Price 

1 YEAR WARRANTY 

s 489 

Postage Paid 

PHONE: (213) 540-1053 

AUTOCONNECT 

P.O. BOX 4155 
TORRANCE, CA 90510 

DEALERSHIPS INVITED 




w ~ 




^130 



MFJ 
24 HOUR 

CLOCKS 

Your choice: dual 24 hour LCD 
display, or 24/12 hour with ID 
timer, or 12 inch quartz analog. 




39 



Q5 DUAL ?4 HOUR LCD 

MFJ-104 



Two independant 24 hour LCD displays! Read 
both GMT and iocaf times at a glance 

Six digit main display has seconds readout. 
Four digit auxiliary Switch reverses mam/aux. 

Alarm plays 4 selectable melodies. Alarm 
OU" indicator Snooze button 

Quartz timing. Synchronizable to VWW. 

Flip-top cover serves as stand. 

Night light. Forward /reverse, fast/slow set 
buttons. Lock function prevents mis -setting. 
Display main time only. main/auxiHary or main/ 
alarm time. Includes battery. 4x2x1/2 inches. 




24/1? HOUR JD TIMER ft^O 
MFJ*102 Ofc 

Switchatole 24 hour GMT or 12 hour format. 

ID timer sounds every 9 minutes after reset. 

Switchahla seconds readout. 

Observed timer. Just start clock from zero 
and note time of event up to 24 hours. 

Bright blue 0,6" vacuum fluorescent digits, 

Alarm with snooze function. Synchronizable 
with vWW. Fast/slow set buttons Lock func- 
tion prevents mis -setting. Power out. alarm 
"W indicators, 110 VAC, 60 Hz {50 Hz with 
simple modification), UL approved. 

Black, brushed aluminum top/front. 6x2x3'\ 

24 HOUR QUARTZ 

MFJ* 105 




$ 



49 



95 



True 24 hour quartz 
wall clock has huge 12 
inch diameter face. 
Gives excellent visi- 
bility across computer 
/radio room. 
Fifteen seconds per month accuracy. 
Single "AA H battery provides Over one year 
operation, immunity from power line failure and 
eliminates power cord 

Sweep second hand. Brown hi -impact case. 
Gl ass front- 24 hour military time format. 

Order from MFJ and try it If not delighted, 
return within 30 days for refund (less shipping) 

One year unconditional guarantee. 

Order yours today. Gall toll free 800-647-1800 
Charge VISA, MC Or mail check, money order 
Add $4.00 each for shipping and handling 



CALL TOLL FREE 800-647-1800 



Call 601-323-5869 in Miss., outside continental 
USA. tech/repair info Telex 53-4590 MFJ STKV 

ENTERPRISES, 

INCORPORATED 

Box 494. Mississippi Stale MS 39762 -* A1 



MFJ 



See Li st of Advertisers on page t14 



73 Magazine • January* 1983 129 



■P 




The front stde ot the Met hen y enclosure, next to the speaker case. 



usual options for each tone} With one* 
board, you can even use sequential single 
tones with a delay In this case, a single 
pot would establish the delay SO that, if) 
effect the device will require that you in- 
put both tones within two seconds, or 
ihree, or whatever period you program Us 
mg. multiple boards, you could do the 
same thing, bul with variable delays be- 



tween selected digits lo safeguard your 
auto pa leh Irorn the guy who breaks your 
code (he s not 1 1 kei y to cat ch on to Ihe vari» 
able delay ideaj And if you use the Meth- 
eny enclosure, it is easy to add a battery 
pack, hang it on your bell, and have an in 
ex pensive tone-accessed HT Of you 
could Forego the speaker and packaQ* : 
in an even smaller enclosure. 




The decoder itself Note that white it does not leave a tot of wasted space on the board, 
there ts sufficient room to wort comfortably. 



II is really nice to see a little outfit like 
Metheny offer a really useful and inexpen- 
sive device like inis. if only we had mote 
such little companies in ham radio 

The UM2Kft jl have no idea what those 
letteis mean) is sold tor £15. OQ plus ship- 
ping The "Storm AJert r " enclosure is avail 



able for S5.00 plus shipping and includes 
speaker and patch cable For more infor- 
mation contact the Meifteny Corporation, 
204 Sunns* Or . Matft$on IN 47250 Res 
Service number 478. 

David Boyd K9MX 
Fort Sheridan il 




RTTY LOOP 



Marc i Leavey, M.Q WA3AJR 
4006 Winiee Road 
Randattstown MD 21133 

Happy New Year 1 I do hope the winter is 
going well for all of the readership, with 
projects underway and the like. One such 
projeel we have been dealing with in this 
column has been the design ot a computer- 
based RTTY terminal This monlh. another 
installment: character input and control 
mechanisms, 

ft should be obvious thai in any complex 
system there is a need for suitable control 
mechanisms, Now. while we are not talking 
about Three-Mile Island here, with a com- 
puter based RTTY terminal I here is a need 
to direct the data flow, fill or empty buffers. 
change speed, etc. if Ihe terminal being 
designed operated only on Murray, the job 
would be relatively easy. The ASCII charac- 
ter set, which most computers use. sup- 
ports many more characters man could 
ever be sent on Murray. It would be easy, 
therefore, to use any or all of those codes, 
such as control codes, special punctua- 
tion, or even lower case r to implement 
some ol these special functions In fact, an 
earlier terminal I designed did (use thai 

However, when designing a terminal 
which will be able to operate on any of the 
several modes, including Murray. ASCII, or 
even Morse, using these extra or control 
characters becomes difficult, it not impos 
siblD A glance at some ol the specialized 
RTTY terminals on the market reveals the 
presence of several function switches on 
the keyboard. These 1 unci ion switches do 
not send out one ASCII character, but a se- 
quence ot characters which can command 
a task to be carried out. 

Such a sequence of codes is normally 
preceded by the ASCII "ESCAPE - char- 
acter, Normally abbreviated ESC. this 
character Is 27 In decimaJ. $TB In hex, or 



OODi 101 1 in binary. As defined in (he ASCII 
standards the ESC character is used lo 
shift into another character set or code 
grouping We can use It, as many terminals 
do, to indicate to the program that the char- 
acters) which I o Hows is not to be sent, but 
to be treated as a special command. 

Once such a protocol is adopted, an es- 
sentially infinite number of command se- 
quences become possible For example, 
ESC-F might be used to fill a buffer and 
ESC-S to send it Numbers appended lo the 
command could denote one of a series of 
butlers, such as ESC-F 7 lo fill butter num- 
ber seven As we have been looking at the 
design of an "Ideal" RTTY terminal, such a 
technique would appear to fill the bill nicely. 

I mp le men t i rig this scheme is not as n . 1 1 . : 
as it might sound. Fig l is a flowchart ot 
the way a character, once received from the 
keyboard mignt be screened for a com- 
mand sequence. By use of a flag, input 
which follows an ESC character can be di- 
verted to initiate the appropriate command 
sequence I will add here r for the smarties 
among you who are worried that you won'l 
be able to send an ESC out over the air even 
if the distant station requires it because it 
would be 1 rapped in this sequence, thai the 
command ESC ESC is normally configured 
to send the ESC code out Does that make 
you Happy? 

Combining ihis command input routine 
with the receive and screen display rou- 
tines presented m previous months begins 
to suggest jusl what this terminal will be 
able to do. Additional modules will be 
presented in Ihe months to come, don't 
worry 

I have a panic note here from Roy E. Den- 
ney N5DGX of Rosweli. New Mexico Roy 
bought a "Transcillator, " Mod ZUH II, at a 
hamfesl. and despite being I old that it was 
in fine working order, it Isn't. Now, I don't 
know what this beast Is, and Roy notes that 



the manufacturer, Prossen Industries of 
West minister. California, is apparently out 
of business. I presume it has something to 
do wilh RTTV, and so does Roy, and we 
boih address the readers of this column to 
scrounge around and see if something 
can't be turned up, It so, send It to me and I 
will see mat Roy gets it. 

Thanks to Winston Yancey WA4TFB who 
relates thai RTTY Loop is the first thing he 
looks tor in 73 He notes being upset it we 
miss a month and wonders why that hap- 
pens For those of you not fully acquainted 
with the schedule a magazine such as 73 
must follow, there is a two- to three-month 
delay between when I wrfte e column and 
when you read il Since I try to delay until 
jusl before deadline lo keep the material as 
topical as possible, it becomes very sen- 
sitive to unscheduled delays, such as de- 
mands from my wont (l am a physician in 
active practice here in the Baltimore area] 
or family, Hopefully, that's not too often, 
bul it will occasionally happen. 

Winston also relates trying to interface 
his Teaas Instruments Tr-99/4 computer for 
RTTY. Apparently tittle in this vein is avail 
able through the users group I must say 
that I have noticed TMXV4s being widely 
marketed, tram computer stores to d<S- 
COunl outlets to toy Stores. I'm sure some- 
body out there is writing software thai 
would be useful lo the RTTYer, it only we 
can find It, Hopefully we can collect some 
here and display if lor ali to see In a future 
column. Are you listening. Tiers? 



Enrt« 
--ipacteh 



SfiT 

ESCAPE 
Ft At 



*ES 



WJ4E 

c*«±ir 4 




*Ei 



CLE AH 
^H ESCAPf 



( 



JUMP 
TO 

APPRGPHIATt 
COM* AUG 

r ,- _ 



/ 



«0CESS 

Ct*AFr£t*E<t 



Greetings to Kevin A. Muench, PtvO , a 
RTTY buff working in the Philippines He is 
attempting to interface a Flesner TU-170 lo 
a Teletype* tvtodel 33 and is looking for 
help I am afraid thai the TU-170 is another 
place of equipment \ have very little Inlor^ 
■nation about, but It is widely used and I am 
sure someone out there has already accom 
pushed such a mating. If so, let me Know so 
that I can send the details along to Kevin. I 
am sending Kevin some other material on 
ihe 6800 programs detailed here in the past 
I am sure that with hts 6800*6809 system, 
Kevin wilt be interested in following the cur 
rent 'super-terminar series as il develops 

From one end of the world to another. I 
have a Letter here Irorn John M. Clarke 
VOt EE, Newfoundland, who is having prob- 
lems of a different sort John has been 
wording on the LNW-fiO computer and. after 
budding trie board s, apparently has trouble 
getting the thing to work right He % unable 
to obtain a good display and thinks that me 
onboard regulators are running too warm 

Well. John, I will offer two words o I ad- 
vice. First of all, regulators usually run 
warmer than you think they should, but 
rarely are they hot It they are too warm to 
touch comfortably, something may well be 
drawing too much Current Which brings 
me to my second tut of wisdom. 

Projects whrch come on printed circuit 
boards, especially widely marketed and 
comple* ones like computers, are usually 
well designed if they come from reputable 
manufacturers. In the case of the LNvV-80, 



Fig. t ESCAPE code processor flowchart. 



130 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



THE AUTEK "QRM ELIMINATOR 



Jl 




115 VAC supply bum Auxiliary Notch re- Four main fitter 

In Filter bypassed ject»80to 11,000 Hi! modfls iof any QRM 

wh*n off. Com *ignil* other situation. 

notches can't touch. 



Model QF-1A 
For SSB & CW 
$69.00 (+») 



Continuously vert- Continuously vari- 
able main selectivity able main frequency, 
{to an Incredible 20 C250 to 2500 Hz) 

Hzn 



AUTEK pioneered the ACTIVE AUDIO FILTER back m 
1972 Today, we're still Ihe engineering Feeder. Our new QF 
1A is the fates! exampFe. Its INFINITELY VARIABLE You 
vary selectivity 100:1 and frequency over the entire usable 
audio range This leis you rejeel whlslles with dual notches 
jto 70 dB}, or reject SS8 hiss end speller with a fully ad 
justabie lowpass plus aux notch Imagine wriat the NAR- 
LOWEST CW FILTEfl MADE will due to QRM' HP re^etts 
Jow frequencies Shirts exceed 90 dB. t watt speaker amp. 



8uJit-in 115 VAC supply. 6Vt*S*2Vj- Two-tone grey Slyimg 
Even latest rigs include only a Traction of the QF-1A 
selectivity Yet it hooks up in minutes lo ANY ng -Yaesu. 
Kenwood, Drake, Swan. Alias, Tempo, Healh, Collins. Ten- 
Tec elc. J us J plug it into yourphone jack and conned spkr 
or phones to the output. Join ihe thousands ol owners who 
now hear stations they couldn't copy wiihoui a OF tA< It 
really works' 



WORLDS RECORD KEYER. OVER 4000 DX QSO'S IN 2 DAYS! 

Probably' the most popular "professional" contest keyer 
In use, yet most owners are casual CW operators or nov- 
ices- After a few minutes, you'll see how memory revolu- 
tionizes your CW operation? Just start sending and record 
your CO, name, QTH h etc, in seconds. 1024 bits stores 
about 100 characters (letters, numbers). Playback ai any 
speed. DoVdash memories, triggered clock, repeat, com- 
bine, 5 to 50+ WPM, buiIMn monitor and 1 15 VAC supply 
Worfcs with any paddte Sil back and relax while your MK-1 
calls CO and handles standard exchanges! 

Optional memory expander (ME 1j expands any MK-1 to 
400 characters. ME t factory installed S35. Owner in- 
stalled, onty S2t \ + S4) Add more memory now or later! 




$100.50 < + $4) 



Modal MK-1 Keyer 



c4utek iZeteazck 

BOX 302 DEPT. S 
ODESSA, FLORIDA 31556* (81 3) 920-434$ 



NO LONG DELAYS, WE SHIP 95% OF 
ORDERS FROM STOCK 

We sell only factory direct. No dealer markup in our price. 
Order with check, M.O., VISA, MC. Add $4 postage and han- 
dling in 43 states. ($7 tor UPS air). Add $?" to Canada, Hi,, 
Ak. Add $25 elsewhere (shipped air). Add 5% tax in Fla. 



LEARNING THE 
MORSE CODE? 

Try the All New 

AEA BT-1 — 

Basic Trainer For 

Morse Code 






AEA, in conjunction with ETS (Educational Technology and Services)*, has 
developed the BT-1 Code Trainer ETS methodology, based upon research by a 
prominent mid west university, has demonstrated that a typical student using this 
system and the BT-1 can learn Morse code to speeds of 20 WPM in four weeks 
based upon two 20 minute daily training sessions. 

The pre-programmed BT-i computerized trainer will allow you to acheive prof i- 
ciency in Morse code faster than any other known method. 

No prior knowledge of Morse code is required to use the BT-1. There are no 
tapes to purchase or wear out. The ETM operates from a 12 VDC source or from 
the AEA 117 Vac wad adapter unit, AC-2. For portable use the 8T-1P is available 
with Nicad batteries and comes with a charger that operates from 117 Vac. The 
unit can also be used in mobile settings via the 12 VDC system. 

"Education Technology & Services, see page 01 October i98i issue of Haiti Red to Magazine 



Prices and Specifications 
Subject To Change Without 
Notice Or Obligation* 

JUQH 

Brings you the 
Breakthrough! 



See the BT-1 at your dealers or write: 
Advanced Electronic Applications, Inc. 

P.O. Box C2160 

Lynn wood, Washington 98036 

(206) 775-7373 Telex: 152571 AEA INTL 



Hear 
Police/ Fire 

Weather 

on 2 Meter Handhelds with 
this MFJ VHF Converter. 



* 

i 




ita 




MFJ VHF 
CONVERTER 

# 



ffE 



■wOOEt WF.t-jf3 



Scanning 
Handhelds 

become 
Potice/Fire 

Scanners 



MFJ 313 



U *39 95 



New MFJ VHF converter turns your synthe- 
sized scanning 2 meter handheld into a not 
Police/Fire/Weather band scanner 

144-148 MHz handhelds receive Police/Fire 
on 154-158 MHz with direct frequency readout 
Hear NQAA weather; maritime coastal plus 
more on 160-164 MHz. 

Mounts between handheld and rubber ducky. 

Feedthru allows simultaneous scanning of 
both 2 meters and Police/Fire bands No mis- 
sed calls. 

Highpass input filter and 2.5 GHz transistor 
gives excellent uniform sensitivity over both 
bands Crystal control ted. 

Bypass/OFF switch allows transmitting. 
Wont burn out if you transmit (up to 5 watts) 
with converter on, Low insertion SWR. Uses 
AAA battery. 2V*xV/mV/j in. BNC connectors. 

Enjoy scanning, memory, digital readout, etc. 
as provided by your handheld on Pol ice/ Fire 
band 

220 MHz Converter for 2 M Handhold 



«MFJ-314 MFJ-314, like MFJ-313 

• ■*QG but lets you receive 221 

3 3 225 MHz on your 2 meter 

w handheld 

Police/Fire/Weather Band Con- 
voder for 2 Meter Mobile Rigs. 



MFJ-312 




MFJ-312, like MFJ-313 but for mobile 2 
meter rigs. Transmit up to 40 watts thru con- 
verter without damage. SO-239 connectors 
Mobile mounting brackets. Rugged. "ON 1 
L ED. Use 12 VDC or AAA battery 3x4x1 in. 

Order from MFJ and fry it- no obligation. If 
not delighted, return it within 30 days for 
refund {less shipping). On_e y ear unconditiona l 
guarantee. 

Order today. Call toll free 800-64M800. 
Charge VISA, MC or mail check, money order 
foe amount indicated plus £4 00 each shipping. 

Hear police/fi re/weather Order now. ^4? 



CALL TOLL FREE ... 800-647-1800 



Call 601-323-5869 in Miss. outside continental 
USA, tech/order/repair info Telex 53^590. 

UC I ENTERPRISES, 

IVirW INCORPORATED 

Box 494, Mississippi State, MS 39762 



** See Ustot Advertisers on page * J 4 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 131 



ihis is a widely marketed piece of equip- 
ment which has received good reviews Prob- 
lems such as you describe can be 1 raced 
to anything from an integrated circuit in- 
stalled backwards (that ts. 1 BO degrees out 
ot phase— don't tell me it can't happen, I've 
done it!) to a solder bridge between two 
printed circuit iractngs (ditto!) The critical 
thing about this is thai if something "hap- 
pened." the res u II may be remedied easily 
by reversing the Integrated circuit or clear- 
ing the bridged conductors, But circuit 
damage could be temporary of permanent. 
U the former, line, but if the latter, you are in 
for a lot of headaches unless you really 
know your way around a circuit. 

The moral of ihis story, tf there is one, is 
to check all the work out very car&fufly for 
integrated'Circuil placement, solder 



bridges, unsoldered pins, or misplaced 
plugs before you apply power, it something 
ts not working right after power is applied, 
5 fop r*gnr fhe*e' Cut the power to the circuit 
and check again, if you find an error and 
correct H and the unit still does not function 
or it you are unable to locale any mistakes 
at all seek expert guidance This may be a 
friend who has a similar device or I he exper- 
tise and equipment to I roubles hoot com- 
plex digital electronics. If all else Tails, write 
a clear description of your problem to the 
manufacturer, Including the model and 
serial number of your unit. Alter all, 
changes in printed circuits or designs may 
make an early product ion run and a late one 
Two different animals, and in order to help 
you, the manufacturer needs to know w~ 
you have, what the problem is, and any 



information such as measurements or the 
like which will aid in diagnosis Do not just 
bundle up the unit and ship it back without 
the manufacturer's consent unless their 
book fells you thai you can Doing so will 
only prompt the string of letters that should 
have preceded and may have prevented the 
shipment. 

While we are up north, regards to another 
newcomer, Irvln F Ha worth VE7CVL from 
Weal Vancouver, B>C, Irv has a rather com* 
plete Apple It setup which he wants to try 
on RTTY, and he wonders how to proceed. 
Well, by now I hope Irv has read last 
month's column with Its rait of sources tor 
Apple land other computer) interfaces You 
might ask around in your area to get a feel 
tor what others are ustng. then visit their 



shack to see how the various units operate. 
Let me hear from you when you get on the 
air. OK? 

My Atari 400 is coming atong for those of 
you who hate asked, although it's not yet 
on-line" I will be looking into various inter- 
faces and the like in the coming months 
and will pass along any lips on what I lino I 
have also been looking into buying eight- 
inch disk drives and have been having a 
rather Interesting lime with a dealer No de- 
tails right now, Just a caveat to be sure that 
what you order by mail Is realty in slock and 
shipped. It appears that the back-order i$ a 
way of life for some mail-order houses. I will 
pass along more information if the situa- 
tion warrants if Stay tuned to this maga- 
zine and don't miss next month's RTTY 
Loop! 



FUN! 



John Edwards Kt2U 
78-56 86th Street 
Qlendale NY 11305 



25) What a jammer usually gets on his 

face 
2B) Former ARRL president (2 words) 

Down 
1} Not ordinary 

2) Popular 1982 ham accessory 

3) New ARRL General Manager 

4) Above VHF iabbr i 

5) Potential no-code license class 



B) Earthquake, fire, etc 

7) ARRL listener (abbr) 
11) Standby 
14) Peru prefix 
16) In the airmobile (abbr.) 
19) Man who signed new communical Ions 

bill 
21 1 Avarice 
25l Listening organ 
27) Summer contest (abbr.) 



THE YEAR IN REVIEW — 1982 

Like most years. 19R2 was a year ol turmoil. In ham radio and the rest of the world 
change was In ih« wmo. Proposed massive FCC rule changes and the advent ol micro- 
computers were Just two areas I hat may mark 1962 as the year ham radio embarked on 
a new era. 

This months FUN? lakes its annual look at the year just gone. How much can 
you remember? 

ELEMENT 1— CROSSWORD PUZZLE 
(Illustration 1) 



Across 
1) Craft announced last year as a 1963 

expedition site 12 words) 
7) CW salulalion i abbr J 
fi.i Critical sunspoi point {abbr j 
9} Prompl or pool stick 

10) Harvesi 

11) Pacific prefix 

12) Problem 



13) Satellite TV (abbr j 
15) Lea si -crowded DX lime 
17) Prosign 

19) Half a headset 

20) Slang for FCC rule 

22) Interlerence (abbr.) 

23) Whatever number 

24) Your residence 



ELEMENT 2 - MULTIPLE CHOICE 

11 The year 1932 witnessed one of the greatest turnovers If) ARRL upper-level personnel 
in quite some time By now, we all know Ihal Vtc Clark is the League's new presidenl 
and Dave Sumner the new General Manager. What, However, was Ihe fate ol Richard 
Baldwin, the old General Manager? 

1) The Job ol ARRL International Affairs Vice President 

2) The Job of ARRL Secretary 

3) The job of ARRL TVl Task Foice Chairman 

4) No fob 

2) Whai was last year's big news from the Heath Company? 

1) Heath s withdrawal from the amateur radio marketplace 

2) The introduclton of Heath's first non-kit amateur transceiver 

3) The introduction of Heaths first solar-powered radio 

4) None of the above 

3| Last year's amendment to the Communications Act of 1934 will permit the FCC to per- 
form which of the following actions: 

1) Complete elimination of all code requiremenis 

2) The addition of a new satellite band 

3) The delegation of amateur testing to local radio clubs 

4) Last year's amendment gave the FCC no new powers 



1 I I |4 I 16 

^^J ^^^J ^^^J ft_J ^— ^J 1- 

^^"1 ^1 r^ I? 




ttfuStratiofi T. 



illustration 2, 



132 73 Magazine * January, 1983 





1 >[/SJsL- hmcshaocI 


w- m \\jft w^. 




1 f ^~s \ 80§N 


Miin 


I |fl fry jf Evantvlllt. 


IN 47711 


1 fn^^^^W 


^449 


AEA 




MBA RO Reactor 


S269 0O 


MBA-flCRcwCodeCofiv Xml 


39500 


MM2MotseMaT»c U'ltmaTe Kftyer 


15000 


CK-2 Conies l Memory Key«* 


12500 


KT 2 KeyerfTraine* 


9900 


BT-1 Trame* 


72 00 


Knp-nlp 144J32G MH/ 


40 00 


ARftL 




6J Handbook 


11200 


Anrenna Book 
License Manga) 


a. oo 


, , 4.00 


Large Assortment ot Publications 


call 


ASTflON 




RS7A 5-7 Amp Power Supply 


$49 00 


RS12A 9- 12 Amp Power Supply 


59 00 


RS20A 16-20 Amp Pgwei Supply 


69 00 


R520M 16-20 Amp* 'me fr 


109 00 


RS35A 25-35 Amp 


135.00 


R535M 25-35 Amp* -met &i 


M9 00 


RS50A 37-50 Amp 


199 00 


R 5 50M 37 -50 Amp •rAnetar 


225 00 


AZDEtt 




PCS 4000 2M Xc" 


cat! 


PCS 300 Handheld 


I2B5 00 


Most Accessories in SIol- 




BASH 




Cod* Tapes/Btudy Guides 


$9.95 


BENCHER 




8Y t Paddle 


$36 00 


BY-Z Ororoe Paddle 


4500 


CALLB00K 




US 


$19 95 


OK 


IB 95 


Map Library 


450 


DA1WA 




CNA T001 5KW Antenna Tuner 


129*40 


CN 520 1 1-60 MH/ SWR/P*t Mif 


63 00 


CN-6200 1 fi-150MHjSWR^P*P Mir 


no oo 


DENTRQN call lor prices 


DRAKE 




TR7A Xcvr 


IT. A 39 .00 


R7A Receiver 


1,399 00 


TR5 Xcvt 


695 00 


RV75 VFO 


269 00 


ENCOMM fSAJfTECl 




ST-iea 


S2SS00 


ST-44C 


30900 


Ssse Cnargvr 


29 35 


HAL DAY 




Saturday January 22nd very special pncmg 




CaJHrjf d*UitJ 


II 


ICOM 




R70 Gen era f Coverage Receiver 


.call 


?20A Gflneral Coverage %&** 


$1,140.00 


nOXevr 


, 669.00 


740 Kcvr 


call 


2&iA 2 Meier AJI Mode 


57500 

■ 


5056 Meter xcvf 


395 00 


25* ?Melei 


299 00 


290H 2 Meier All Mode 


475 00 


35A 220 MHj Mobile 


can 


4SAa*0MH,-Mooiie 


cat) 


2AT 3AT4AT HandneUls 


p&m 


KANTRONICS 




interlace 


$T65 00 


Mim Reader PkQ 


225 00 


Mini Terminal 


249.00 


MFJ 




■jUtG Tuner 


181 00 


496 Super Keyboard 


2^9.00 


313 VHFConv (Of 2 M HTs 


35 00 


104Ne*?4N Dual ClOCh 


36.00 


Large Assortment 


call 


MIRAGE 




B1016 


$239 00 


B3016 


20500 


MPi;MP2 Wait Meters 


too 00 


ROBOT 




400 SSTV Converter 


call 


BOO A SCn, Baudot >CW Terminal 


call 


SHURE 




444D Desk Mic 


$50 00 


4I4A Hanfl Mic 


Tfi 00 


TEN-TEC 


II 


New Transceiver Can abouf Iftit one 1 




TOKYO HY POWER 




H132V 25W Amp 


$75 00 


HLB2V BOW Amp 


155.00 


HL160V 160W Amp 


285.00 


HL20U 440 M Ht Amp 


105.00 


MClSQTune* 


90.00 


HC2000Tunef 


295 00 


VOCOM 




1 AmphfiersiAnts 


call 


Prices and Mritlmbtitty suO/act to change. 




I ^fi^ 812-422-0231 




1 1 ^MON-FIU MM-6ni • SAT 9AM-3PM I 


t^^ Send SASE lor our new & used equipment llal.SBH 




til 



M F J / Bencher Keyer Com 

Deluxe MFJ Keyer fits on Bencher Paddle. Curtis 8044 
IC. Iambic. Adjustable weight, tone, volume, speed. 
Semi and automatic modes. Solid state keying. RF proof. 



mm A *' 



t ft It \ 
rL 1 t 



*rj* 




MFJ-422 

Combo 



$ 



99 



95 



MFJ-422X 
Keyer only 



69 



Trie best of all CW worlds - a deluxe MFJ Keyer 
in a compact configuration that fits right on the 
Bencher iambic paddle' You can buy the combina- 
tion or just the keyer for yotir Bencher, 

Now MFJ Keyer— small in size, big in features. 
Curtis 8044 IC, adjustable weight and tone, 
front panel volume and speed controls (8-50 wpm). 
BuJIt-ln dot-dash memories. Speaker, sidelone, and 
push button selection of semi-automatic/tune or 
automatic modes. 

Ultra-reliable solid state keying: grid-bfodc, 
cathode and solid state transmitters (-300 V. 10 mA 
max.. +300 V. 100 mA max,). Fully shielded. 
Uses 9 V battery or 110 VAC with optional adapter 
MFJ mi, 59-95 

Beautiful functional engineering. The keyer 
mounts on the paddle base to form a small 
(4 t/8 x 2 5/8 x 5 T/2"} attractive combination 
that is a pleasure to look at and use. ^ai 



The Bencher Paddle is a best seller. Fully ad- 
justable gold-plated silver contacts, luttte paddles, 
chrome plated brass, heavy steel base with 
non-skid feet. 

Order from MFJ and try it -no obligation, if 
not delighted, return it within 30 days for refund 
(fess shipping). O ne y ear unccmdii il gua rantee , 

Order today. Call toll tree S00-t5-1/- 180(3. Charge 
VISA. MC or mail check, money order tor amount 
indicated plus S4.00 each shipping and handling. 

Enjoy CW See dealer or tall MFJ now 



CALL TOLL FREE . . . 800-647-1800 



Call 601-323-5869 tn Miss., outside continental 
USA or tor technical into., order/repair status. 



MFJ 



ENTERPRISES, 

INCORPORATED 



Box 494, Mississippi Stale, MS 39762 



We J**f 




%&&* 



t 9 * nod 

Ken* * 



nn» Sp 



It* 






%€& 



AEA 
Ajiie 

Ipjift 



A' 



CvS< 



QJfi**' 



Cod 8 






rviF) 
gen) 



l Cl° cl * 



^m^ 







tef 5 



nfier* 



«— •vSS^* 1 ' 1 «• 



■^Uf- inn 



^81 



453 



rjOi* 



Hoi 



1063 



rr-.T* 

(703) 



-s 1" •■* 






youi 



swt 



& 



Nia 



rit^ e 



Co 



m 10 



up 1 



icat 1 



iops 



pe 



ale 1 



<#5* - 



O 



RpE R 



fOtl 1 



1 



.800 



viH 






jrt 






.336 



-4799 






oftiy* 



ia^P 



(^"STU 



md cn^? 



4P m 






pfice s 






act 1 






*tf»5> 



tf» 



See L/sf o^ Aflvej-f^^/s on page i *"4 



73 Magazine * January. 1983 133 





illustration lA 



Illustration 2A. 



4) Which of the following countries reacned a third party agreement with the US during 
1982: 

l J Spain 

2) Austria 

3) Sweden 
4} Australia 

5) What did tfie FCC plan to do to our phone bands in 1982? 

1} Expand them 
2) Contract them 
3| Eliminate them 

4) Leave them alone 

ELEMENT 3-CRYPTIC PUZZLE 

fly usmg a standard substitution code, decipher this message YMUDVCEQ YSWJV 
QHCK OCO KFH MO M JMZKW SWKUDVJ DMOC LVMW 

ELEMENT 4— MAZE 
(I! lustration 2) 

Did 1982 leave you confused Join the club. This maze certainly won't make you any 
less dizzy, but at least it tajVt very difficult 



THE ANSWERS 






CORRECTIONS 



Element 1; 

See Illustration 1A. 



Element 2: 

1—1 The man's too young for retirement. 

2—2 The SS-9000 computer- controllable rig. 

3 — 3 Soon, perhaps, no more trips to the Federal Building, 

4—4 Down Under was the place, 

5 — 1 Much to the Irritation of most loreign hams. 

Element 3: 

Coded as follows— 

ABCDEFGH I JKLMNOPQHS 
MUYBVPAHQZ J DJHKSRWO 



T 
C 



U 
hi 



V W X 
EFT 



Y 
L 



Z 
G 



CABLE TVI CAME INTO ITS OWN AS A MAJOR PROBLEM LAST YEAR" 
Eiement 4 
See I Must ration 2 A. 

SCORING 

Element 1 

Twenty-five points for the completed puzzle, o* one-haff point for each question correcHy 

answered. 

Element Z: 

Five polnls for each correct answer. 

Element 3 

Twenty-five points for the completed puzzle, 

Element 4 

Twenty-five points for the completed puzzle. 



in the Automatic Beam Aimer/ which 
appeared In the November issue, there was 
an error in I he schematic on i> 23 The di 
odes across K r K2, and K3 were drawn m 
Ihe opposite direction from what they 
should be in the parts list on the same 
page. Radio Shack pan number 27 M7i5 
fers to a 25k poi. Actually, pari 271 171 5 is a 
tOk pot. but it will work equally as well in 
the circuit 

Avery Jenkins WBtiJLG 
73 Staff 

Our apologies to Si even Katz W82WIK, 
author ol "Build Yourself A Paralyzed 
Beam" (December). Readers might better 
view the photo of Ihe relay box on page 24 
by turning the page upside down. 

Awry Jenkins WB8JLG 
73StJlf 

Several errors crept Into the "'Circuits" 
feature In recent months, In the September, 



19B2, issue on p. 92 n there were Iwo errors. 
The first occurred In the description of the 
"Visual Adjust for Gamma Match, with the 
sentence beginning. 'Even if you use an 
swr meter at the transmitter end of the 
scale. ..." It should read, "Even it you use 
an swi meter at the transmitter end of the 
cable, . ,"' And in the description of the 
"Electronic Phone Bell ."' "heat-sink tubing" 
should be heat-shrink tubing. 

On p. 103 of November's issue, (here 
were two errors in "Substitute It a nsformer 
for Heath Gear" Circuit author Terry Martin 
points out that the circuit is a voltage trip- 
ler, no I a voltage dou bier as stated in the 
text He also adds that it supplies 950 V, not 
450 V. 

On p. 1 12 ol the same issue, m "Modifica- 
tion to the Kenwood TS-520S for AFSK/' 
Fig. 3 was incorrectly labeled. Fig, 3 shows 
the H filters of the 530S, not the 5205 as im- 
plied by the text 

Avory Jenkins WBBJLG 
73 Stafi 



How well did you remember B2? 

1 20 points— Skipped the year 
21-40 points— Not very weM 
41-60 points— Bits and pieces 
61-8G points— Very well 
81-100+ points— Totai recall, proceed to 33 

FUNl MAILBOX 

I just gol to the J une issue ol 73 and began your logic puzzles. Element 3. DX X Couples 
fcs incorrect by your solution as Diane has 206 You say Diane is Stan's wife but thai 
Franks wife has more couniiies than Stan's w*fe Therefore, Stan's wife cannot have Ihe 
highest total. It was given that Diane had 206 The correct solution is 

Stan 198, Wilma 202- 7 oral 400 

Frank 194 P Diane 206— Total 4D0 

Joe 196, Susan 200 -To la I 396 

Stan has 198 

Joe has 196 

Bob Gingraa WB4JMH 
Cocoa Beach FL 

Very good, Bob Don't you like trie wnylmess up answers just to keep my readers on their 
toes?— J E 



134 73 Magazine * January, 1983 















10 

11 



NEVER SAY DIE — If you want controversy, 
Wayne Green W2NSD/1 will give it to you. His 
popular column ranges from travelogue to tirade 
and is guaranteed to entertain, inspire and 
enlighten you, 

DX— This globe-trotting tolumn keeps you in- 
formed about the news of the DX world from King- 
man Reef to Bahrain. 

CONTESTS — You get all the news on the contest 
world from Robert Baker WB2GFE. He'll give you 
information on upcoming events and results from 
recent contests. 

FUN — fust for fun, )ohn Edwards KI2U provides 
you with wacky puzzles, quizzes, and games that 
test your ham mettle, 

FCC — If you're looking to the future, these out- 
takes from the Federal Register chronicle changes 

in policy and regulations that relate to amateur 
radio. 

RTTY LOOP — To keep you abreast of radiotele- 
type developments, Marc Leavey WA3AJR ex- 
plains the new RTTY equipment, the increasing 
role of computers in RTTY, and other matters of 
interest to digital communications fans. 

REVIEWS — Before you buy, save yourself some 
money check 73's in-depth evaluation of the 
latest gear 

HAM HELP — As a service to you, 73 prints your 
questions in our magazine. This helps you to ob- 
tain hard-to-get parts, schematics, and owner's 
manuals. 

SATELLITES -From Phase EM to TVRO, 73 Maga- 
zine covers the news of the satellite world like no 
other radio amateur magazine 

NEW PRODUCTS — This brief look at the latest 
ham equipment on the market keeps you on top of 
new developments in amateur radio. 

AWARDS — To find out what certificates are avail- 
able where, read Bill Cosney KE7C's coverage of 
all the ham radio awards. 

CONSTRUCTION— The builder's magazine 
that s 73. You get the best projects from the best 
authors every month. 




Send me a dozen issues of 

MAGAZINE 

for the dozen reasons listed! 

□ Check enclosed for 1 year for only $19.97 

Bill: D MC LI VISA D AMEX D ME 

Cardtf Interbank*/ . 




Exp. date 



Name 



Sig 



Address, 
City 



Stall' 



/ip 



< mada & Mexico 52297 t ve*ir L< S funds 

foreign surldLt' 51997 1 veat U S funds drawn on US bank only 

Foreign JunTMil — pksife inquire 



L 



73 Maga*ine*PO Box 931*Farmingdale, NY«11737 

Please a J tow 6-tt weeks for delivery 33 1 R$ 




MAGAZINE 

FOR RADIO AMATEURS 



Subscription Department 
PO Bo* 931 

Farmmgdale, NY 11737 

1-800-258-5473 

For orders only please. 
Foreign air mail, please inquire 





73 Magazine * January, 1983 135 




Daisy wheel quality 
without daisy wheel 

expense* 





You need the quality print that a daisy wheel 
printer provides but the thought of buying one makes your 
wallet wilt, Sefccmc™ Interface^ a step-by-step guide co inter- 
facing an IBM Selectric I/O Writer to your microcomputer, 
will jpve you that quality at a fraction of the price* George 
Young, co-author of Microcomputing magazine's popular 
"Kilobaud Klassroom" series, offers a low-cost alternative 
to buying a daisy wheel printer. 
Seleetrk Interface includes: I 

* stcp-by-step instructions 

* tips on purchasing a used Selectric 

* information on various Selectric models, in- 
cluding the 2740, 2980, and Dura 1041 




♦ driver software for Z8Q, 8080, and 6502 chips 

♦ tips on interfacing techniques 

With Selectric Interface and some background in electronics, 
you can have a high-quality, lownzost, letter-quality 
printer, Petals not included. I | I 

Credit card orders call TOLL-FREE 1^00-258-5473- Or mail your order 
with payment plus 51.50 shipping and handling to: Wayne Green li 
Attn: Retail Book Sales, FWrborough, NH 0345a 
Dealer inquiries invited. 

ISBW0-S8OQ&O5M 







$12.97 



D Yes, I want Selectric lnterfaceiBK7J88). Enclosed is 5 12.9? per 
copy plus SL50 for shipping and handling. 

D MASTER 

Card t 

Signature 



□ VISA 



-AMf.X 



Expires 






Name 









Address] _ 
City 









- 



State and Zip 

All (ttdfft fhipprd UPS if c o mpl et e meet *tkJrr** t* givm. 



SS01 



YOU MISSED IT! ^ 




Techric; ^S^uMum 



Ml MM MO** 



&5S55S3 




Bui you still need that issue of 73 Magazine. 

Well, it's not too late to get it. 

Send for your free Back Issue Catalog, 

A complete listing, including editorial highlights, 

You still need it. 
And we've still got it. 

YES, I want my free Back Issue Catalog for 73 
Magazine. 

Name 

Address . . 

City State Zip 





73 Magazine, Mail Order, SO Fine St, T Peterborough, NH 03458 



MOVING? 

Let us know 8 weeks in advance so that you won't 
miss a single issue of 73 Magazine. 
Attach old label where indicated and print new ad 
dress in space provided. Also include your mailing 
label whenever you write concerning your subscrip- 
tion. It helps us serve you promptly. Write to: 



I 

I 
i 

I 




magazine 



Subscription Department 

P.O, Box 931 

Farmingdate NY 11737 



Extend ms subsc option cine additional year lor only SII.T* 
: Pas men! enclosed Bill me 

Canada and mctito S22 97. US funds. Foreign Surface S19.97, 
US t'unds. drawn nn US hanks 



I 
I 



IT 
3\Name 

^ Address . 

fc City 



If you have nn label h.i ndv print OlO dddn»ss here, 

Call 



i 
i 

i 

i 

I 



State 



Zip 



I 
I 
I 

I 



Name 



print Ni W address, here: 
Call _ 




Address _ 
City 



I 



State. 



Zip 



331 R6M J 



136 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



RADIO 



8012 CONSER BOX 4327 
OVERLAND PARK, KANSAS 66204 



91 3-381- 



BUY-SELL-TRADE 

All Brands New & Reconditioned 





. 



■i 




YOU WANT A DEAL — WE WANT TO DEAL 




SAVE 



CALL NOW!!! 

SAVE 



SAVE 



VISA 



NOTE: SEND $1.00 FOR OUR CURRENT CATALOG OF NEW AND RECONDITIONED EQUIPMENT 
SEND $1.00 FOR OUR WHOLESALE LIST OF UNSERVICED & OVERSTOCK ITEMS. 
SEND $2.00 FOR BOTH. THEY WILL BE MAILED SEPARATELY. 



Take your favorite H.T. out 
for a drive tonight. 



VISA or MASTERCARD for 
same day shipment 



For $69.95 you get the most efficient, 
dependable, fully guaranteed 35W 2 meter 
amp kit for your handy talkie money can buy. 

Now you can save your batteries by operating 
your HT. on low power and still get out like a 
mobile rig. The model 335A produces 35 watts 
out with an input of 3 watts, and 15 watts out with 
only 1 watt in. Compatible with IC-2AT. TR-2400, 
Yaesu. Wilson & Tempo! Other 2 meter models are avail- 
able with outputs of 25W and 75W, in addition to a 100W 
amplifier kit for 43GMHZ, ^^ 

Communication Concepts Inc. ^"-»^ «**«*«» 



NEW 



ELECTRICITY 
FOR 
HAM 
RADIO 



■1411 



OVER 70 BRANDS W LAN0M0WLE J . 
IN STOCK O RADIO 



Full Service Shop •Spectrum Analysts -Antennas 
New and Used Equipment -CW-SSB-FM, Etc. •Towers 
FCC Study Guides •Code Tapes • Books •Accessories 



(COM 



SHORTWAVE 



CLOSED 
SUNDAYS 
HOLIDAYS 



HOURS 

MON TUES WED 
9 30- 6 00 PM 



THURS FHI 
9 3M DO PM 



Specialists in Amateur Radio, 
Short-Wave Listening 
And Contemporary 
Electronic Gear. 



SAT 9 30-3:00 Ptfl 



INC ..; 



-- ■- . 



1009 GARFIELD ST OAK PARK, IL. 60304 



See Ltsl of Advertisers on pagg U4 



(31 2) 848-6777 



ONLY 

$339 

plus $15 shipping 

LET WIND 

POWER YOUR RADIO EQUIPMENT 
Winds! ream charges 6 12 or 24 volt bat- 
ter tea Ideal tor daily radio operation 
emergencies and field days - Easy to 
mount and operate 

QUIET, EFFICIENT AND RELIABLE 

Strong sitka spruce blades drive a 
special TC25G low rpm generator. 
Delivers up to 100 watts 
SAFETY FEATURE - Rotor auto 
matically tilts back in high winds then 
returns to operating positK>n 

New technology tor clean, natural power 
REPLY TODAY FOR FREE INFORMATION 



Thermax 



THERMAX CORPORATION, OEPT. ST2 

One Mill St., BuHmgionYT 05401 

Phone 800-451-3402 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 137 




Chad Harris VP2ML 

Box 4881 

Santa Rosa CA 95402 

NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIONS 

The new year always provides a good 
time to review operating practices and 
perhaps improve techniques on the air, 
Here is my Ust of New Year s DX resolu- 
tions; why don t you come up witti your own 
list and post n next lo your rig! 

1. I wilt not tune up on the air without 
checking the frequency. Instead, 1 wilt usea 
dummy load, mark the controls tor each 
band h or search lor a clear frequency before 
tuning up, 

2. I will listen carefully before I call. No 
more "Who did I |ust work?" or calling out 
of turn when the OX station is working by 
call areas, 

II will keep well informed, so that I don't 
have to ask "What's his OSL address? ' in 
the middle of a DX pileup 

4 I Mill not oe a DX nog " i won t daunt 
my imulii'ikilowaifs m pifeups and then ask 
the rare DX siation to run a tew tests with 
different antennas, etc. 

5. 1 will not be a self-appointed policeman 
on the DX bands, nor will I taJk back lo one, 
The bands are crowded enough without 
this nonsense. 

6, 1 will Keep my transmissions short and 
listen often, to reduce QRM. 

7, I will be courteous at all limes to my 
fellow DXers. no matter what I hey do, 

8. 1 will QSL promptly, with the card care- 
fully filled out 

9L I will check out my itg to ensure that 
my signal is clean and not causing QRM, 

10. 1 will try other bands and modes and 
not sit on 20 SSB 

If we all follow these resolutions we will 
have an easier and more pleasant DX expe- 
rience in 1981 And we'll need every advan- 
tage we can get lor the big pileup s around 
Heard Island early this year. 

HEARD UPDATE 

The race is on to Heard Island. One of the 
most difficult and expensive DXpeditions 
continues its relentiess dnve towards this 
isolated rock (see inis column. September. 
1962), as the members of the VKS DX 
Chasers Dub nan down many of the details 
of the \tip„ 

At the same time that the VK6 DX 
Chasers are organizing their trip to Heard. 
the well-known South Pacific DXer, Jim 
Smith VK9NS, has chartered his own trans- 
portation to Heard. JJm sports an Impres- 
sive record of successful DXpeditions 
throughout the region and is as knowledge- 
able and experienced as any DXpedrhoner. 
Jim aims to arrive at Heard a month before 
the mountaineering group So alter years 
with absolutely no activity, it looks tike 
Heard might be the subject of not one but 
two DXpeditions 

As of press lime, the operators on the 
VK6 DX Chasers DXpedition are slated to 
be: Alan Fisher NBCW, Charles Brady 
M4BQW, and David Shaw VK3DHF. Alan is 
a mechanical engineer, which is likely to be 
a very useful talent on Icy, windswept 
Heard. N49QW is a physician when not DX- 
ing, and one hopes bis spec tally will not be 
needed on this DXpedition. The Australian 
on the DXpedition learn has worked with 
the Australian meteorology department as 
an electronics technician. Both meteorol- 
ogy and elect rqnics will certainly be need- 
ed on Heard island 



The vessel taking the hams and 
mountaineers to Heard Is as Impressive as 
the list of operators. The Atf&GOnda If is 84 J 
long, 20' wide, and spoils a 38' main mast. 
Anaconda it has Antarctic experience, 
having lust completed the Rio De Janeiro 
Race through the 'Roaring Forties" and 
around Cape Horn The yacht comes fully 
equipped with the latest in navigational and 
electronic systems. Including radar, satel- 
lite and terrestnal navigation, depth sound- 
er, and access lo remote computers, {it's 
probably too much to hope that I hey could 
keep the radio log In their computer . .) 
The hams anct mountaineers will use in- 
flatable surf rescue boals lo get to the 
rocky shore of Heard. 

The choice of rigs and antennas for the 
Antarctic DXpedition presents a difficult 
problem Sturdy, dependable, easy-to-re- 
pair radios are the order of the day. Another 
key to dependable operation involves tak- 
ing several of the same radio. Then a 
ma I functioning radio can be cannibalized 
for parts if another fails. 

The antennas and outside gear will take 
an even worse beating than I he radios, The 
combination ot freezing rams and high 
winds can destroy mo si antennas, so spe- 
cially reinforced an I en n as are required ol 
the day* Finding lubricants thai won't 
freeze up lor the antenna's rotors repre- 
sents another necessity 

After the hams collect their equipment 
they must practice its assembly and repair, 
Each antenna and support system must be 
put together and taken apart again and 
again. What toots are needed? Can they be 
handled with gloves and mittens on 7 Exact- 
ly what hardware is needed for each opera- 
tion? How many extra nuts and bolts 
should oe taken? What do they do if piece X 
breaks? The size ol the yacht limits the 
number of spare parts the DXpedition crew 
can take, so which are the most essential? 
These are the kinds of decisions which go 
Into a well-planned DXpedition 

But even more important than the hard- 
ware Is the "software"— the radio skills of 
the amateur operators There are definite 
skills necessary for handling pileupS keep- 
ing the contact rate hj§ h. and gtvtncj every- 
one a fair chance at a contact Weather 
conditions are going to be rough on Heard, 
and radio conditions might not be much 
better. Heard is a long, long way from any 
sizeable collection of amateurs. Thai 
means thai Heard's signals will be relative- 
ly weak, and European, stateside, and 
Japanese signals will also be weak at 
Heard. It will take highly-skilled amateurs 
to keep I he pileups under control. 

We hope that the Heard Island 
DXpedihoners will avoid the kind of poor 
operation shown at the St. Peter and Paul 
Rocks tPVO) this fail. There is simply no ex- 
cuse for spreading out the callers over 100 
kilohertz of the 20-meter phone band. Even 
the Cllpperton island DXpedition used only 
75 k Hz ! There are many ways to spread out 
the callers without disrupting the entire 
20-meter phone band Non-DXers think 
poorly enough of the DX fraternity without 
this kind ol bad manners. Perhaps it's time 
for a standard of DX conduct lor DXpedi- 
tions We'll have more Lo say aboul this in a 
future issue 

Meanwhile, the question of money con- 
tinues. The mountaineering Heard Island 
trip may well cost Si 50,000 or more. Dona- 
tions of equipment, supplies (including 
warm underwear), and cash have started 
the ball rolling. The expedition is taking film 



of the entire trip, to recoup some of their 
costs An artist on Ihe expedition team in- 
tends to sell paintings of the Heard Island 
landscape and penguins 

One major source of expedition funds is 
the amateur community. Both the Northern 
California DX Foundation fPO Box 2368, 
Stanford University CA 94305) and the 
International DX Foundation (PO Box 1t7, 
Manahawkin NJ OSOSO) have pledged 
$10,000 to (he program, And bolh DX 
foundations are looking for new members 
and contributions to assist their work. The 
Australians organising the amateur part ol 
the trip are inviting amateurs and others to 
become associate members of the*" An tare 
tic Adventure, at S3G (Australian) The VK6 
DX Chasers are also selling DXpedition 
T-shirts at $9.50 (Australian! Contact them 
at Bom 10. Perth 6005. Western Australia. 

Meanwhile, Jim Smith commutes to solic- 
it funds and operators for his assault on 
Heard, You can send your contributions lo 
Box 103. Norlolk Island, Australia 

Your contributions will help with the 
Heard Island DXpeditions and future trips 
to other rare spots. 

Who will get to Heard first? Will there be 
anyone left to work for the second DXpedi 
lion? The best way to find out Is to turn on 
your receiver and listen 

MAILING YOUR QSL CARD 

If you do work Heard Island this winter, 
either VKDHI or VKCUS you will want lo get 
a OSL card confirming the contact. In the 
last two months we discussed how to 
design and till out yout QSL This month 
we'll look at ways to gel your card to the 
right place. I'll discuss these methods 
roughly In order from slowest lo fastest. 

The Bureaus 

By far the easiest way to send your QSL 
to another amateur in another country is via 
the OSL bureau system. Every civilized 
country (and some that at& not} has an 
incoming OSL bureau tor ihe benefit of its 
amateurs. Incoming cards are sorted every 
so often and distributed lo local amateurs 

Some of the bureaus are excellent. The 
Japanese and West Germans have espe- 
cially top-notch bureaus, The smaller coun- 
tries have less formal systems; In some 
cases, they are essentially nonexistent, 

Sending your card to a DX station via the 
bureau is simply a matter of wrrting the DX 
station's call in the upper right corner of the 
back of the QSL and sending it to the ad 
dress listed in the IARU informal ion or the 
Caiibook If you have any number of cards 
going to the same country the cost is a few 
cents a card. 

An even easier system for ARRL mem- 
bers is the League's on-going DX OSL 
bureau, A membership label off OST and 
$1.00 per pound of QSLs [about ISO) gels 
the cards off to the DX bureaus for less 
money (and probably taster) than any other 
service. Contact the ARRL for more infor- 
mation 

The chief complaint about the bureau 
method Is speed. There isn't any. Three to 
four months is about as last a turnaround 
as anyone can expect. A year or two is not 
unusual. With Russian QSLs {through the 
famous Box 88, Moscow), delays of 3-5 
years are common and I have seen 
10-1 5-year-old QSLs in packages direct 
from Box 88. Small wonder that it takes 
twenty years to get on the honor roll; it can 
lake that long for a bureau card! 

Commercial QSL Forwarding Services 

There are other outfits which provide the 
same service as the League's outgoing 
OSL bureau, plus the added benefit ot 
searching out QSL managers and faster 
OSL methods. These services advertise in 
most amateur-radio magazines. 

The price per card runs about S0.tCV.20, 



but service depends on The volume of cards 
and the expertise of Ihe amateur running 
the operation. W3KTs service used to be 
the best, before Jesse passed away last 
year (see this column, September. 1962) 

If you want to go this route, contaci the 
operator and lind out the number of cards 
per week he handles, how long the cards sit 
in his hands, how he arranges tor return 
QSLs, and the calls of some hams who 
have used the service. Then follow up on 
this information before depending on the 
QSL forwarding service 

The same problem applies to thts kind of 
service as to the League bureau system: It 
can take a tony time, A well-run forwarding 
service can get cards to stateside OSL 
managers and back quite cheaply and rap- 
idly. But DX OSLs usually go by sea mail 
and can be months in transit. There is an- 
other potential problem with Ihe OSL tor- 
warding services: Their success depends 
heavily on the skills of the manager. His 
knowledge ol DX and OSLing can make the 
difference between cards on the wall and 
wasting your money. 

Direct QSLs 

Since DXers are an impatient lol , the pre- 
ferred method involves sending a QSL of an 
important DX contaci directly to the person 
handling the OSL chores. This person 
might be the actual DX operator himself or 
a QSL manager 

To send the card, you need the correct 
address Obtaining this accurate address is 
one of the fine arts of DXtng. The f irsi place 
you look tor (his information is on the air. 
Listen to I he DX station. Where does he say 
you should send the QSL? The horses 
mouth is by far your best source of QSL 
Information, 

Next best are second-hand sourc 
such as DX nets, repeaters, and bullet ins 
Pulling information out of the bulletins is a 
time-consuming task, and errors abound. 
DX nets are a in lie better, but it helps lo 
know who is providing the in formal ion* to 
help judge its reliability DX repeaters offer 
the chance to taJk to someone who has al- 
ready received a card back Irom that DX 
siation. Whatever method was successful 
once Is worth anolher try. 

If you don' I want to spend your DXing 
time reading every bulletin and monitoring 
every DX net, you might consider subscrib- 
ing to one of the DX QSL lists. Look for their 
ads in the magazines and bulletins W6GO 
and K6HHD publish a QSL Manager Lrst 
with more than 5000 calls, This list is up- 
dated monthly and costs £15 00 per year in 
the US. The address is PO Bo* TOO. Rio Lin 
da CA 95673 

Another possible source of DX address 
information is the Caltbooft. Some ama 
leurs say they are "OK in any Caiibook." 
The Catfbopk also lists QSL bureaus in the 
various DX countries. The Gattbook Is 
avail able at your local radio store or by 
mail. 

Addressing the Envelope 

You have fmally located what you are 
sure is the 'latest word, ' the "up-to-the- 
minute" OSL address You could lust write 
(he address on the back of your card and 
mail it, but you would get an answer via the 
incoming QSL bureau or not at all You 
probably want to send the card in an 
envelope, with a sell -addressed, stamped 
envelope (SASE) enclosed. 

Avoid the temptation of putting more 
than one card In an envelope, Say you 
worked Eric SMGAGD from several of his 
Pacific locations this past fall (see this col- 
umn, August. 1962). Please don't put all the 
cards for SM3CXS (Eric's QSL Manager! in 
to one envelope. Use a separate envelope 
for each QSL card. Or If you really can't af- 
ford to do thai, at least send cards for each 
separate call sign in a separate envelope. 






138 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



FREE! 

Brand New Catalog 



With Over 150 Programs 



Instant Software s new catalog is free and it offers 150 of the finest 
programs you can find. At reasonable prices. , .and a variety 
youVe never seen before in one catalog. And they're all contained in 
the new 16 page 1983 Instant Software catalog. You'll find: 



ASSEM/ZSIM — 2 great utilities in 
one super package. Assembly lan- 
guage programmers, this package 
solves all your programming prob- 
lems from* ASSEM to ZSIM. 

Super Utility Plus — the most 
powerful program of its kind, A 
must for every serious TRS-80* disk 
installation. 

Geography Explorer Series— the ex- 
citing, attention-holding series that 
teaches vour children essential geo 
graphical facts. 

Phaser Blast — phaser- armed 
robots, enemy Hovertanks . . . pre- 
pare for a journey into the war of 
the future. 



Columbia through launch, orbit, 
re-entry and landing. 



Plus dozens of other practical, 
mind-boggling or spine-tingling 
programs. 

And now you can get the new 1983 
Instant Software Catalog absolutely 
free, You don't even have to pay for 
the phone call. Just dial toll free: 



1-800-258-5473 

and ask for your free copy of last ant 
Software's 1983 Catalog, 
It could be the smartest call you'll 
make all year. 




Space Shuttle — experience the ulti- Instant Software* The best software 

mate flight as you pilot America s under the sun. 



Instant Software 

{a subsidiary of Wayne Green Inc.) Route 101 & Elm St. 




Peterborough, NH 03458 



*THS-N(I is ■ registered Inidemurlt of the Radio Stuck division of Tmidy Cora, 









Yes, I want a free catalog! Name 

Please send my free copy to: 

Address 



LnstantSoftware: c%. 

FftlcrborougrL. N.H 03456 USA A tufrtidi*ry ©f W»yn« Cr**n inc. 

The best software under the sun. 



State. 



Zip. 



I have a 



computer 



NC016 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 139 



Mixing 1 he calls or cards will only delay 
ihe response Often, different people in 
different locations handle the cards for 
different calls, even though The QSL ad- 
dress rs the game, as is the case with 
SM3CXS. If you mix several caflsigns. the 
cards and your return envelope will go to 
one QSL manager, bacMoSM3€X$, and so 
on. Anywhere along the line your cards 
might gel lost or separated from the return 
envelope. Make everyone's life easier, and 
speed your return QSL by sending each 
card m a separate outer envelope. 

Should you put the call sign oF me DX sta- 
tion on I he outer envelope*'' An excellent 
question. II the card is oping to an address 
in the States. Western Europe, or Japan, by 
all means do 90, The first cailstgn on the ad- 
dress should be thai of the DX station you 
worked, the second the call of the QSL 
manager VP2ML via KIRK This allows the 
QSL manager to sort the cards quickly 

On the other hand. I recommend /eeving 
off the call sign on ihe envelope If (he card 



15 gotng to an African country. Eastern Eur- 
ope, T urkey , or any other country where am- 
ateur radio is illegal or frowned upon. Trie 
reason is 1 heft or danger to the DX amateur 
CaUsigns on the outer envelope may indi- 
cate money inside, so many of these enve- 
lopes never reach their intended destina- 
tions In the case of Turkey, the DX amateur 
can run afoul of local authorities by receiv- 
ing mail with a callsign on Ihe envelope. 

The beal fule of thumb is, when In doubt. 
leave it off. And if you ever send personal 
mail to an active QSL manager, write in 
large tetters. "Not a QSL" on the envelope? 
Otherwise, it may get thrown in with the 
QSLs to be answered tomorrow/" 

When to Mail 

We are all anxious to get our return QSL 
card . espec 1 ally one con f irmi ng a rare OSO 
So many of us rush right out Ihe day we 
work the DX station and mail oft the card, 
This is fine when the card Is going directly 
to a DX resident in another country. Bui it Is 



not necessari ly t he best 1 1 me to send a QSL 
card for a DXpedittem contact or to a OS L 
manager 

Many DXpedi honors handie their own 
OSUng. If you can still read them on ihera- 
dtp, they can't be home answering your 
QSL. Wail a while In fact, most Expedi- 
tions don't print the QSLs until they get 
nome and know how many they need- It wi II 
Often be a month or more before they even 
have any cards to fill out 

If you really jump the gun and send the 
card out whi le the OXoed it ioner is still away 
from home, you can create some un needed 
friction between the OXer and his local posi 
o*f»ce When I returned from 10 days in the 
Galapagos, there were 6 nags of QSLs wart 
ing tor me. On one day I received more mail 
than the rest of the local residents com 
bined < The post office personnel 1 bought 1 
was running some sort ot mail scheme and 
threatened to charge me a commercial rate 
and storage fees And somewhere, bui 
In that tomeol malt were personal le Iters, 



frits, and checks. It took a solid day just to 
pull my personal mail out of the QSLs 1 

So give the OXet some time to flet home, 
gel some cards printed, and catch his 
breath T before overflowing his PQ Box 

the same problem can happen when QSL 
managers gel their log information via the 
maiL The logs might take weeks or months 
to get to Ihe QSL manager, before he can 
look up the contact and answer your QSL 

Some QSL managers get around I his by 
having regular schedules with the DX sta- 
tion. The manager reads the contact in- 
formation, the Dx station checks his log, 
and the QSO is confirmed. This system 
worked so weft for me at VP2ML that one 
amateur received h*s QSL card less lhan 48 
hours after the contact! 

Enough about how 10 get your QSL card 
to the right place It s the next step that's 
the important one anyway: getting the DX 
stations^ QSL card back! Hang on until 
next month I 



AWARDS 



Bift Gosney KE7C 
Micro-80, inc. 
2665 North Busby Roao* 
Oak Harbor WA 98277 

LABRE AWARD 

The Worked All American Award has 
been instituted by LABRE (Liga de Ama- 
dores Brasileiros de Radio Emissaol to 
promote mteresi m the American area 

The WAA award win be issued 10 any It- 
censed amateur station presenting proof 
of contact with tofly five (45) Of more 
countries in the American area. 

All applications should tie seni to the 
Awards Manager, LABRE. PQ Box 07/ 
0004, Brasilia, Distrita Federal, Brasil, 
CF.P 70.000, 

Confirmations must be accompanied 
by a list of claimed countries to aid in 
checking. A tog verified by the awards 
manager of the applicants country 
league or association will be accepted 
instead of QSL cards. Logs may also 
be verified by two amateurs m ihe appli- 
cant's area. 

All contacts must be made with li- 
censed amateur stations operating in au 
ihorized amateur hands. Contacts must 
be made only with licensed and based am 
ateur stations, Con tads with ships and 
aircraft cannot be counted 

All stations must be contacted from the 
same call areas where such areas exist, or 
from the same couniry in cases where 
there are no call areas. One exception is 
allowed to this rule tf a station moves 
from one calf area to another or from one 
country to another, all contacts must be 
made from within a radius of 150 miles 
from the initial toe alien 

Contacts may be made over any period 
of years since November of 1945, Con- 
tacts may have been made under d liferent 
call letters In the same call area (or coun- 
try) If the license for all was the same. 

Any altered or forged confirmations will 
result in permanent disqualification If ob- 
served by the WAA award advisory com- 
mittee. A minimum readability of 3 ifl3> 
must be recorded for phone and a mini 
mum signal tone Of 5 (S5J must be record- 
ed for CW. 

Al I appi icatio n 5 m us t be forwarded wi 1 h 



ten IRCs or equivalent for handling and 
posiage and return ol QSL cards by regis 
tered airman 

All certificates will be consecutively 
numbered and an honor roll showing all 
those issued wiN be kept by the awards 
manager of LAS RE. 

The following list of countries in ihe 
American area (North and South America) 
is presented as a guide. Deleted countries 
win not be vaJid- 

WAA Countries List 

CE Chile 

CE Easter Island 

CE Juan Fernandez 

ce San Feltn 

CM-CO Cuba 

Cx Uruguay 

fg Guadeloupe 

fm Martinique 

F08 French Polynesia 

FO8X Clipperton (stand 

FP St Pierre & Miquelon Islands 

FS Saint Martin 

FY French Guiana 

HC Equador 

HCS Galapagos island 

hh Haiti 

HI Dominican Republic 

hk Colombia 

HK9 Bajo Nuevo 

HKQ Maipelcs Island 

HKO San Andres & Provldenqla 

HP Panama 

HR Honduras 

J j Grenada 

J6 ST Lucia 

J7 Dominica 

K-W USA 

KC4 Navassa 

KG4 Guantanamo Bay 

KP7 Alaska 

KP4 Puerto Hico 

KP4/D Desecheo Island 

KS4 Swan ts, {now HR) 

KS4 Serrana Bank (now uses HKO) 

KV4 Virgin Islands 

K25 Canal Zone (until March 24 f 1978) 

LU Argentina 

OX Greenland 

PJ Neth Antilles 

PJ Saint Maarten 

OA Peru 

PP, PZ PR, PS, PT\ PU. PW, PY 
Brazil 



Ff$ Fernando Noronha 

PY9 SL Peter's & St Pauf£ 

PVQ "nndade & Manim Vaz Islands 

PYQ Abrolhos island 

PZ Sunnam 

TG Guatemala 

Tl Costa Rica 

TI9 Cocas Island 

VE Canada 

VP1 British Honduras 

VP2A Antigua and Barbuda 

VP2E Angulila 

VP2K St Kills 

VP2M Montserrat 

VP2S St. Vincent 

VP2V Bntish Virgin Islands 

VPS Turks & Caicos Islands 

VP7 Bahama Island (Now C6J 

VPS Antarctica 

VPB/LU Falkland Island 

VP&'LU Georgia island 

VP8/LU So Orkney island 

VP&7LU So, Sandwich Island 

VPS/LU So. Shetland (stand 

VP9 Bermuda 

XE Mexico 

XF4 Rev ilia Glgodo 

YN Nicaragua 

YS El Salvador 

YV Venezuela 

YV Aves Island 

ZF1 Cayman Island 

2P Paraguay 

6Y Jamaica 

8P Barbados 

8R Guyana 

9V Tnmdad & Tobago Islands 

MARTINIQUE AWARD 

The FM DX Group of Martinique Is offer- 
trig a certificate tor OSOs with FM7 and 
FMa stations. Throe hundred points will 
earn the certificate, with scoring as fol 
tows; Contacts with an FM DX Group 
member count 10 points per QSO, FM0 
contacts count 4 points each, and FM7 
contacts count 2 points A phone OSO is 
worth 1 fraint. RTTY or ASCII count *or 2 
points, and a CW contact is worm 3 
points 

One point: is given for a contact on 10, 
15. or 20 meters, a contact on 16C or flO me- 
ters Is worth 2 points, and a QSO on any 
other frequency receives 3 points. One 
polni also is added lor each 3,000 miles 
distance from Martinique. 

A minimum of 7 days Is required be- 
tween two OSOs with the same station, 
and 25 percent of Ihe points must have 
been made in contact with an FM OX 
Group member 

Logs and a $5.00 money order should 
tk« sent to Gerard Souqui FM7BX. PO 



Box 152, 97202 Fori de France Cedei. 
Martinique. 

W, VIRGINIA OSO PARTY 

The West Virginia OSO Party, spon- 
sored by the West Virginia Slate Amateur 
Radio Council, will be from 1700Z January 
22 until 1700Z January 23. Single operator 
only Exchange signal report, serial num- 
ber, county {VW only), state, or country. 
VVV stations multiply total by sum ol WV 
counties, stales, and cou nines worked, 
Others multiply QSO totals by vVV coun 
ties worked Mull I ply score by 1-5 if you run 
200 Watts or less. Suggested frequencies 
Phone— 10 kHz Irom lower edge ol Gener 
at subbands; CW— 35 fcHz from low ends- 
Novice— 35 kHz from low ends. Repealer 
contacts permissible- Mail logs by Febru- 
ary 1 1 10 K 8 B5. 950 Gordon Road, Chartes 
ton WV 25303. 

WISCONSiN SPECIAL EVENT 

The Eao Claire , Wisconsin, ARC wtH op- 
erate K9EC/9 during the National ?(MVtetrjr 
Ski Jumping and Nordic Combtned Cham- 
pionship on January 29 and 30 Irom 1400Z 
to 23O0Z- Frequencies CW— 52 kHi up 
from bottom edge Phone— 3960, 7277. 
14282. 21382. and 28520. For an BVi x 11 
certificate, send SASE to N9A1X PO Box 
201. Aitoona Wi 54720. 

GROUNDHOG DAY 

The PunMSutawney (Pennsylvania) Am 
ateur Radio Club will operate on 14.290 
and 7.230 from 9 am 10 5 pnx January 30, 
1983 + In commemoration ot Groundhog 
Day 1983 We will operate also on 7.230 on 
February 2. 1983 (Groundhog Day). This 
special-event station will operate from 
Gobblers Knob, (he home of the Ground 
hog. Certificate for SASE and QSL card to 
Art Sweeney K3HWJ. RO tl, Box 371, 
Punxsutawney PA 1S767 

GEORGIA'S 250TH BIRTHDAY 

Savannah area amateurs wilt have a 
special -events operation in honor of ihe 
State of Georgia's and historical Savan- 
nah's 250th birthday Operation will be 
February 12 and 13, 15O0-2O0OZ on upper 
25 kHz, all General phone, and 21.130 to 
21 .170 kHz Novice. QSOs on 2 melars 
1*6L52 only For special certificate, send 
QSL card with OSO number and large 
BASE to call of contact operator, 

GOLDEN SHEARS AWARD 

In honor ol the 1903 Golden Shears 



140 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



WAYNE GREEN BOOKS 



i^ 







m 



:t f1 



tm 



m 



i.i - . 




fi 1 L | I ■ 






KILOBAUD KLASSROOM 

by George Young and Peter Stark 

Makes learning electronics fun and easy. First published as a series in Kilobaud Microcomputing, the 
book combines the Learning of essential theory with practical, hands- on experience. The course begins 
with basic electronic projects and culminates in the construction of your own programmable 
microcomputer. The direct instructional methods of authors Young & Stark make KILOBAUD 
KLASSROOM ■ simple way for you to acquire a solid background in digital electronics. 



BK7386 (419 pages). . 



• ■ ' • 







CM.CMQ* 






1 .*■ 




4 4 4 4 



* * ■ * 4 . 4 91T4VV 



H 



THE SELECTRIC INTERFACE by George Young 

You need the quality print thai a daisy wheel printer provides but ihe thought of buying one makes 
your wallet wilt. The SE1J-XTRIC™ INTERFACE, a step-by step guide to interfacing an IBM 
Sdectrie I/O Writer to your microcomputer, will give you that quality at a fraction of the price, 
(rijorm Young, ro-auihai oi KUobumd tflifTOtiiwi|Willwig vamffoitttl't popular "Kilobaud KlwBEOap" 
series, offers a low^cost alternative to buying a daisy wheel printer. TTie SELECTRIC INTERFACE 
includes: step-hy^tep instructions, tips on purchasing a used Select ric, information on various Setecnric 
models, including the 2740, 2980, and Dura 104 1 , driver software for Z80, 8080, and 6502 chips, tips 
rm interfacing techniques. With The SELECTRIC INTERFACE and some background in electronics, 
you can have a high- quality, low-cost t letter-quality printer. Petals not included. 



BK7!iSN \ 125 plIjLfO. 1 )) > ■ » 4 ■ ■ * ■ * ■ ■ ■ 1 ■ ■ * * t * ■ 1 



- ■ ■ - 



1 » m 1 * * 



r- m m . m 1 i r 



$12497 



GENERAL UCENSE STUDY GUIDE 

By Timothy M. Daniel N8RK 

This is the complete guide to the General License. Learning rather than memorizing is the secret. This 
is not a question-and-answer guide that will gather dust when the FCC issues a new test. Instead, this 
book will be a helpful reference, useful long after a ham upgrades to General, Includes up-to-date 
FCC rules and an application form. Order yours today and talk to the world. 

SC7358 (87 pages) . , . . * . . $6.95 




01 



GENERAL. 
LICENSE 
STUDY 
GUIDE 



by f m*Why niVml 



fflii&H 



*-L 




R 





*JS 



NOVICE 
LICENSE 

Mm. STaDY 



NOVICE LICENSE STUDY GUIDE 

By Timothy M. Daniel N8RK 

Here is tfie rntnt up-to-date novice guide available, It is complete with information about learning 
Morse code, has the latest FCC amateur regulations and the current FCC application forms, Thi* 
fguide is not a question/ answer memorization course but rather it emphasizes the practical side of get- 
ting a ham license and putting a station on the air. It reflects what the FCC expects a Novice to know 
without page after page of dull theory. The most current information still available at last year's price. 

SG7357 (98 pages) . . . , . . . . ..... ♦ , ,....., . , , ♦ ,,,>... $4.95 






1 



19 



G 




E3 






NEW WEATHER SATELUTE HANDBOOK by Dr. Ralph E Taggart WB8DQT 

i Here is the completely updated and revised edition of the best- selling Weather Satellite Handbook— 

containing all the information on the most sophisticated and effective spacecraft now in orbit. Dr- 
Taggart has written this book to serve both the experienced amateur satellite enthusiast and the 
newcomer. The book is an introduction to satellite watching, providing all the information required to 
construct a complete and highly effective ground station. Not jusl ideas, but solid hardware designs 
and all the Instruction necessary to operate the equipment are included. For the thousands of experi- 
menters who are operating stations, the book details ail procedures necessary to modify their equip- 
ment for the new series of spacecraft. Amateur weather satellite activity represents a unique blend of 
interests encompassing electronics, meteorology and astronautics. Join the privileged few in watching 
the spectacle of earth as seen from space on your own monitoring equipment. 

" *V ■ vCKJ \ 1 v« pages y ***«... . •'••-.*_•••#.'• * t * • # • 1 .... . ••»*.♦ 4 ..;..-■•.. «..**.... . *o ■ \jD 



i&H& 



agbsA 



WM 



*L-<* 



t;z- 





FOR TOLL-FREE ORDERING CALL 1-800-258-5473 
WAYNE GREEN BOOKS* PETERBOROUGH NH 03458 

Itemize your order cm a separate piece of paper and mail to Wayne Green Books. AM: Sales. Peter borough, NH 03458. Be sure to Include check or detailed 
credit card information (Visa. MC or AMEX accepted.) No C/O-D. orders accepted All orders add $ 1 ,50 for the First book, postage and handling, $ 1 00 each 
additional book; $10.00 per book foreign air mail. Please allow 4-6 weeks after publication for delivery. Questions regarding your order? Please write to 
( .'us turner Service at the above address. 









73 Magazine • January, 1983 141 



Sheep Shearing Contest in March, 1983, 
the members of New Zealand's Branch 46 
in Wairarapa are offering an award tor 
contacts- made that month with their 
members 

To be edible fo* J he sward on HF 
bands. 2l_ stations must have 10 points, 
VK stations must have 7 points, and D)( 



stations need 5 points. Net contacts 
count toward the award. 

On VHF, ZL2 stations need 15 points to 
qualify, other ZL stations have to get 7 
points, and DX stations must nave 3 
points Repeater QSOs count toward the 
award, but repeater/net contacts do not. 

Scoring is as follows: Golden Shears 
President ZL2AHU is worth 3 points; ctub 



station ZL20A. a ¥L operator farming 
branch member, or mobile station within 
Wairarapa are worth 2 points each, and 
any other member is worth 1 point 

Except lor crossband operation, any 
band/mode combination is allowed. How* 
ever, only one contact per member is per- 
mitted unless the member is operating the 



club station or working mobile within 
Wairarapa. No QSLs are required for the 
award: send your application with $2.00 
(NZ> or an equivalent international Money 
Order to Awards Manager, PO Sox 860. 
Masteiton, New Zealand Entries must be 
received before August 31, 1963 All pro- 
ceeds will go toward funding for an oper- 
ating room tor emergency situations 



A/ElfV PRODUCTS 



APOLLO X10 ANTENNA 

National Microtech, Inc.. has just in- 
troduced its new Apollo KlO antenna, 
which utilizes a Wool, eight segmc 
compression-molded fiberglass reflect or 
The reflector provides high strength-to- 
weJghl ratio and significantly reduces the 
size ot the shipping container, thus pn> 
vi tjang savings in handling and shipping 
costs. 

The X10 can be erected easily by two in- 
stallers. The individual reflector segments 
are Interchangeable and field-replaceable, 



unking indexing tabs for position and self- 
aJtQnrnenl 

The Apollo X1D delivers 40.1 dB gam at 
3 95 GHr Its tenured front surface diffuses 
sunlight and reduces solar healing at the 
local point, and the high-quality fiberglass 
material is impervious lo salt, pollutants, 
and contaminants thai may be encoun- 
tered in coastal and industrial areas 

The center-mounted "button hook" 
prime feed provides accurate alignment 
with the focal point without I he use of 
cables and other supporting gear. The LIMA 
Is located at the focal point whNo the rotor 




National ¥*crotecfr's Apotfo XW antenna 




Simpson's model 467E DMM, 

142 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



Is placed at the rear of the dish, permitting 
rotation of the teed through 360 degrees of 
polarization by remote control. 

For more Information, contact National 
Microtech, ffiOn PO Drawer E, Grenada MS 
38907. Reader Service number 481. 



UNITED STATES FREQUENCY 
ALLOCATION CHART 

An updated "Van an United States Fre- 
quency Allocation Chart" is now available 
tree ol charge from Van an Associates 
Electron Device Group. The four -color 
chart includes radio, television, point-to- 
point, microwave, satellite communica- 
tions, and millimeter wave frequency allo- 
cations. This 15" by 21" foldout wall chart 
features a ledger guide and is both color 
and line-coded for easy reference. 

Frequency allocations from 3 kHz lo 
300 GHz are divided Into eight one-order 
or-magnflude divisions. These divisions 
are color-coded to Illustrate frequency 
uses of government exclusive, nongov- 
ernment only, and government and non- 
government shared frequencies. Line cod 
in g is I hen used for the demarcation of 31 
specific frequency categories such as 
fixed satellite, radio navigation, land mo- 
bile, broadcasting, and meteorological 
satellite. 

For further information, contact Verran 
Associates. Electron Device Group Mar 
ketmg, 301 industrial Way. Ssn Carlos CA 
94070 Reader Service number 488 

AZDEN INTRODUCES 
NEW PCS-4000 

Japan Plezo Company, Lid,, and 
Amateur Wholesale Electronics have an- 
nounced their new PCS-4000 2-meter FM 
transceiver Like Its predecessors, the 
PCS 4000 utilizes keyboard frequency 
control, but many new features have been 
added, making this a truly unique radio. 

Some of the features are 8-MHz cover- 
age 1 142 to 149-995 MHz}, extremely small 
size (2 inches high by 5 -a inches wide by 
6 3 * inches deep), two banks of eight 
memones whteh can be scanned sepa- 
rately or together, capability (or up to 
eighi nonstandard repeater splits, and 
two priority channels. Other feaures m 
elude a full l&key louchloneTM pad built 
m, multicolored display for easy I unction 
recognition, discriminator scan centering, 
repeater reverse button, and free/vacant 
scan mode selection with auto- resume. 

For more Information, contact AmB- 
teur- Wholesale Electronics, trie, 8817 SW 
129 Terrace, Miami FL 33776: (303^233- 
3631, Reader Service number 483 

SIMPSON'S MODEL 467E 
LCD DMM 

Simpson Electric Company has intro- 
duced a new hand-portable LCD digital 
multimeter. Model 467E joins the Simpson 
line of LCD hand-portable DM Ms 

Features include peak hold to capture 
surge currents and voltages, a OontfrXrJty 
mode lo provide instant visuai'audibte 
checks for shorts and opens, and true rms 
capability for more significant measure- 
ments of n on -sinusoidal waveforms over a 
wide frequency range The 467E has 211 



ranges to provide full acidc voltage, cur- 
rent, and resistance (Including low-power 
Ohms} measurement capability. 

Ad di Hon ai features Include 0,1% ric V 
accuracy, high-voltage iran&iem protec- 
tion, a double fusing system, and color- 
coded front-panel graphics. Its size Is a 
compact 2" x 5.6" x 4,6" and its weight Is 
1% lbs. 

For further information, contact Simpson 
Eiectnc Company. 853 Dtf/Ktee Avenue> Ef- 
gin ft mi 20: (3 l2hW?226Q Reader Service 
number 48G\ 



SUBMIISUATURE 
CHANNEL SCANNER 

Midian Electronics, Inc.. has introduced 
a subminiature channel scanner It fea- 
tures ^channel capability on radios em- 
ploying crystal high switching, 1&-channel 
capability on radios using battery-line bi- 
nary address, and ^channel capability on 
radios using battery or ground switching. 
The scanner also has a priority channel 
scan capability as well as a three-second 
hold timer, manual advance, and an ad 
I u stable channel scan length. 

For further information, contact Mid fan 
Electronics, inc , 5907 E Ptma Street. Tuc- 
son AI 85712: (002*685^883. deader Ser 
vice number *87 

PLUG-IN DTMF DECODER 

Paiomar Engineers has announced a 
new single-digit decoder which is avail 
able for any ol the T6 DTMF digits. 

Replacing the I irm's older model T2< the 
new P2QD teal urea improved temperature 
stability, high Input Impedance (200,000 
Ohms), and a Vi- Ampere SPOT output re- 
lay. It operates from 12 volts dc, signal lev- 
ets from -25 to +5 dBm, and has a re- 
sponse time of 100 ms. The decoder plugs 
into a standard octal socket 

For further information, contact Pafo- 
mar Engineers. 1924 F vV Mission /road, 
Escondkto CA 92025: (714^-747-3343 




ill 




Patomar Engineers' P20Q DTMF decoder, 




team's IC290H transceiver 



tCOMS JC-290H 

tcom has announced the release of a 
new 2' meter mullimode mobile transceiver 
(he iC-290H r feat urine a powerful 2SWatl 
output and a highly sunFlghWeadable green 
readout in the same compact package as 
the K>29QA Other features and styling of 
the IO290H are the same as the previous 
model— the IG290A. These include 5 mem- 
ories lor storing your most worked frequen- 
cies, a can channel to make your favorite 
frequency fnstantly available. S-kHz FM 
tuning o* 1-kHtflQ0*H2 tuning on SSB, FM 
USB/LSB/CW modes, programmable offsets 
a priori I v channel that monitors 2 frequen- 
cies, and scanning ol memories or barn I 

For more information, contact icom 
America, inc., 2112 116th Avenue NE, Beite- 
vue WA 98004. 

ENCON PHOTOVOLTAIC 
PANELS 

Encon. Inc . d is rr ton tors of So fa re* pho- 
tovoltaic products for the Midwest, has in- 
troduced the new Solars* SX series of 
semicrystalline photovoltaic panels, us- 
ing fltate-oMhe-arl technology 

Solerex serxilcrystaNine cells offer 
unique advantages over earlier technol- 
ogy; including lower cost, increased pack- 
ing efficiency, and higher power output 
compared wilfi the traditional round sin- 
gle-crystal silicon cells, Semi crys tall in c- 
cefls are made by melting less than pure 
polycrystallme silicon, crystallizing it into 
rectangular bricks, and then sawing the 
bricks into wafers to make recta ngu Ear 
cells. The cost reductions afforded by the 
new process promise to bring prices down 
from S10O per Walt Id under $20 per Watt 
within the ne*l few years 

Soiarex suppplied the photovoltaic 
cells for the UoSAT {University of Surrey* 



OSCAR 9 satellite launched on October 6. 
1961 OSCAR 9 s four solar panels each 
COhla»n 408 high efficiency 2 cm x 2 cm 
cells. Each panel produces 27 Walts when 
fully illuminated. The Soiarex system is 
designed to produce 18 Watts peak power 
and 6 Watts average power m ortail to 
Charge the 14-voJt nlcad battery 

Encon. Inc, assembles complete pho- 
tovoltaic power systems for emergency 
ami primary communication applications, 
as well as residential and commercial 
packages Interested amateurs are invited 
to contact Encon, Inc . 27584 Schoofcratf. 
Livonia Mi 48T5Q Reader Service number 
479. 

ICOtVTS IC-R70 

GENERAL-COVERAGE 

RECEIVER 

Icom has just announced its new pro- 
fessional general-coverage receiver, the 
IC-R70\ 

It is a full generation newer and tea 
lures more fund ions than other less so- 
phisticated general-coverage receivers on 
the market. Features Include squelch on 
sideband, adjustable-width noise blanker, 
adjustable-speed age, passband tuning 
as standard, and adjustable notch fJ Iter as 
standard 

Other convenient features are high sta- 
bility, synthesized tuning with tuning 
speeds, an optional AM/FM mode, vari- 
able CW filter widths, dial lock, and two 
vfo's with data transfer Also, (he IC-A7D 
will operate transceive with the IC-72QA. 
making an ideal combination for the seri- 
ous DXer or CW buff, 

For more information, contact tcom 
America, frit, 21 f 2 116tft Avenue rV£ 
Beilevue WA 98004 








PoiyPhaser's new impulse suppressor. 



POLYPHASER'S IMPULSE 
SUPPRESSORS 

A new series of bulkhead-style impulse 
suppressors for coaxial lightning protec- 
tion was recently Inlrotiuced by PolyPhas- 
er Corporation. This new IS-650 series can 
easily replace older air gap-type arrestors 
and can be mounted on up to lf& ^Ihick 
bulkhead panels These weatherproofed 
gas lube protectors are designed for re 
peaters, base stations, and TVROs to t 
GHz; with typical (N> 1 dB loss and 1.1- 
io-T vswf. Their hefty 20-kA muh>stnke 
and 50- nanosecond turn-on time make 
protection againsi most direct strikes 
possible. They come complete with 
weather washer and stainless steel hard- 
ware in both N and UHF fittings. A tower 
mounting kit is also available. 

For further informal ion. contact Poly- 
Phaser Corporation. 7500 West Wtnd 
Boulevard, Ktsstmrnee FL 32741; (303) 
39&1807 Reader Sere ice number 485 

DC POWER SUPPLY 

Many mobile operators would like to be 
able to operate their mobile equipment al 
home on ac power mains, Tripp- Lite has 
just announced a product that meets that 
desire: a precision regulated dc supply 
that convert s 120 V ac into 138 V dc For 
example, CB radios, automobile tape 
players, tape recorders, high-power ster- 
eo systems, amateur radio equipment, lin- 
ear amplifiers, and marine- or business- 
band radios can now be used at home. 

The hew low-cost power supply saves 
the user money, since il also elnnlnales 
the expense of having to buy ac equip- 
ment. It features a solid-state Iniegraled 
circuit for precise regulation. A buiil-m 



filter ensures low^noise operation, and 
current-limiting electronic "fokiback is 
provided for automatic over current pro- 
tection. Other features include a heavy- 
duly power transformer for complete line 
isolation, a maximum ripple voltage of on- 
ly 0,1 volts from zero to full load, an on/off 
switch and indicator light on the lace- 
plate, and a UL-listed ac cord and plug 
ttype SPJ-ZK 

For more informal ton. write Trtpp-Ute* 
500 N Orfeans. Chicago SL606W Reader 
Service number 464, 



W9AV MORSE CODE 

TRANSLATOR FOR TRS-80 

COLOR COMPUTER 

J. C, Sprott W9AV announced some time 
ago his Morse-code programs for the TRS 
SO Mod t'Mod III computers Now, he has 
announced the availability of a Morse pro- 
gram in 16K extended color Basic for the 
TRS-80 color computer II is believed I hat 
this program is the only Morse-code pro- 
gram available for sending and receiving 
Morse code by way of the computer's cas- 
sette port 

With 9 programmable memories of 240 
characters each and a random-character 
"practice 1 " mode, the translator program al- 
lows you to send and receive the code by 
merely plugging the computer cassette 
plugs directly into the transmitter key jack 
and the receiver phone jack. Morse code 
may then be sent at speeds of up to 60 words 
per minute and received at speeds of up to 
30 words per minute, 

For more information, write Professor J. 
C. Sprott W9AV, 5002 Sheboygan, #307. 
Madison Wi 53705- Reader Service num- 
ber 480. 




tcom's IC-R7Q receiver. 



Tnpp-Lt te h s dc po wer supply, 

73M&gazme • January. 1983 143 



^L.,..jwtari.*b«brit«h4*tfbtfb«fc«.# 



■ MMM,. L ,M ll ,MT,1 l ,MMiM M.MMM.H* 



SLEP SPECIALS 

AEA 

MfiA-flO Reader Recede Only. . . . $2G9 QQ 

MfiA-RC Receive/Code Gomreftef .... 395 00 

MM-2 Morsemalic Ultimate Keyer 135.00 

CK-2 Contest Memory Keyer . . . . . . 99 00 

tsopole 144 £M Antenna 35 00 

Isopoie 220 Antenna 35,00 

BARKER A WILLIAMSON 

37&15 Smart Bend Drpole Antenna 3,5-30 MHz, 90 fl.,5 KW PEP. $134 00 

370-10 Portable Windo* Sill Apartment/Mobile- Ho me Whip Antenna 

covers2,6, 10. 15. 20, 40 Meters plus 27 MHz ...« 3950 

331 A Grid Dip Meter Solid Slate, Range 2 MHz thru 230 MHz, Takes 

9V Transistor Banery , . T . 1 12,00 

374 Dummy Load Walimeler DC to300 MHz, 1500 Watts Input. .-,« 199.00 

375 Coax Switch. 6 Position Rear SO 239. 22 50 

376 Coax Switch 5 Position Side SO-239 , 22.50 

COLLINS/ROCKWELL 

55G-1 VLF Preselector for 51S-1 and KWM-380, Limited Supply $375.00 

312B-5 Station Console/VFO, Limited Supply 550,00 

DRAKE 

TFh7A XCVR , SI 

TR-5 XCVH 

PS-7P/S25Amp. 

PS 75 PfS 15 Amp/25 Amp Surge. 

RV-75 Synthesized VFO 

R7A Receiver 0-30 MHz Digital 



• - - T ■■ ■■ 



439 00 
695 00 

.209 00 
179 00 
269 00 

1.399 QC 



■ 



. . . . . 



IC 720A XCVR 

IO730XCVR 

IC-740XCVR 

IC-2AT Hand HeHJ WTTP 2M 

IC 25A 2M Mobile 25W 

IC-45A New Model 44O-450 MHz Mobile, 10W. FM 

IC-290H New Model AH Mode 2W FM/USB/LSB/CW 25 Watt. 

Easy Tc-Read Green LiO fiead-Oul, Scans. 

IC-R70 New Model Professional General-Coverage Receiver. 

Many Beautiful Features 

MIRAGE 

8-23 2M 2^30W Amplifier 

B 10S2M 10/8DW Amplll lerfPreamp. 

B-1016 2M lO/ieoWAmpllfler/Preamp 

B-30 16 2M 30M6QW Ampllf leryPreamp . . t . 

D-1010 440 107100W Amplifier 

RC 1 Remote Control Head , A 1 1 Models wJ 1 B ft . Cable 



St.140.00 

690.00 

. 98S00 

., ,235,00 
30600 

... call 



r m • • B ■ pa i 



■ ■ ■ ■ h 



. ... i ..... . 



* fr + 4 + 



4B9.00 
685 00 



S7&.00 
154 00 
239.00 

...... ^ , H r HJV-tPU 

4 ■•»-» ■> ■ m I ■ I * ■ 7rUU 

24.95 



l 1 i 1 



■ X ■ ■ I 



We accept NilC t Visa Of Checks. Add shipping FOB Otto T N.C, Save 
money by ordering today at these Low Discount Prices. Mail or phone 
Bill Slap 704-524-7519. 

SLEP ELECTRONICS COMPANY 
P.O, BOX 100, HWY. 441, DEPT. 73 
OTTO, NORTH CAROLINA 28763 

."367 




!gHHHHBLflllllHIHltllHlllfllllJ.f.tfft.tTl 



2 GHz Microwave Receiving Systems 



The new Micro-System features a machined 18" 
parabolic reflector for maximum efficiency, a linear 
feed-point downconverter with ceramic high perfor- 
mance RF preamplifier transistor, a variable 12 to 18 volt 
regulated power supply and 50' of 75U coaxial down- 
lead P including a 3' jumper and matching transformer. 
The Micro-System includes a full 6 month warranty. 

Micro-System (MS-021 ) M59" 

Micro-System (MS^578) *169" 

Micro-System (MS-645) ., *179" 

Shipping & Handling: USA. . *4" AK. HI & PR M0** 



Data Service Company 612-636-9469 



^346 



3110 Evelyn Street 
Roseville, MN • 55113 




HAM HELP 



i 



- 




I am looking for schematics for a 
Slllromcs LA 550 bi linear. 

Arthur Lift 

Route 1. Box 329 

CentrevlMeMD 21617 

I need help troubleshooting my Spec- 

tionicsdigltal readout DD-tC. The display 
has quit counting, and I need e schematic 
for it 

Or. M. R. Klein WA4GUH 

£01 East Arbor Ave. 

Pt. St. Lucie FL 13452 



I am fooking for a manual for the 
Tektronnt 524 D oscilloscope and a meter 
movement for a Bird model 43 wattmeter. I 
vwiN pay any reasonable price and postage. 

Don DeLunB WB4LJE 

830 PI nee real Ave, 

Bedford VA 24523 

Can anyone help me eliminate the chirp 
and drift tn my Heath HG-10B vto? 

Dave Artman N9CZJ 

599 Wheel Estate* 

Greenwood IN 46!42 



'MULTI-BAND SLOPERS1 

160, 80, and 40 meters 

Outstanding DX performance of slopers is well known Now you can en 
loy 2 or 3 band BIG-SiGNAL reports! Automatic bandswilchmg • Very 
low SWR -Coan leed » 2kw power ■ Compact - Ground or tower feed 
♦ Hang from any support 25 ft, high or higher ■ Easy lo Install * Very 
low profile • Complete Instructions ■ Immediate shipment-Check ok 

3 BAND SLOPER- 160. SO. & 40 Meters 60 ft Jong $ 43 m frt ppfl 

1 * 



• 



2 BAND SLOPER 80 & 40Meler* - 41 ft lone 



5 30.00 hi ppd 



3-BANO NO TRAP DlfQLE. 160, 80,&40M -f t3fl. long S 66 oo Irl ppd 
2-BANO NO TRAP DIPQLE, 



804 40M ■ S4lt tortQ S49QQ frt. ppd 



FOR AODN L INFO on these and other unique antennas: send SASE 

W9INN ANTENNAS 
BOX 393-S MT. PROSPECT, IL 600S6 




&€^S?£^S»^^$^5^&^3 



MOBILE POWER 
For Your H.T\ 

on| y $2T25ppdi 

The new MOBILE ENERGIZER will provide 
operating power for your HJ. from any 12 volt source,! 
and charge it's meads at the same time! Featuring 
a time-proven regulator circuit enclosed in a tough,! 
rugged housing that plugs into the cigarette light- 
er jack of your car, it will work with any Synthe- 
sized H.T. except Icom, Arden. and Tempo S-15. 
Specify H.T. model when ordering 

ONTEMPORARY ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS 



P BOX 570549 

WIAMJ.FL 33157 

005)25^7560 



»* 1&4 




Introducing the POWER PACKETfrom VoConi 



An innovative new product that you can 
combine with your VoCom Power Ampli- 
fier to obtain the functions of the famous 
VoCorn Power Pocket™ using any hand- 
held radio, 

AF POWER — 2 to 3 watts of road-norse- 
overcoming audio to your vehicle speaker 
or to external Packet Speaker'* (optional). 

EASY HOOK-UP - Packet Bracket™ at 
bottom of Power Packet, provides place to 
clip almost any make or model handheld. 
Connects to handheld through pm jacks. 
Hooded tight on Power Packet illuminates 
portable's front panel 

CHARGE POWER — 35mA charge on re- 
ceive, 400 mA when mic is keyed Unless 
your handheld draws more than 400 mA, 

EEei, Cachet Brae km, Packet Mk, Racket Speakiir arxJ VoCorn are trademarks of VbCom Products Corp 



you can talk as long as you wish and the 
batteries will be at least as charged as 
when you started. 

MIC PREAMP — adjustable: tie in your 
handheld directly without changing its mic 
input. Also makes Power Packet compati- 
ble with most standard mobile mics. Op- 
tional Packet Mic*" available. 

Suggested retail $34.95. See your favorite 
amateur radio dealer. 

lol 1 om 

PRODUCTS CORPORATION 

65 E Palatine Rd„ Prospect Heights, IL 60070 

(312) 459-36B0 ^ 



144 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



FREE CATALOG 




NEW! 

CATALOG OF 

HARD TO-F1ND 

PRECISION TOOLS 

^354 



Atxa contains test equipment 

plus wide selection of 

tool kits and cas e s 

JiMtM-n's new catalog i* jam -packed with 
murr than 2000 qualify items Your single 
suHjrt ♦- fm hard -to- find precision tools and 
tool kils used by electronic technicians, 
scientists, engineers, instrument mechan- 
ic*, schools, laboratories and govemmenl 
agencies. Send for your free copy loday? 



JENS€N TOOLS INC 

/tfi^S 4t»Th STHt^T pfxx-NtV A J- 85040 



C.B. SPECIAL 

(Repeat of a sell out) 

CONVERT THESE TO 
IOMETER FM 

New My Ga»n 40 cfianntl pnnted circuit 
Do*' 0s Assembly 1 Squelch pol volume 
con{FO< and channe* s*iicrh not tncludedi 
Bo*'ds sold as <s Dimension 6 Kff 

1-9 pes $7.50 ••. 
10-49 pes $6.50**. 

While quantises I AST} 

REMOTE 40 CHANNEL C B 
R#mot*s hawe a metal trame Speaker 
plastic case and control mtt not included 
Sold as is si4.95»ft 

C B, BARGAIN 

C B boards missing pans 0' damaged 
Can b« used lot spare patts Buy several ' ' 

$3.50 ea 
Orde* mlormalion Please add 1* 00 ro» 
SrH wra UPS COD s accepted lor orders 
tOlaJincj £50 00 c more Florida residents 
add 4 B t> sales lax Minimum order 115 00 
Foreign orders US funds only add 20*> tO* 
5 h M AST £ fl C AF! D an d V I S A accep I ed 

Surplus Electronics Corp. 

7294 NW 54th Si. 

Miami FL 33*66 *^ 69 

P H P 3G5-S87-B22S 




•ample Issue 

only S2.50 

PPD 

OUR WTH YEAR! 



AMATEUR TELEVISION 



MAGAZINE 



** 115 



-frD* Oft SPECIALIZED COWH-'N IT A HO* MC*0 ANATEUT 



1 year 

2 year 

3 year 



Surface 

U S /Canada 

M«*«co 

S 10.00 

2000 

38 00 

56 00 



Surface Airmail Airmail 

M Central All Other 

Foreign S. America Foreign 

S 1300 S 20 00 S 23.00 

% 2S0Q * 4000 S 46.00 

S 50 00 S 73 00 % 90.00 

S 74 QQ $116 00 S134 00 

Microwave and Computers 



% 
I 
I 



PubHshQtf 12 times per year by Mike Stone WBQQCD 
P.O. Bo* Hi Lowden, Iowa 52255 0408 



Microwave 

Field Disturbance 

Motion Detector Kit 

• Range 100' unobstructed 

• Safe low power 10mW output 

• Detects motion from 0.1 to 
20MPH 

Unlike ultrasonic motion detectors, the Microwave 
Field Disturbance Mellon Detector, can see Ihru non 
metallic walls. Output la ISLCX or N.C. relay contacts 
which can operate alarms, lights, or electric doora. 
Output can be programmed from seconds to hours 
and will reset automatically 

Kit contains: 10.525 GHz transceiver 1 module. 10 db 
dtecasl horn antenna, all components, PC board, and 
instructions. Requires 10-14 VDG. 70mA standby, 
il 0mA activated. 

Model MT2 $89,95 PPD in U.S. 
COD add $2. N.J, residents add 
5% sales tax, 

MicroTekf (20 1)548-4321 

35 West Francis St, 
Iselin, New Jersey 08830 



^196 



SYNTHESIZED 

SIGNAL GENERATOR 



HADE in 
USA 




MODEL 

SG10DD 

$349 95 

pins shipping 



• Cov%rsTQ0 to 185 MHz m 1 kHz steps with thumb- 
wheel dial • Accuracy T pan per 10 million at all fre- 
quencies * Internal FM adjustable from to 100 kHz 
at a 1 kHz rate * Spurs and noise at leas! 60 dB be- 
low carrier * RF output adjustable from 5-500 mv at 
50 ohms • Operates on 12 Vdc @ 1/2 Amp • Avail- 
able tor immediate delivery * S3 49 95 plus snipping 

• Add-on Accessories available to extend freq. 
range, add infinite resolution, voice and sub-audible 
tones, AM, precision 120 dB calibrated attenuator 

• Call Tor details • Dealers wanted worldwide. 



VANGUARD LABS 

196-23 Jamaica Ave., Mollis, NY 11423 
Phone: (212) 468-2720 



^311 



QUALITY MICROWAVE TV SYSTEMS 



1,9 to 2.5 GHz Antennas 

Complete System (Rod Style as pictured) SI 24.95 

Complete System 
[Reflector Style as pictured! SI 49.95 

Down Converter, Assembled & Tested S64.95 

Power Supply |12 in I8v| $49.95 

Also Dish Style Antennas In Stock, 



Galaxy *m 
Electronics 

6007 N. 61 St Ave. 
Glendale, Az. 
85301 

(602)247-1151 

COD's 
Quantity Pricing 



[MDVrrtCci'crl 




90 DAY WARRANTY 
PARTS A LABOR 



TIME-DUAL TONE DECODER S15 

The LJM2RK decoder kit converts your rec- 
eiver into a special receiver or control, When 
a user-selected time-tone combination is rec- 
eived, the output provides a relay control for 
activating speakers or other devices. 

INPUT: Audio from transceiver, scanner, etc* 
OUTPUT: SPST (N.O .) relay. 

FEATURES: Single or dual tones adjustable 
over the T/T ranged Adjustable time delay # 
Relay output* Manual or auto reset«Single 
tone ON latching with different single tone 
reset OFF* Operates on 1 2 VDO# Interfacing 
of multiple boards for multi-digit sequential 
activation and reset, 

APPLICATIONS: Call-up systems Repeater 
or commercial controls* Etc, limited only to 
your imagination •Write for information on 
the LJM2RK for your application. 

LJM2RK decoder kit includes all component, 
relay, and P.C. Board... SI 5 plus SI. 50 ship 

LJM2KC enclosure kit includes molded case, 
speaker, input cable $5 plus SI- 50 ship* 

THE METHENY CORPORATION 

204 Sunrise Drive, Madison, IN 47250 ^2<K 

See Product Review Jan. 19 S3 issue of 73 



"KEEP IN TUNE 
WITH THE WORLD" 

"TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE BY F.C.C. 
LICENSED TECHNICIANS: 

•raps in 

•alignmenis 

♦modifies lions 

•installation of custom circuits 

"PRODUCTS AVAILABLE: 

• QSK keying 
*VOX 

• Powtf supplies— [memory keep alive] 

'Ail above circuits lor solid state equipment 
manufactured by 

f / 
<z:ON^K^*^r!^iOAHnor^s 

17325 Madonna Dr Lansing, Michigan 48917 

(517) 027-2650 or 627-2879 1 59 





^See u$t of Advertisers on page FM 



COLLINS RECEIVER 

R-388/C0LLINS 51J3 RECEIVER - o 5-30.5 

MhzAM-CWin 30 tends. 
1 Mhr per band. Band- 
width 0.2 6 Khz. 500 
Khz IF 5- step crystal 
selectivity. "S" meter 
and 100 Khz calibration 
points. Requires 115/230 VAC 60 Hz. 10 1 /?x19jc13", 
56 IDs sn UseEHeparabfe: #925: $265. 

Checked- 4400: $330. Manual, partial repro: $10. 

RF TUNER 

From 400 wan transmitter, 

has Jennings UCSXF 

1200 7,5 KV vacuum 

variable capacitor and 

0,5-50 uH variable ribbon 

inducer, Selectable 50 ^^^^^^ffe 

ohm or whip antenna load and turns ^* 

counters. 24 VDC required tor capacitor and inductor 

drives: schematic inducted, 13%ft1QHic5tt* ( 24 lbs 

sh #RF-f200/GfiC14 + used-eaceUenJ $195. 

Prices FOB Lima. • VISA. MASTERCARD Accepted 

A Mow t€r Shipping • Write lor Our FREE CATALOG 

Address Dept 73 ■ Piioire 4 1 9/227-6573 



FAIR RADIO 5ALEi^2 

10"6 I, FUHFKA • Ron HQ5 * LIMA OHIO - 4S602 



73 Magazine ■ January, 1983 145 




SOFTWARE 
FOR V I C 

TWICE « flXH F« VCMt H>C V. 
TUO WWWW 9* « SIMOLE CflSSFTTC. 

TIC BilGLE MTDffft § WTD+fl FtM/LAS*, . . . «.)? 

T«l£E EL&CXT VflOt 1 RKTB** FORTIUS, ffl~» 

BASIC 1 «D*E CIEETKCHLC FORHJLRS. •&.« 

HIIIHI|ll|ltinttllMftUMHtll|Mtl|lllt*M 

SIMPLE PWWWW 
rtOtrat CUlK TAIT^Ri • ■ + •-***»**» + ■■+**»*■•■■■■»■ afl, ?3 

oivE3 vou pracncE rhd testi vou Few a-a hph. 

WITH TOTHLLV WHDOrt Ft WE CHftRfCTEft CODE OROUPS. 

AMATEUR ftflUlO DATA SVSTEH fl^W 

RECOBJ CALLS! W* WW. C1TV. 6TflT£, COHTRCT I, 
DATE, Tilt. FRE9, (X ERCH COHTRCT, » CONTACTS 
PER FILE, UH.1HITED HUTOE* OF FILES, REQUIRES 
R niHII-Mi OF » ADDITION r*eC*V. FREE C-« 

CASSETTE SUPPLIED FOR DATR, OR 1UY SI9K VERSIOH 
AfdJ STORE I2M CONTACTS OH PRpOOTH DISK, 

RjL PROORRnS RVRILAJLE ON DISK— TOD f3.it 

VIRGINIA RE5IDEMT9 ACD WL *€ *** PO$T«QE< 
SEX9 CR9I- DCGK 01 «W ORJEK TO 

RU33 SaFTUIRRE LTD. 
P.O. *W 3?* HORTMCST RTRTIW 
OCSRREAKE, W, 23322 
..<••*> 42I-33J4 

*>• 207 



DIGITAL DISPLAY 



DAY 




FREE TRIAL 
YAESU 
HEATH 

DRAKE 
COLLINS 

KENWOOD 



EH TIESU BI6ITJU. TjISPUTO C9NOTJ5 RS YteSl IEM» *ATH 
CDLtlK MD Dtt«£ TMKZIVUS gUI'ftlB MS rajWSWTUS. 
5 ACT I'VE ttS LEA SIGHS Ittt MM Tfl la Mz. IEM ffltL 10 Mi 
DiGIT DEFEAT 5HITW, F«fl QQLB AM. 100 Ml DRIFT II 2% US* 

1 3/T IKR, * i/r «IK I i ur PEEP, steel u« is buoc. 

vamm t*mi fmtx. it nmv*t> 4uMHk urns f» Mean, wtut 
MHiLi«i MMt mrauT mw itintuTia* tr njtfs m una 
tamiae jica g» tm UDiot- <cttii hit* *■ • wfiEu mn 

— 15.00 



if rem ectehhl <td j*c* n est* r ^ a trs, «c . 



Ot TUtiy-ittti, *4j« a mii/'tHtr fujt/jAti *»- 



Cttft IBID «£M JUt rot 

ttlMI REBUtREB. ****- IU0.QO 



TS520 TSS20 TS10Q TS600 S599 TW9 PUOl FUQ1 fffi? 

fTHlBl mrltw — ■ — -- all Pftftt* i ihfu." tus^oo 

■755 sehils *KMW staiea *3ZS sen its *!M khies FW]X HCCM 
•FT1QD *FT4D0 JJMIL'FTSHI t J7n *H«D0-J03 "Sa-IOQ- 1QZ 
■SB3QD-5D3 "HRlftBn — all parti S INW, ■ * I / ^ . DO 

YC2Z1 for FTOKMt) n/D 3EHIAL , FRJ1 T57Q0, ? DI&. — 175, DD 

SEND U.S. CflSHlEHS WFCK Dt K.-D- . 30 DAY flDNEV SACK. «U Mt 
HETUflN fl3ST*6f. Hflirt ^JTH «DB, £ SEKtAi N», Fd* WFdltWTIW, 
K^ITE If Y&JP HA^IO H NOI LIITEEr—UtLL WKE. DUE VB *fcln>A«T fi 



G RA N O 
P.Q, fra Z27S 

HLAIJE WASl. 

(I.S.A. «» *J 530 *5S1 



S Y 



T E IVIS 

LWttJET l.C 



THE 

BEST PLACE 

To Look For 

New & Used 

Equipment 

Buy-Sell -Trade 

Our 4th Year 



huts 



*curs 



TEST Sf " °*T>Ct 

*um? tUTf 

— * u °"n-| , 



NUTS & VOLTS 
MAGAZINE 

PO BOX 1 1 I I -G • PLACENTLA. CA 92670 
(714)632-7721 ^137 

JOIN THOUSANDS OF READERS 
NATIONWIDE. EVERY MONTH 

U.S.A. SUBSCRIPTIONS 
$ 7.00 - 1 YR 1RD CLASS MAIL 
SI 2.50 - I YR. 1ST CLASS MAIL 
$25.00 - LIFETIME - 3RD CLASS 



JSa. With Free Classified Ad 



t*OF<**C<V<I 



M 



RELIABLE MICROWAVE TV ANTENNAS 



2.1 to 2.6 GHz Frequency Range 

34db System Gain (or Greater] 



Complete System (as pictured) $149.95 
Down Converter Probe Style 

(Assembled and Tested) S 64.95 

Power Supply (12V to 16V DC+) 

(Assembled and Tested) S 59.95 



PETERSON 

ELECTRONICS 

4558 Auburn Blvd. 
Sacramento- CA 95841 
1916} 4864071 

COO* 

SPECIAL QUANTITY 

PRICING 

Dealers Wanted 




1 YEAR WARRANTY 
PARTS 6 LABOR 



4 



Mo'.'efCanl 




CA 



O 
O 

C0 






a 




YAESU FT-207R OWNERS 

AUTO SCAN MODULE AND BATTERY 
SAVES KIT 

15 minutes to in- 
stall; scan restarts 
when earner drops 
off. busy switch 
controls automatic 
scan on*off; in- 
cludes module and 
instructions, 

Model AS-1. 525.00 

FT 207R BATTERY SAVER KIT 
MODEL BS-1 S14J5 

' No more dead batteries due to memory bach- 
up 

'30% less power drain when squelched 
'Simple to Install; step-by-step Instructions 
and parts included 

4 4 mA memory backup reduced to SOD A A 
*45 mA receiver drain reduced to 30 mA 
"Improved audio fidelity and loudness 

ENGINEERING CONSULTING 

P,(X Sox 3966 ^ w 

ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA 92B03 




PACKET RADIO 
TREASURE TROVE 



BOAfMJ 




POWER 
SUPPLY 

BOARD 
COMPUTE** 

SURPLUS FWANCIAL TERMWAL CONTAINING: 

• 202 TYPE MODEM BOARD: O-IMO t»ud. separate 600 or,m 
•udto atmn TTldigita< 1 5 * 5 S' 

• SoftOA CPU BOARD: Wiin sorted tv Asa 2706s Also In 
tocfeirts a?5i FTOgrammatm* Commutiicanong knteriacc 
(USARTy, B253 Tnple ProgrummnE^B lnierva> Timer, 8226 
Sytilorrt Cunlra^er 3-Slate Bus Duvef. 2^6 bylQS RAM. 29 DlhBr 

support (Cs, xtal, dock iC 7,&x1Q 

• ENCLOSED POWER SUPPLY : With pwr cord &. swnch + GV 
■vf S.5A, +12V^ 350rna, - SV ftp SSOmi, plua 2 umeguteled 
voltagei lor display 3x4x6 

■ DOCUMENTATION PACKAGE: lr*ciuri« Mhemalics A Terh- 
rwcally Oriented User Manual 

• MiSC .: SO Key Deomai 4 Puixtiofl Kayboard. 16 Digit Fiuores 
com Drspiay Wag SUnpe Ciedil Card Reader, Speaker and 
MORE 

Units Ara removed from aerw* and «n good wwtwig concMxMi. 
I4gh rfialrf/ modam consmjciun irMouQtioot Each * pan * Ml 
{rfMMiaittBitnaNpmer* Large quanaty n rtoch You'dlvwlc) 
buy a iot of tufteys 



PRICE. SURFACE UPS INCUICO 
DOCUMENTATION PACKAGE 



$S 



ELECTROVA1UE INDUSTRIAL 

p o aoR it r * 







GO MOBILE WITH YOUR H.T.! 

Model I— icom IC-2A/T, Etc, 

Model K-1 lor TR 2500 

— slides on bottom of radio 




Guaranteed! 



! ■■■■ ! Mum 



Model K-TR-2400; 

— powered tnru battery plug 

Model N - FT 208R 

Model T — Simple mod lor Tempo 



■ ' « ' ; ■ *--^p ..« .««i . i m« «i»» ■»■■>■ 



csm 



NOW FOR FT 20BR S TR 2500 

Model Y — FT-207R. 
—tits into battery com part me nt 

'A unique battery efimtnator" 
HANOI TEK Regulator allows 
constant handheld operation 
from auto DC or base supply 
with no nlcad drain and 
WITHOUT RADIO MODIFICA- 
TION! $24.95 PPD in USA. CA 
add ST, 50 Sates Tax. 
*^460 

HANDJ-TEK 
P.O. BOX 73m, LA PUENTE. CA 01746 





CB TO TEN METER 
CONVERSION KITS 




10 METER FM — Limiter discrimi- 
nator board with specific instruc- 
tions to fit over 80 different AM & 
SSB chassis 

SSB-AM KITS— Now in stock 
kits for most CB models— 23 or 40 

rhsn n a I ^ 

NEW & USED— FM— SSB-AM 
converted C.B/s in stock 
ANEXTER MARK ANTENNAS 

—You saw them at Dayton. Now in 
stock the HW-3 three band helewhip 
that covers 10—15—20 meters with 
no traps 

FREE CAT A LOG— Write or call 
today INDEPENDENT 

CRYSTAL SUPPLY COMPANY 



141 Rt. SA> Bok 183 

Sandwich, Ma 0256^0183 

(617) 888*4302 



^78 



FREE! FREE! FREE! 

Si ■ I.I ■ 



- SUBP^ U s uPP U ! _ - 

» 9 p °oeo^o*°L. 90006 g 



146 73 rVfagez/ne • January, 1983 



AMSEY 

LECTRONIC'S 
"** Inc. 



PARTS WAREHOUSE 



We now have available a bunch of goodies too 
good to bypass items are limbed so order today 



2575 Baird Rd. 
Penfield, NY 14526 

716-586 3950 



MINI KITS - YOU HAVE SEEN THESE BEFORE NOW 

HERE ARE OLD FAVORITE AND NEW ONES TOO. 

GREAT FOR THAT AFTERNOON HOBBY. 



"M 

UINI 
MIKE 




* super nign performance FM wr re- 
ess roffce kit 1 Transmits a stable 
signal up to 300 yrt'ds witfi eicep- 
jooai audio Quality by means of lie 
Mult m eiectrel mike Kit includes 
:ase mi*e on -off switch, antenna 
satiety ami super >nst ructions this 
s me hnesi unit available 

M-3 K*r fuss 

: M-3 W< red a n a Tested 19. 95 




: M Wkelen Mlfcr Kit 

ransmits up To 300' to 
iy FW broadcast f fl- 
ip uses any type of 
ri*e Runs On 3 to 9V Type FM*? 
as added sensitive mike preamp 

age 

M-l kil 1X95 FM-2hit $4.95 



Universal Tinier Kil 

^oveOes itie basic parts and PC 
30Ard required to p'onae J MXIfCe 
>r precision Tm.mg ard po'5£ 
jene*at«on Uses 555 timer lC and 
nciudes a range of parts for most 
iffipng needs 

JT-5 Kil 15.95 



Color Organ 

See music come 
alive 1 3 different 
lights flicker wl* 1 
music One light 
each for, high, 
mfd-range and 
lows Each indi- 
vidually adjust- 
able and drives up 
to 300 W runs on 
110 VAC 

Complete kit 
ML-1 
$8.95 



VK**o ModolatDi Kit 
Convert* an* TV to video mofnioT Super 
llflblff tunable wer tt> H Runs on 5 
15V accepts siff *-deo signal Best unit on 
th* mertef Compitff *■! ¥0-1 f 7 95 



Ltd BJtnfcy Kit 
A great altentron get- 
ler which alternately 

Hashes 2 jumbo LED& 
Use for name badges, 
bullons warning 
panel lights anything? 
Runs on 3 to 15 voHs 
Complete kit BL-1 




Super Sleuth 
A super sensitive amp li- 
fter which will pick up a 
pin drop at T5 feet' Greal 
for man no ring baby's 
room or as general pur- 
pose amplifier FulJ ? w 
rftis output runs on 6 to 
15 volts uses 8-45 ohm 
speaker 
Complete M BN-9 

$5 95 



CPO-t 

Runs on 3- 1 2 Vtfc 1 wall 

Alarm Audio Oscillator 



Out t KHZ good for CPO 
Complete kit 12 95 



Whisper Lighl KM 

An interesting kit small mike 
picks up sounds and converts 
them to ho/ The louder the 
sound, the brighter the light 
includes mike controfs up to 
300 W runs on 110 VAC 
Complete kit WL-i 
S695 



Mad Blaster Kil 

Produces LOUD ear sftattenngand 
attention getting s«ren like sound 
Can supply up 1o 15 watts of 
obnoxious audio Runs on 6- 15 VOC 



MB-1 Kil 



M 95 




Tone Decoder 
A compleip tone deco- 
der on a single PC 
board Features 400- 
5000 Hi adjustable 
range via 70 turn pot voMagerego 
lation 567 IC Useful Tor touch- 
tone burst detection FSK etc 
Can also be used as a stable tone 
encoder Runs on 5 to 12 volts 
Complete HH TO-1 15.95 



Siren Kil 
Produces upward and downward 
wail characteristic of a police 
siren 5 W peak audio output runs 
on 3-15 volts uses 3-45 ohm 
speaker 
Complete kit SM-3 I2S5 



to Hi Tirrw Bitt 

Rim* onfi IS d'pC Ln* current 1?5m*l 1 
fun ma n Hi MCUfM » TB ' Nil \ ■ ■ 

"M " fcSSttf HIS 




Call your Phone Order in Tod a. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded 
CO D add %2 50 Minimum order S*» 00 
Orders under $10.00 add Si. 50 Add 6"> tor 
postage, insurance, handling. Overseas add 
15%. N.Y. residents add 7% tax 



CLOCK KITS 

Yrjyr old la vrj riles are here again Qver 7,000 Sold to Dire 
Be one or the gang and order yours today' 

Try your hand at building the finest looking ctock on !he 
market Its satm finish anodized aluminum case looks great 
anywhere, while six 4' LEO digits provide a highly readable 
display This is a complete kit. no extras needed, and M only 
lakes 1-2 hours to assemble Your choice of case colors: 
silver, goJd, black (specify) 

Clock kit. 12/24 hour, DCS $24.95 

Clock with 10 mm fD timer. 12 '24 hour. DC- 10 129.95 

Alarm clock. 12 hour only. DOS S29.95 

12V DC car clock. DC-7 129.95 

For wired and tested clocks acid S10 00 to kit price 
SPECIFY ,2 OR 24 HOUR FORMAT 



SATELLITE TV KIT 




■mag* f»j*ction luii> tunarjte auito to n?cw«T 
tudden' wOcamw V rtiwJe by two PLL dMTXKSu 
lalor tor ^iceHenl Thresfrold performance, tight 
tracking AFC fa assure drift Ire* receplion, and 
of course, full ?4 channel tunable coverage 

Build yttut aalsllim TV system ifound 1Mb USB. 
C lOM 1 ton 1 fro-u ann a ol rm^a il rni-d y n«v« m d no* 
it i av»iljol« In hit form al ■ new 1o*pcic# Ordflt 
THE POCULAfl SAT TEC RECOVER IM KIT FORM! y*ut% )«3* T 



PARTS PARADE 



Fftituredl m m Radto Ehdrofuca magarine o o mf 
fFton/ iU*y 93. rhe tomtit* R2B s*t tee TV 
receiver m now operaturta lrt thovsands o* »oce 
ttoPi*. Tnfl R2B RJ eiuy to OU»ld. p'»«trhed. 

plalufl ftoarfJd rtUfi scroencO componenl Ui>nu1 
d&suresaccurale cam-ponent placeman i *ni 1 1 he 
i-rincal \f mcI Inn and local oscillator mra pre- 
aE.sambkKt and aligned! All parts ale included 
for the R2B. altiacsiirt taae. pdwel tupQly, 
descriptive orjeraimg manual as well as com- 
plete ■nemtHf instruclioni, Features Of Itie re- 
CBner mciude. dual convwuor design lor bes? 



A compel* SetaflilaTV %i«em rerjuvea 
a diah antenna. LKA pew t*4*s* amei< 
t»&\. Heoervar end leodulatc* 

WS Recover Rir 545900 

P2 B Receiver , Wired and T mil ed 359&00 

12fJ-KAvantokLNA H9i.« 

HM3RFMortul«1oi **9H5 

Prices include domestic UPS etilpprng 
ama insurance 



IC SPECIALS 



LINEAR 



Mi 


t 15 


m 


^aji%W SI M 

■^ f 1 SO 

T^ t as 


i56 


tioo 




tin 

n 00 


s6? 


(t 25 


Ml 


tO 13 00 


I4^S 


1 JO 


390fJ 


* 50 


1914 


12.95 


3038 


S3-95 




CMOS 


nti 


-- 50 


KJ13 


^■PP 50 


inai 


^■.JVViTi* 1 - 85 


1CI49 


111* 11 50 


«m 


$9.00 


pan 


S200 


«^iA 


$1 35 


3639 


$1 7b 


READOUTS 


=M) M« 


* 2 C tt e* 


7 NO»TSio FC* 100 


^Ah, niMP7T30 13 t * 100 


-IP ;*s« 


ex a a 00 




SPECIAL 



11C90 

ton© 

7^07A 
72160 
7107C 

5375ABG 
7001 



El 5.00 
$ 1.25 
S17.50 
S 550 
$2100 
512.50 
$ Z95 
S 2J9S 
S 6.50 



RtsUtor Ass t 
Assart rnent oi Popular values - 
watt Cul lead For PC mounting ' -" 

Cenler ':■•" leads, baq of 3D0 Of 
more? 

ST. SO 



Switches 
Mmi toggle SPOT St .00 

Red Pjsfiriuttofis N O 3 Si .00 



Earphone* 
3 leads B pnm qoot3 lew small to*ie 
speahi*n ai»rm cloth! ere 
5 for $100 



Mini (ohm Spanker 

AporrjK 2' i dinm Flcujnq 
lype lor radfdi make etc 
3 r r 12 00 



Cryttaii 

3S79545 MHZ S1 50 

10 00000 MHZ S5 00 

5 248800 MHZ JS 00 



AC Attepbrni 

Gooo tor cfoc*4 ntcad 
cnarqersjat? 110 VAC plug 
0-nr- er*l 

S 5 vdc 'Jr 20 mA St 00 

ie vac # tflOmA 12 so 

t? vac i& 750mA S3 00 



SoMd Slaie Buiceri 

small Pn/?er 450 H/ 06 OB sOunil 
output on 5-12 vdc at 10-30 mA T u 

c&mpaTipie 11 50 



Slug Tuned Cotfa 
SmaU 3 T6' Her Slugs turned ccm 
3(uma 10 for S1 00 



AC Oufief 

Pane* aAount with Lea dm 
•VI TOO 



FERHITE BEADS 



CAPACITORS 

TAhtTALUH 
Dipped Edo>v 

1.5 uF 25V 3^1,00 
I.BuF 25V 3/11. 00 
.22 uF 25V 3/S 1.00 



ALUHINUM 

Eieerfoi^ric 

UW uf '6V RadiAl IM 

aoUuf ?ov Anei I.M 

l^nf 16V .4 »*l S 4100 
irj^F TSV ftafli*. 10 tl 00 



DISH Ci PtAMIC 

oi lev d.»h an oo 

1 IBV 14'H 00 

001 IftV 2011 00 

lonpr 20 ii oo 

frr ieV ».ti oo 



TRANSISTORS 



?HM04Ne*|{>* 
?«tj*0t *iw» C -r- 
1smO!> *NP C*F 
'N**10**P^ C'F 

TMeaia *l t C •* 

IMHMOr 

iwrti np» Siitcofl 

JN117S IfHf NPN 
Po*»r Tib NPN 40W 
Po«*r Tib PHP 40W 

4*pf ioa jtrt*iw 
»o« r r pe T4I 

H0S trt» T*B 



u/t 



il-li oe 
ittnao 
»*■■ 00 

HI' AC 
4 1100 
11100 
I n 00 

n u 

1 woo 

HI W 

1/1 » 

IH 

HUM 



Socket! 

S Pin 10 $2 00 

14 Pin 10 1200 

16 Pin 10 S2.00 

24 Pin 4712.00 

26 Pm 4 $200 

40 Pm 3/S200 



Dlodai 

5 1 V Zfmer 20, $1.00 

iN9i4T v pe SO. $1.00 

1HV 2Amp a. $1.00 

100V lAmp 1$ $1 00 



DC-DC 

-5 *0£L input p*od 9 rtlC •*■ IOit-j 
-9 pot produtei i5*rJcSt3%n--i Si 25 



25K 30 Turn Trim Pw Si 00 
tK 20 Turn Trim Pot S SO 



Ceramic IF Fin*';,-* 

1 sOV.P S^ 



BW 



50 ea 



IE 



Trtmnw Cape 

Sprague 3-40 pi 

Stable Polypropylene 

so •■ 



Audio 
Prescaler 

Make high resolution audio 
measNf merits, great for musical 
instrument tuning, PL tones, etc 
Multiplies audio UP rn frequency 
selectable kIQ or m 100 gives 01 
HZ resolution with 1 sec gale 
hme' High sensitivity of 25 mv T 
meg input z and built-in filtering 
gives great performance Runs 
on 9V baitery all CMOS 
PS-2 kit $2995 

PS-2 wired $39.95 



600 MHz 

PRESCALEfl 



loj 



Extend the range of your 
counter to 600 MH? Works 
wilh all couniefs Less than 
150 mv sensitivity specify - 
10 or -TOO 

Wired, tested. PS-IB $59.95 
Kit PS- IB S44.95 



30 Will 2 mtr PWR AMP 

Simple Class C power amp features 8 times power gam i W m 
for 8 out. 2 W in for iSout 4W in for 30 out. Max Output of 35 W 
incredible value, complete with all parts less case and T-R relay 
PA- 1. 30 W pwr amp kit $22.95 

TR-1, RF sensed T-R relay kit 6.95 



MRF-23a transistor AS used in PA-1 
8-i0db gam 150 mru $1195 



RF actuated reiay senses RF 

(1W) and closes DPDT relay 

For RF sensed T-R relay 
TR-1 Kit 16.95 



Power Supply KM 

Complete triple regulated power 
supply provider variable Glolflvollsal 
200 ma and •SiMAmp E*ce1l«ni load 
reguiariDR good filtering and small 
stJe Less transforrners requires6 3V 
j i A ar>d 24 VCT 
Complete kit PS-3LT f«.M 



Cry •!■ I Microphone 

SmaJI 1 diameter V*" thicH 
crystal mike cartridge $.7$ 



Coax Connector 

Chassis mount 

BNC type $1.00 



25 AMP 
100V Bridge 
$1.50 each 

Mint-Bridge 50V 
1 AMP 

2 for $1.00 



Min> AG- 174 Coax 
10 ft. tor $1.00 



t VoM Better T Cilpa 
HtCe Quality Clips 1 *or f J W 

*t ft.jpb»r Gfommell to *or |1 00 



Aw oi chofcet diK caps tent *mtto*% 

•r j-i*.*ro*a tt>o4«f MiCA £*» etc 

im (mq \1Q0 pr- It 00 ig big \XB per 12, M 



Coontclon 

6 ptn r^pe ^oirj conracis tar 

mA-i0ttl car G^och module 

price .**♦#- 



Lada - your choice, please specify 

Mini Red Jumbo Red Nigh Intensity Red. Illuminator Red S/f 1 

Mini Yellow Jumbo Yellow Jumbo Green 6 1; 



Motorola MV 2309 30 P* Nomnai cap MJO PF - T^iaO% ra^ae 

MeawHeravtUi 



OP- AMP Special 
Bl-FET LF 1374 1 - Direct pm lor pin ^LVt-f patiole, bui 500,000 MEG 
mpul z super low 50 f Cfll O O^* " power drain 
SO for only f 9 00 ^ 10 tor M00 



78 MG 

79WG 

723 

309M 

7S05 



S1.25 

ISO 

II 1S 
11.00 



Reguittora 



761? 
TilS 

790S 
7912 

T 9^ 



11 00 
#100 
11.25 
II 25 

Il 25 



Shrink Tubing Nuba 

ettce precul pees of shrink* size i ■ V 

Shrinh (o ! t" Great Ipr tphces SO/f1 W 



Mini TO 92 Heal Smm 
Therminoy Brand 4 far fl.OC 

To??0 Heal Srnks 3 for 11 00 



Opto Isolators - 4N28 lype 
Opto Reflectors - Photo diode 



LED 



H 



S 50 
tVOOea 



Moeai Mn« 
Moee «TMctr precut m bngtn ci 7 Perfect 
rcn- M p*< eocfceQ 2tl rtrtpe for |1J> 



cot 

<slance vanes «rr» (igM 
3 meg 



2i0 onmi io 
3 for tl » 



♦'See L/sr Or* Advertisers on page t14 



73 Magazine * January, 1983 147 



FACIT 4355 SERIAL PACE PRINTER 

The Facit 4555 alphanumerical serial printer is complete, Equipped with RS232C Interface, 
printing mechanism, control electronics, drive electronics, power supply and character genera- 
tor* The adaptation electronics can be modified in four versions :Bic-parallel data transfer, 
CC1TT (EIA, R5232C) for bit-serial data transfer and the current loop (TTY) interface also for 
bit serial data transfer. The Facit 4555 prints on ordinary paper and le adjustable for dif- 
ferent paper widths and formats, 9.5" paper width with 66 lines per pa&e or DIH A4 with 70 

lines per page, 

SPECIFICATIONS 



Print speed 

Printing mode 

Max, tf of eh/ line 

Matrix 

Char. Size Height 

Char. Size Width 



up to 60ch*fl. 

Incremental* 

80 alt. 132, 

7X5 dot matrix* 

2.700/1/8" 

1.3*n/0.05" I32ch/line 

2.1ram/Q.083" 80ch/line 



Char, spacing 

Char . Code 
Char, Bet 

Feed mechanism 



2. 54mm/ 1/10" 80ch/line 
1.55mm/0.06" I32ch/line 
ECMA-6 7-bit coded char, set 
63 Char* various national 
versions. 
Sprocket feed. 



THESE UNITS WERE PULLED OUT OF SERVICE IN GOOD WORKING CONDITION. WE CHECK EACH UNIT ON A 
RADIO SHACK TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER, 




PRINTER ONLY $129.99 

Printer with linecord, box of 
paper, inter-connect cable for 
TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER. 

$149.99 



GENEVA CALCULATOR wATCH 



This attractive watch has the following modes 

Normal Time Setting, 

Calendar Setting, 

Daily Alarm Time Setting, 

Weekly Alarm Time Setting, 

Chronograph, 

Calculator. 



. ; 









Featured in Black Plastic 



$24.99 



or Featured in Stainless Steel 



529.99 



SILICON DIODES 

u 

HR7S1 
MRS10 
SEP 170 
IN 3209 
BYX2 1/200 
IN 2 1 38A 
DS85-04C 
IN 32 69 
275241 
7-5754 
RCO-15 
SMFR20K 
1N414S 



lOOvdc 

lOOOvdc 

lOOOvdc 

lOOvdc 

200vdc 

600vdc 

400vdc 

600vdc 

30Gvdc 

300vdc 

1 5KVDC 

20KVDC 

signal 



6 Amps 

3 Amps 

2 Amps 

ISAnps 

25Amps 

60Amps 

80Amps 

1 ftOAmps 

250Amps 

400Amps 

20ma. 

20ma. 



10/55.00 

l0/$3.75 

20/$2,0O 

$2.00 

$2.00 

$5.00 

$10.00 

$15.00 

$20,00 

$30.00 

S3. 00 

$4,00 

30/$ 1.00 



100/538-00 
100/ $24. 00 
100/$ 15- 00 
10/ $15.00 
10/ $15.00 
10/ $40.00 
10/ $80.00 
10/$I20.00 
10/SI75.0Q 
l0/$25O.O0 
10/ $20-00 
10/ $30.00 
100/ $3.00 



FEED THRU SOLDER RF CAFACTORS 

470pf +-20Z 

5/$ 1. 00 or 100/515.00 or 
1000/$ 100. 00 

iOOOpf/.OOluf +-10£ 

4/$ 1,00 or !00/$2Q-00 or 
1000/$ 150, 00 



FA1RCH1LD 4U6 lfeK PYKAMIC RAMS 200tts. Fart # 16K75 
25 For $25.00 or 100 For $90.00 or 1000 For $750*00 



HEWLETT PACKARD MICROWAVE DIODES 



E PROMS 
2708 1024x1 
2716 2048x8 
27L32/25L32 



$2.00 each 
$4.00 each 
$10,00 each 



1115711 

1N5712 
1N6263 
5082-2835 
5082-^2805 



(5082-2800) 
(5082-2810) 
(HSCH-1001) 

Quad Matched 



Schottky Barrier Diodes 
n !■ ■■ 



*i 



Fl 



II 



It 



II 



u 



per set 



$1.00 or 10 for $ 8.50 

$1.50 or 10 for $10.00 

$ .75 or 10 for $ 5.00 

$1.50 or 10 for $10,00 

$5.00 or 10 for $40,00 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



JVl^z electronic* 



148 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



"MIXERS" 



WATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M6 Double Balanced Mixer 

LO and RF 0.2 to 300MHz 
Conversion Loss (SSB) 



Noise Figure (SSB) 
Conversion Compression 



IF DC to 300MHz 
6.5dB Max. 1 to 50MHz 
8.5dB Max. .2 to 300MHz 
same as above 
8.5dB Max. 50 to 300MHz 
.3dB Typ. 



$21.00 

WITH DATA SHEET 



NEC (NIPPON ELECTRIC CO. LTD. NE57835/2SC2150 Microwave Transistor 

NF Min F=2GHz dB 2.4 Typ. MAG F=2GHz dB 12 Typ. $5.30 

F=3GHz dB 3.4 Typ. F=3GHz dB 9 Typ. 

F=4GHz dB 4.3 Typ. F=4GHz dB 6.5 Typ. 

Ft Gain Bandwidth Product at Vce=8v, Ic=10ma. GHz 4 Min. 6 Typ. 
Vcbo 25v Vceo llv Vebo 3v Ic 50ma. Pt. 250mw 

UNELCO RF Power and Linear Airplifier Capacitors 

These are the famous capacitors used by all the RF Power and Linear Amplifier 
nenuf acturers , and described in the RF Data Book. 



5pf 

5.1pf 

6.8pf 

7pf 

8.2pf 



lOpf 
12pf 
13pf 

lApf 
15pf 



18pf 
22pf 



27pf 
27.5pf 



30pf 
32pf 

33pf 
34pf 
40pf 



43pf 
51pf 
60pf 
80pf 
82pf 



lOOpf 
llOpf 
120pf 
130pf 
140pf 



200pf 1 to 
220pf 11 to 
470pf 51 up 
50Opf 
lOOOpf 



lOpcs 

5 Opes 

pes 



$1.00 ea 
$ ,90 ea 
$ .80 ea 



NIPPON ELECTRIC COMPANY TUNNEL DIODES 



Peak Pt. Current ma. I 

Valley Pt. Current ma. Iv 

Peak Pt. Voltage mv. Vp 
Projected Peak Pt. Voltage mv. Vpp 

Series Res. Ohms rS 

Terminal Cap. pf. Ct 

Valley Pt. Voltage mv. VV 



Vf=Ip 



MODEL 1S2199 

9tnin. lOTyp. Umax. 

1.2Typ. l.Smax. 

95Typ. 120max. 

480min. 550Typ. 630max. 

2.5Typ. 4max. 

1.7Typ. 2max. 

370Typ. 



1S2200 J 

9min. lOTyp. Umax. 

1.2Typ. 1.5max. 

75Typ. 90max. 

440min. 520Typ. 600max 

2Typ. 3max. 

5Typ. 8max. 

350Typ. 



FAIRCHILD / DIIMONT Oscilloscope Probes Model 4290B 

Input Impedance 10 meg., Input Capacity 6.5 to 12pf., Division Ration (Volts/Div Factor) 

10:1, Cable Length 4Ft. , Frequency Range Over 100MHz. 

These Probes will work on all Tektronix, Hewlett Packard, and other Oscilloscopes. 

PRICE $45.00 



MOTOROLA RF DATA BOOK 



Lists all Motorola RF Transistors / RF Power Amplifiers, Varactor Diodes and much much 
more. 



PRICE $7.50 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



ofll^tljL electronics 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • January. 1983 140 






RF TRANSISTORS, MICROWAVE DIODES 



PART 



PRICE 



PART 



PRICE 



PART 



PRICE 



1S2I99 


$ 7,50 


2N6083 


$ 


13.25 


CA2612 (TRW) 


$ 25.00 


1S2200 


7.50 


2 N 6084 




L5.00 


CA2674 (TRW) 


25,00 


2N1561 


25.00 


2ft 609 4 /H9622 


11.00 


CA2881-1(TRW) 


25-00 


2N1562 


25.00 


2N6095 /M9623 


12.00 


CA4101 (TRW) 


25-00 


2N2857 


1.55 


2N6096 /M9624 


15.50 


CA4201 (TRW) 


25.00 


2N2857JAN 


2.55 


2N6097 




17.25 


CA4600 (TRW) 


25.00 


2N2876 


11.00 


2N6136 




21.85 


CD 1889 


20.00 


2N2947 


18.35 


2N6166 




40.25 


CD2545 


20.00 


2N2948 


15.50 


2N6201 




50,00 


CMD514AB 


20.00 


2N2949 


3,90 


2N6459 




18 . 00 


D4959 


10.00 


2N2950 


4.60 


2N6603 




12.00 


D4987M 


20.00 


2N3375 


8.00 


2N6680 




80.00 


D5147D 


10.00 


2N3553 


1.57 


2SC756A 




7.50 


D5506 


10.00 


2N3632 


13.80 


2SC78I 




2.80 


D 582 7 AM 


20.00 


2N3818 


5.00 


2SC1018 




1.00 


DMB6022 


30-00 


2N3866 


1.30 


2SC1042 




12,00 


DMS-2A-25Q 


40.00 


2N3924 


3.35 


2SC1070 




2.50 


HEP 7 6 


4-95 


2N3927 


17,75 


2SC1239 




2.50 


HEPS 3002 


11.30 


2N3950 


25.00 


2SC1251 




12.00 


HEPS 3003 


30.00 


2N4072 


1.80 


2SCI306 




2.90 


HEPS 3005 


10.00 


2N4127 


2 1 . 00 


2SC13Q7 




5.50 


HEPS 3006 


19.90 


2N4427 


1 . 30 


2SC1760 




1.50 


HEPS3O07 


25,00 


2N4428 


1.85 


2SC1970 




2.50 


HEPS 30 10 


11.34 


2N4957 


3.45 


2SC2166 




5.50 


HTEF2204 H-P- 


112-00 


2N4958 


2.90 


8B1087 


CM. A*) 


25.00 


5082-0112 H.P. 


14.20 


2N4959 


2.30 


A50-12 




20.00 


5082-0253 H-P. 


105-00 


2N5090 


13,90 


A283B 




5.00 


5082-0320 H.P. 


58-00 


2N5108 


4.00 


ALD4200N (AVANTEK) 


395.00 


5082-0386 H.P. 


POR 


2N5109 


1.70 


AM123 




97.35 


5082-0401 H.P. 


POR 


2N5160 


3.45 


AM688 




100.00 


5082-0438 H.P. 


POR 


2K5177 


21.62 


BB105B 




.52 


5082-1028 H.P. 


POR 


2N5179 


LOO 


BD4/4JFBD4 (G.E.) 


10,00 


5082-2711 H,P. 


23.15 


2N5583 


4.00 


BFQ85 




1 . 50 


5082-3080 H.P. 


2,00 


2N5589 


8.65 


BFR90 




1.30 


5082-3188 H.P. 


1.00 


2N5590 


10.35 


BFR91 




1.65 


5082-6459 H.P. 


POR 


2N5591 


13,80 


BFW92 




1.50 


5082-8323 H-P- 


POR 


2N5635 


10.95 


BFX89 




1.00 


35826E H.P. 


POR 


2N5637 


15.50 


BFY90 




1.00 


35831E H.P. 


29.99 


2N5641 


9.20 


BGY54 




25,00 


35853E H.P. 


71,50 


2N5642 


10.95 


BGY55 




25.00 


35854E H.P. 


75.00 


2N5643 


15,50 


BGY74 




25.00 


HPA0241 H.P. 


75.60 


2N5645 


13.80 


BGY75 




25.00 


HXTR3101 H.P. 


7,00 


2N5646 


20.70 


BL161 




10.00 


HXTR3102 H.P, 


8.75 


2N5691 


18.00 


BLX67 




11.00 


HXTR6101/2N66I7 


H,P, 55.00 


2N5764 


27-00 


BLY568CF 


25.00 


HXTR6104 H.P. 


68.00 


2N5836 


5.45 


ELY 87 




13.00 


HXTR6105 H.P. 


31-00 


2N5842 


8.00 


BLY88 




14.00 


HXTR6106 H.P. 


33.00 


2N5849 


20.00 


BLY89 




15.00 


QSCH1995 H.P- 


POR 


2N5913 


3,25 


BLY90 




20.00 


J02000 TRW 


10.00 


2N5922 


10.00 


BLY351 




10.00 


JO 2 001 TRW 


25-00 


2N5923 


25.00 


C4005 




20.00 


J04045 TRW 


25.00 


2N5941 


23.00 


CA402 


(TRW) 


25.00 


K3A 


10.00 


2N5942 


40.00 


CA405 


(TRW) 


25.00 


MA4 50A 


10.00 


2N5944 


9.20 


CA612B 


(TRW) 


25.00 


MA41487 


POR 


2K5945 


11.50 


CA2100 


(TRW) 


25.00 


MA41765 


POR 


2N5946 


19.00 


C A2 1 1 3 


(TRW) 


25.00 


MA43589 


POR 


2N6Q80 


9.20 


CA2200 


(TRW) 


25,00 


MA43636 


POR 


2N6081 


10.35 


CA2213 


(TRW) 


25.00 


MA4 7044 


POR 


2N6082 


11.50 


CA2418 


(TRW) 


25.00 


MA4 7651 


25. 50 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 

(fiVf 6 Hz elect roi\ic$ 



1 



150 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



GaAs, TUNNEL DIODES, ETC. 



1 



PART 



PRICE 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



PART 



PRICE 



PART 



PRICE 



MA47I00 


$ 3.05 


MRF503 


$ 6.00 


PT4186B 


$ POR 


MA47202 


30. 80 


MRF504 


7.00 


PT4209 


POR 


MA47771 


POR 


MRF509 


5.00 


PT4209C 


POR 


MA47852 


POR 


MRF511 


8.65 


PT4566 


POR 


MA49558 


FOR 


MRF605 


20.00 


PT4570 


POR 


MB4021 


POR 


MRF629 


3-47 


PT4571 


POR 


MBD101 


1.00 


MRF644 


23-00 


PT4571A 


POR 


MD0513 


POR 


MRF816 


15-00 


PT4577 


POR 


MHW1171 


42.50 


MRF823 


20-00 


PT4590 


POR 


MHW1182 


48.60 


MRF901 


3.00 


PT4612 


POR 


MHW4171 


49.35 


MRF8004 


2.10 


PT4628 


POR 


MHW4172 


51.90 


MS261F 


POR 


PT4640 


POR 


MHW4342 


68.75 


MT4150 Fair. 


POR 


PT4642 


POR 


MLP102 


25.00 


MT5126 Fair. 


POR 


PT5632 


POR 


MM1500 


32.32 


MT5481 Fair, 


POR 


PT5749 


POR 


MM1550 


POR 


MT5482 Fair. 


POR 


PT6612 


FOR 


MM1552 


50.00 


MT5483 Fair. 


POR 


PT6626 


POR 


MM1553 


50.00 


MT5596 Fair. 


POR 


PT6709 


POR 


MM1614 


10.00 


MT5764 Fair. 


POR 


PT6720 


FOR 


MM2608 


5.00 


MT8762 Fair. 


POR 


PT8510 


POR 


MM3375A 


11-50 


MV109 


.77 


PT8524 


POR 


MM4429 


10*00 


HV1401 


8.75 


PT8609 


POR 


MM8000 


1.15 


MV1624 


1.42 


PT8633 


POR 


MM8006 


2,30 


MV1805 


15.00 


PT8639 


POR 


M0277L 


POR 


MV1808 


10.00 


PT8659 


POR 


M0283L 


POR 


MV1817B 


10.00 


PTS679 


POR 


M03757 


POR 


MV1863B 


10.00 


PT8708 


POR 


MP102 


POR 


MV1864A 


10.00 


PT8709 


POR 


MPN3202 


10.00 


MV1864B 


10.00 


PT872 7 


POR 


MPN3401 


.52 


MV1864D 


10.00 


PT8731 


POR 


MPN3412 


1.00 


MV1868D 


10.00 


PT8742 


POR 


MPSU31 


1.01 


MV2101 


.90 


PT8787 


POR 


MRA2023-1.5 TRW 


42.50 


MV2111 


-90 


PT9790 


41.70 


MRF212/208 


16.10 


MV2115 


1.55 


PT31962 


POR 


MRF223 


13.25 


MV2201 


.53 


PT31963 


FOR 


MRF224 


15-50 


MV2203 


.53 


PT31983 


POR 


MRF237 


3.15 


MV2209 


2.00 


PTX6680 


FOR 


KRF238 


12 . 65 


MV2215 


2.00 


RAY- 3 


24.99 


MRF243 


25.00 


MWA110 


7.45 


40081 


POR 


MRF245 


34.50 


MWA120 


7.80 


40281 


FOR 


MRF247 


34.50 


MWA130 


8.25 


40282 


FOR 


MRF304 


43.45 


MWA210 


7.80 


40290 


POR 


MRF315 


23.00 


MWA220 


8.25 


RF110 


25.00 


MRF420 


20.00 


MWA230 


8.65 


SCA3522 


POR 


MRF421 


36.80 


MWA310 


8.25 


SCA3523 


FOR 


MRF422 


41.40 


MWA320 


8.65 


SD1065 


FOR 


MRF427 


16.10 


MWA330 


9.50 


SS43 


POR 


KRF428 


46.00 


NEC57835 


5.30 


TP1014 


POR 


MRF450/A 


13,80 


ON382 


5.00 


TP1028 


POR 


MRF453/A 


17.25 


PFT515-20-3 


POR 


TRW- 3 


POR 


KRF454/A 


19-90 


PRT8637 


POR 


UT0504 Avantek 


70.00 


MRF455/A 


16.00 


PSCQ2-160 


POR 


UT0511 Avail tek 


75 . 00 


MRF458 


19-90 


PT3190 


POR 


V15 


4-00 


MRF463 


25.00 


PT3194 


POR 


V33B 


4.00 


MRF472 


1.00 


PT3195 


POR 


V100B 


4.00 


MRF475 


2.90 


PT3537 


POR 


VAB801EC 


25.00 


MRF477 


11.50 


PT4166E 


POR 


VAB804EC 


25.00 


MRF502 


1.04 


PT4176D 


POR 


VAS21AA20 


25.00 



gJH^IJz electroiycs 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine * January, 1983 151 



COAXIAL RELAY £ KES SPDT 



Electronic Specialty Co, /Raven Electronic* 
Part # 25N2B part # SH-01 

26Vdc Type N Connector, DC to I GHz. 



FSN 5985-556-9683 



$49.00 





Amphenol 

Fart # 316-10102-8 

USVac Type BNC DC to 3 GHz 



$29,99 



FXR 

Part # 30IMU82 

UGVac Type SHC DC to k GHz, 

FSN 5985*543-1225 

$39. n 




FXR 

Part # 300-11173 
120Vac Type BNC Same 
FSH 5985-543-1850 

$39.99 








BNC To Banana Plug Coax Cable RG-58 36 inch or BNC Co H Coax Cable RG-58 36 inch. 



$7.99 or 2 For $13.99 or 10 For $50.00 



$8.99 or 2 For $15,99 or 10 For $60.00 





sm.ij s;.\:l BELAYS 

P6B Model ECT1DB72 
PRICE EACH $5.00 

Dlglsig, Inc* Model ECS-215 
PRICE EACH $7.50 



Grigsby/Sarton Itodel GB7400 
PRICE EACH $7.50 



5vdc turn on. 



5vdc turn on 



5vdc turn on 



120vac contact at Tamps or 20amps on a 
lQ"x l(f*U A2** aluminum, tie-atsink with 
silicon grease* 

240vac contact I4amps or AOamps on a 
ID"* lO^x -124 aluminum. Heat sink with 
silicon grease. 



240vac contact at 1 Samps or 40amps on a 
10"x 10"x .124 aluminum. Heatsink with 
silicon grease. 

NOTE: *** Items may be substituted with other brands or equivalent model numbers. *** 



m^ 



electronic* 



Toll FrM Number 
800-528-0180 
{For order* onfy) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



i 



152 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



HECALL FHOHE MEMORY TELEPHONE WITH 24 NUMBER AUTO DIALER 

The Recall Phone Telephone employs the latest state of art 
communications technology . It is a combination telephone 
and automatic dialer that uses premium-quality, solid-state 
circuitry to assure high-reliability performance in personal 
or business applications* §49.99 




ARON ALPHA RAPID BONDISG GLUE 

Super Glue ICE-486 high strength 
rapid bonding adhesive. Alpha 
Cyanoacrylate- Set-Time 20 to 40 
sec, ,Ch7fi,02. (20gm.) 

$2.00 




TOUCH TONE PAD 

This pad contains all the electronics to 
produce standard touch- tone tones, New 
with data. 




$9,99 or 10/$89.99 



MITSUMI UHF/VHF VARACTOR TUNER MODEL UVElA 

Perfect for those unscrambler projects. 
Rev with data. 




$19,99 or 10/$149.99 



INTEGRATED CIRCUIT. 



MC1372P 

MC13S8P 

MC1350P 

MCI330A1P 

MC1310P 

MC1496P 

LM565N 

LM380N14 

LM1889N 

NE564N 

NE561N 



Color TV Video Modulator Circuit. 

IF Amp. t Limlter,'FM Detector .Audio Driver, Electronic Attenuator- 

IF Amplifier 

Low Level Video Detector 

FM Stereo Demodulator 

Balanced Modulator/Demodulator 

Phase Locked Loop 

2Watt Audio Power Amplifier 

TV Video Modulator 

Phase Locked Loop 

Phase Locked Loop 



1 to 10 

i 4.42 

5-00 

1-50 

1.50 

4.29 

1.50 

2.50 

1,56 

5-00 
10-00 
10. 00 



liup 

$2.95 
4.00 
1.25 
1.15 
3.30 
1.25 
2.00 
1.25 
A -00 
8.00 
8-00 



FERRANTI ELECTRONICS AH RADIO RECEIVER MODEL ZN414 INTEGRATED CIRCUIT. 







Features: 

1.2 to 1.6 volt operating range. , Less than 0,5ma current consumption. 15QKHz to 3MHz 
Frequency range. t Easy to assemble , no alignment necessary. Effective and variable AGC action,, 
¥111 drive an earphone direct. Excellent audio quality. .Typical power gain of 72dB. ,T0-18 
package. With data. 52. 99 or 10 For $24.99 



HI CAD RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES 

AA Battery Pack of 6 These are Factory 
New. $5.00 

SUB C Pack of 10 2. 5Anp/Hr. $10.00 

Gates Rechargeable Battery Packs 



12vdc at 2.5Amp/Hr. 
12vdc at 5Amp/Hr. 



511.99 
$15.99 



\&\K&^&*&*&\ K&*K&K&V*&**&>1&^ \&*&\ 



Holiday 
greetings! 






^i G f[x elect roi\ic$ 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • January, 1983 153 



"SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS" 




EIMAC TUBE SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS 



SK110 

SK3QOA 

SK4Q0 

SK406 

SK416 

5K50Q 

SK600 

SK602 

SK606 

5K6G7 

SK610 

SK620 

SK626 

SK630 

SK636B 

SK640 

SX646 

SK700 

SK711A 

SKMQ 

SK7 70 

SK800A 

SK806 

SK810 

SK900 

SK906 

SKH20 

SKH90 



Socket 

Socket For 4CX5000A.R, J, 4CX1 0,0000, 4CX15,000A,J 

Socket For ^laSApaSOA.AOOA.AOOCAPRllSA^OOApi-SOOA, 5-500A 

Chimney For A*250A,400A # 400C,4FR400A 

Chimney For 3*400Z 

Socket For 4-1000A/4PRIOOOA/B 

Socket For 4CX250B,BC,FG,R,4CX350A,F,FJ 

Socket For 4CX250B 1 BC t FG t R r 4CX350A,F»FJ 

Chimney For 4CX25GB ( BC,FG > R,4CX35GA t F i FJ 

Socket For 4CX6Q0J.JA 

Socket For 4CX600J.JA 

Socket For 4CX6Q0J,JA 

Chimney For 4CX600J t JA 

Socket For 4CX600J,JA 

Chimney For 4CX600J.JA 

Socket For 4CX600J t JA 

Chimney For 4CXG0GJ,JA 

Socket For 4CX30OA,Y,4CXl25C t F 

Socket For 4CX300A,Y,4CX125C,F 

Socket For 4CX300A i Y,4CX125C l F 

Socket For 4CX300A,Y T 4CXI 25C,F 

Socket For 4CX10OGA f 4CX150QB 

Chimney For 4CX1000A,4CX1 500B 

Socket For 4CX10OOA,4CXl500B 

Socket For 4X500A 

Chimney For 4X500A 

Socket For 5CX3000A 

Socket For 4CV8000A 



SPOR 
5520,00 
260.00 
74.00 
36.00 
390.00 
51 .00 
73,00 
11.00 
60,00 
60.00 
66.00 
10.00 
66,00 
34.00 
36.00 
7 1 . 00 
225.00 
225.00 
86,00 
86.00 
225.00 
40*00 
225.00 
300*00 
57*00 
650.00 
585.00 



JOHNSON TUBE SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS 



124-1 11/SK606 
L22-0275-0GL 
124-0113-00 
124^116/SK630A 
124-1 15-2/SK620A 



Chimney For 4CX250B.HC ,FG.R, 4CX350A,F,FJ 

Socket For 3-50GZ, 4-125A, 250A, 400A, 4-500A. 5-500A 

Capacitor Ring 

Socket For 4CX25QB,BC t FG,R> /4CX350A,F,FJ 

Socket For 4CX25QB,BC t FG,R, /4CX350A ( F f FJ 

813 Tube Socket 



$ 10,00 
(pair) 15.00 
15.00 
55-00 
55,00 
20.00 



CHIP CAPACITORS 

.8pf 

Ipf 

l.lpf 

1.4pf 

1.5pf 

1.8pf 

2.7pf 
3,3pf 
3,6pf 
3.9pf 
4.7pf 
5.6pf 
6.8pf 
B.2pf 



PRICES: 



I to 10 * 

II to 50 ■ 
51 to 100 



lOpf 
12pf 
15pf 

18pf 
20pf 
22pf 
24pf 
27pf 
33pf 
39pf 
47 pf 
51pf 
56pf 
68pf 
82pf 

.99* 
,90* 

.eoe 



OOpf* 

lOpf 

20pf 

30pf 

SOpf 

60pf 

SOpf 

200pf 

220pf* 

24 Opt 

Z70pf 

300pf 

330pf 

360pf 

390pf 



430pf 

470pf 

SlOpf 

560pf 

620pf 

680pf 

820pf 

lOOOpf/.OOLuf* 

1800pf/.00lSuf 

2700pf/.0027uf 

lO.OOOpf/.Oluf 

12,00Opf/.01Zlif 

lB.ODGpf/.OiSuf 

18,O00pf/,0I8uf 



101 to 1000 
1001 & UP 



60€ * IS A SPECIAL PRICE: 10 for $7.50 
35* 100 for $65,00 

1000 for S3 50. DO 



WATK1NS JOHNSON WJ-V9Q7 : Voltage Controlled Microwave Oscillator $110.00 

Frequency range 3,6 to 4.ZGHz, Power ouput, Min. lQdBm typical, 8dBm Guaranteed, 
Spurious output suppression Harmonic (nf h min. 20dB typical, In-Band Non-Harmonic, miru 
60dB typical. Residual FM S pk to pk, Max. 5KHz, pushing factor, Max. 8KHz/V, Pulling figure 
{L5:l VSWft), Max. 60WHz> Tuning voltage range +1 to +15VQU5, Tuning current, Ha*. -0.1mA, 
modulation sensitivity range, Max. 120 to 30MHz/V, Input capacitance, Max. lOOpf, Oscillator 
Bias +15 +-0.05 volts # 55mA, Kax. 

Toll Free Number 
800-5284180 
(For orders only) 



TUBE CAPS (Place) 


$11.00 


HR1, A 


HR2,3, 6 A 7 


13,00 


HR5, 8 


L4.00 


HR9 


17.00 


HR10 


20.00 



(flVl^z elect rorycfc 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



154 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



1 



TUBES 



TYPE 

2E26 
2K28 
2X1000A 
3B22 

3B28/866A 

3-500Z 

3-1000Z 

3CX1000A/8283 

3CX1500A7/887 

3X2500A3 

3CX3000A7 

4-65A/8165 

4-125A/4D21 

4-250A/5D22 

4-400A/8432 

4-400C/6775 

4-1000A/8166 

4B32 

4E27A/5-125B 

4CS250R 

4X15OA/7034 

4X1 50D/ 7035 

4X150G/8172 

4X2 SOB 

4CX250B/7203 

4CX250F/G/8621 

4CX250K/8245 

4CX250R/7580W 

4CX300A/8167 

4CX350A/8321 

4CX350F/J/8904 

4X5 OOA 

4CX600J/8809 

4CW800P 

4CX1000A/8168 

4CX1500B/8660 

4CX5000A/8170 

4CX10000D/8171 

4CX15000A/8281 

4PR60A 

4PR60B/8252 

4PR400A/8188 

5CX1500A 

6BK4C 

6DQ5 

6FW5 

6GE5 

6GJ5 

6HS5 

6JB5/6HE5 

6JB6A 



PRICE 



I 5 

100 

300 

19 

7 

102 

400 

428 

533 

200 

490 

45 

58 

75 

90 

95 

300 

22 

155 

146 

30 

40 

100 

30 

45 

55 

100 

69 

140 

83 

95 

282 

607 

625 

340 

397 

932 

990 

1260 

100 

175 

192 

569 



69 
00 
00 
75 
50 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



6 
5 
6 
6 
6 

6 

6.00 
6.00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



TYPE 

KT88 

DX362 

DX415 

572B/T160L 

592/3-200A3 

807 

811 

81 1A 

812A 

813 

829B 

832A 

4624 

4662 

4665 

5675/A 

5721 

5768 

5836 

5837 

5861/EC55 

587 6A 

5881/6L6W 

5893 

5894/A 

5894/B 

5946 

6080 

6083/AX9909 

6098/6AK6 

6115/A 

6146 

6146A 

6146B/8298A 

6146W 

6156 

6159 

6161 

6291 

6293 

6360 

6524 

6550 

6JM6 
6JN6 
6JS6B 
6KG6/EL505 

6KM6 
6KK6 
6LF6 
6LQ6 (GE) 



PRICE 



TYPE 



PRICE 



20, 00 


6562/6974A 


$ 50. 00 


50.00 


6832 


22.00 


50.00 


6883/8032A/8552 


7.00 


49.00 


6897 


110.00 


144.00 


6907A 


75.00 


7.50 


6939 


15.00 


10.00 


7094 


125.00 


15.00 


7117 


17.00 


35. 00 


7211 


60.00 


50.00 


7289/3CX100A5 


34.00 


38.00 


7360 


11.00 


28.00 


7377 


67.00 


310.00 


7408 


4.00 


80.00 


7650 


250.00 


585.00 


7695 


8.00 


25.00 


7843 


58.00 


200.00 


7854 


83.00 


85.00 


7868 


5.00 


100.00 


7894 


12.00 


100.00 


8072 


65.00 


110.00 


8117A 


130.00 


25.00 


8121 


60.00 


6.00 


8122 


100.00 


45.00 


8236 


30.00 


50.00 


8295/PL172 


506.00 


60.00 


8462 


100.00 


258.00 


8505A 


73.50 


10.00 


8533W 


92.00 


89.00 


8560/A 


65.00 


14.00 


8560AS 


90.00 


110.00 


8608 


34.00 


7.00 


8637 


38.00 


7.50 


8643 


100.00 


8.50 


8647 


123.00 


14.00 


8737/5894B 


60.00 


66.00 


8873 


260.00 


15.00 


8874 


260.00 


233.00 


8875 


260.00 


125.00 


8877 


533.00 


12.00 


8908 


12.00 


5.00 


8930/6512 


71.00 


53.00 


8950 


12.00 


10.00 






6.00 


6LQ6 (Sylvania) 


7.50 


6.00 


6LU8 


6.00 


6.00 


6LX6 


6.00 


6.00 


6ME6 


6.00 


6.00 


12BY7A 


4.00 


6.00 


12JB6A 


6.00 


6.00 


6KD6 


6.00 


6.00 


6JT6A 


6.00 




6KD6 


6.00 


! I ! I f 1 1 1 1 1 ! ! ! ! ! 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 I ! 1 1 1 ! 1 


!!!!!!!!!! 


!!!!!!!!!!!! 


!!!!l!!!!t!!!!!!!! 


!!!!!!!!!! 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



JM g I\x elect roi\ic$ 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine * January, 1983 155 



"TVRO BOARD LIST" 

70 KH2 IF BOARD ; This circuit provide* about 43dB gain with 50 oha Input and output Impedance, 
It is designed to drive the Demodulator. The cm -board bypass filter can be tuned to band- 
widths between 20 and 35 MHz with a passband ripple of less than h dB, Hybrid IC's are used 
for the gala stages, 

SINGLE AUDIO BOARD : This circuit recovers the audio signals fro* the 6.3 HHt frequency * The 
Miller 9051 coils are tuned to pass the 6,8MB* subcarrier and the 9052 coil tunes for recovery 
of the audio. 

DUAL AUDIO BOARD : Duplicate of the single audio but also covera the 6.2 range. 

DC CONTROL BOARD: Ho description. 



DUAL AUDIO BOARD 



PRICE EACH 



Printed Circuit Board 


% 25.00 


2 3pf sm 




I. 00 


2 12pf sm 




J. 00 


2 50pf sm 




1.00 


2 68 pf sm 




1.00 


4 91pf sm 




1.00 


5 .QOlmfd 




.35 


6 .Dimfd 




t J-i 


2 .G47mfd 




,35 


1 .47mfd 25vdc 




.35 


2 Lmfd lOvdc 




.59 


4 4.7nfd 35vdc 




♦ 59 


1 470mfd Z5vdc 




1.29 


2 220K l/4w 




as 


2 15QK i/4w 




as 


2 6,8K l/4u 




as 


2 3.3K l/4w 




as 


2 2.2K l/4w 




AS 


4 IK l/4w 




as 


2 10 oha 1/Au 




as 


I 50* pots 




1,00 


1 5K pot 




1.00 


2 CA3065 




2.16 


1 LM3B0 




1,56 


1 7812 Voltage 


Reg. 


ia7 


5 2N2222 




.50 


4 Miller 9051 




5.99 


2 Miller 9052 




5.99 


TOTAL KIT PRICE 




97.62 


DC CONTROL BOARD 






Printed Circuit Board 


15.00 


2 47Dmfd 25vdc 




1.29 


2 4.7mfd 25vdc 




.59 


1 Imeg l/4u 




as 



3 10K l/4w 

1 3.3K I/4w 

3 2.2K l/4w 

1 IK l/4w 

2 5K 10 turn trimpot 

4 10K 10 turn trimpot 

1 1QK 10 turn with dial 

1 7815 Voltage Reg. 

1 LM324 

1 5 pole rotary switch 

1 SPOT switch 

1 DPDT ewich 

1 0-lma meter 

1 18 to 24vdc at 1 amp 
power supply 

TOTAL KIT PRICE 



.15 

as 
as 

as 

1.00 

i. 00 

10.00 

1. 17 
2.50 
2.50 

1.00 
1.00 
5.00 

24.99 
74.27 



DEMODULATOR BOARD 



PRICE EACH 



Printed Circuit Board 


$ 40.00 


1 lmfd 35vdc 




.59 


13 .Olmfd 50vdc 


disc 


,35 


I 470mfd 25vdc 




1,29 


Z lOOmfd 16vdc 




.69 


2 22mfd 35vdc 




.59 


3 4.?njfd 35vdc 




.59 


1 4 300pf sm 




2,00 


1 330pf am 




1,00 


1 lOOpf sm 




1*00 


i 9lpf sm 




1.00 


2 3pf sm 




1.00 


1 2 to Spf ceramic trimmer 


1.00 


1 lOOuh choke 




1.50 


1 4,7uh choke 




1 . 50 


I 2.7uh choke 




1.50 



10OK l/4w 
51 ohm I/4w 
2 7K l/4w 
10K l/4w 
H«2K l/4w 
4.7K l/4w 
2.2K l/4w 
l.ZK l/4w 
IK l/4w 
560 ohm l/4w 
470 ohra l/4w 
390 ohm l/4w 



as 
as 
as 

.15 
.15 

. IS 

as 

.15 

as 
as 
as 

.15 



I 300 ohm l/4w 




.15 


1 270 ohm l/4w 




as 


I 150 oha l/4w 




AS 


1 41 ohm l/4w 




as 


I I OK pot 




l. 00 


1 NE592/LM733N 




2.50 


1 SE564 




5,00 


1 HWA120 (Motorola) 




7.BO 


1 7812 Voltage teg. 




\A7 


1 7815 Voltage Reg. 




LI7 


3 232222 




.50 


2 IM34/3& 




.50 


1 HPSO82-2B0O 




2.20 


1 5 to 7 volt Zenner 




1. 00 


TOTAL KIT PRICE 




92.25 


COMPLETE KIT WITH DUAL 


AUDIO 


$923.23 


COMPLETE KIT WITH SINGLE AUDIO 


880. 77 



LESS 101 OH ALL COMPLETE KIT ORDERS 

BOARDS AND PARTS HAY BE PURCHASED SEPARATELY 
AT THE PRICES LISTED ABOVE. 

ALL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT 
NOTICE I I I 1 11 r II 1 II I I ! 1 1 ! I I I I 1 ! 1 1 M I I ! M I 



TVRO BOARD DESCRIPTION AND PARTS LIST 

DUAL CONVERSION BOARD : This board provides conversion from the 3.7-4.2 band first to 900 MHz 
where gain and bandpass filtering are provided and, second, to 70 MHz, The board contains 
both local oscillators, one fixed and the other variable, and the second mixer. Construction 
is greatly simplified by the use of Hybrid IC amplifiers far the gsin stages* 

DEMODULATOR BOARD : This circuit takes the 70 KHz center frequency satellite TV signal in the 
10 to 200 millivolt range, detects them using a phase lock loop, de-emphasizes and filters the 
result to produce standard NTSC video. Other outputs include the audio subcarrier, a DC voltage 
proportional to the strength of the 70 HHz signal, and AFC voltage centered at about 2 volts DC. 



DUAL CONVERSION BOARD 

Printed Circuit Board 

6 47 pf chip caps 

2 4,7mid 35vdc 

2 .Olmfd SOvdc disc cap 

4 1.5 to Bpf piston 

trimmer cap 
2 470 ohm l/4w 
2 MHA320 (Motorola) 

1 7815 Voltage Reg. 

1 VTO8090 

1 VT0B24O 

2 1N4O05 

1 DBM500/1IG0 (Varil) 
1 MLP102 (Engleman) 
B SMA Hale Connector 

TOTAL KIT FRICE 



PRICE EACH 

$ 25.00 

1.00 

.59 

.35 

5,99 

as 

8, 65 

1.17 
150.00 
156.25 

. >9 

125.00 

25,00 

5.00 

572.64 



3 


MWA120 


7 


.Olmfd SOvdc 


2 


4.7nfd 35vdc 


1 
5 
1 
1 
2 


lOpf sm 
22pf sm 
I8pf sm 
33pf sm 
330 ohm i/4w 


5 


J.W. Miller 4500-4 


1 


78 15 Voltage Reg. 



TOTAL KIT PRICE 



7.00 

-35 

-59 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

. 15 

4.99 

1.17 

S6.45 



70 HHZ IF BOARD 
Printed Circuit Board 



25.00 



SINGLE AUDIO BOARD 

Printed Circuit Board 

1 3pf sm 

1 Li pi sm 

1 50pf em 

1 6Spf sm 

2 91pf am 

3 .OOlmfd 
3 .Qlmfd 



$ 



PRICE EACH 

15.00 
1*00 
1.00 
1,00 
1.00 
1.00 

.35 

.35 



I ,047mfd 

.47mfd 

lmfd LOvdc 

4,7mfd 35vdc 

470mfd 25vdc 

220K L/4w 

1S0K l/4w 

6.BK l/4w 

3-3K l/4w 

2,2K t/4w 

IK l/4w 
1 10 ohm U4w 
i 50K pot 
1 SK pot 
1 CA3065/MC1353P 
I LM380 

1 7812 Voltage Reg. 
3 2N2222 

2 Miller 9051 
] Miller 9052 

TOTAL KIT PRICE 



.35 

.35 

.59 

.59 

1.29 

as 

.15 

as 
as 

.15 
AS 

,15 
1.00 
1. 00 

2ae 

1.56 

ia? 

,50 
5,99 
5.99 

55.16 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 

(For order* only) prices subject to change without notice 



r ?M ( *I^z elect roi\ic$ 



156 73 Magazine * January, 1983 



■ 



"CHIPS" 



FAIRCHILD 

96H90DC 
95M91DC 
1IC90DC 

11C91DC 
11C060C 
11C050C 

11C01FC 
82S90 



11C24DC 



11C44DC 



VMF AND UHF PRESCALER CHIPS 
350MC Prescaler divide by 10/1 1 
350MC Prescaler divide by 5/6 
650MC Prescaler divide by 10/11 
65QMC Prescaler divide by 5/6 
UHF Prescaler 750MC Type Flip Flop 
iQMz Counter Divide by 4 
(Regular price S75 00) 
Nigh Speed Dual 5/4 Input NO/NOR Gale 
Presettable Higfi Speed Decade/Binary 
Counter used with the 11C90/91 or the 
95H90/91 Prescaler can divide by 100 
[Signetics) 

This chip is the same as a Motorola 
MC4024M324 Dual TTL Voltage Control 
Multivibrator. 

This chip is the same as a Motorola 
MC4044/4344 Phase Frequency Detector, 



PRICE 


HEWLETT PACKARD 






$ 8.50 


MIXERS MODELS 


1Q514A 


10514B 


8 50 


Frequency Range 


2MHz to 500MC 


2MHz to 


1550 






500 MC 


15.50 


Input/Output Frequency L & R 


2O0KHZ to 


200KHZ to 


1230 




500MC 


500MC 




X 


DC iO S0QMC 


DC to 500MC 


50.00 


Mixer Conversion Loss (A) 


7dB 


7dB 


15.40 


(BJ 


9dB 


9dB 




Noise Performance (SS8| (A) 


7dB 


7dB 




(B) 


9dB 


90S 




PRICE 


$49.99 PRICE 


$39 99 



5.00 

3,37 
3.37 



GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. GUNN DIODE MODEL Y 2107 

Freq. Gap {GHZ) \2 to 18. Output (Mm.) lOOmW. Ouiy f%) 

CW, Typ Bias fVdc) B0, Type Opei (MAdc) 550, Max Thres 

<mAdc> 1 000, Max Bias (Vdc) 10.0. 

VARIAN GALLIUM ARSENIDE GUNN DIODES MODEL VSX9201S5 

Freq Coverages to 12.4GHz. Output fMm J 100mW. B«as 

Voltage (Max ) 14vdc, Bias current (mAdCj Operating 550 Typ 

750 Max . Threshold 850 Tup. 1GO0 Max $39.99 

VARl L Co, Inc. MODEL SS 43 AM MODULATOR 

Freq Range 60 10 150MC, Insertion Loss i3dB Nominal, 

Signal Port Imp SOohms Nominal, Signal Port Rf Power 

+ lOdBm Max , Modulation Port BW DC to 1KH2, Modulation 

Port Bias 1 ma Nominal. $24.99 



AVANTEKCASCADABLE 
MODULAR AMPLIFIERS 

Frequency Range 

Gain 

Noise Figure 

Power Output 



Gam Flatness 
Inpul Power Vdc 

mA 



Model UTO-504 UTO-511 



PRICE 



5 to 500 MHZ 


5 to 500 MHz 


6dB 




15dB 


lldB 




2 3dB to 3dB 


+ 17dB 




-2dBt0 
-3dB 


IdB 




1dB 


+ 24 




+ 15 


100 




10 


$70 00 


PRICE 


$75.00 



CROSSING IN5THUCTI0NS 

DEFECTIVE MATERIAL 4 : a . d**cct<v« malarial mult D* mam within ataTtf (SO* 0»jf* *ftw 'KfrEt of 
s*t* a c • j :■* i -t L;it vn&uOm tfta 3ataen»a material < T p* t»t; <ny py f dmih . m* twpq TWtjaf . and ma flate 
a* IHifctaM AM iiMtfi* *»H»*l t* pictKi propmrtf v * *<*> *f*e » * i^aniia* 

DEUVE *¥ 0*?t't rt --5'^* -t tmppeti: *»m»n 40 iwm after r*ce*ot o* cuiTorrw > gmoe» if ■ pvl ft» lo b» 
=*=*C-a#'a3 [Tm£u*!fl»"it^t*Xrt'S«3 Ournonr»i ifrippwifl nurt- : - s. i- I'CiHlWl or UPS departing an 
I ._** •>-'3 **>B ht 3" r ** 3*C*»3« Of !*St «3ti!Qmen* tf <i by Air gniy FOB »rve&t*Q 00""' 
FOREIGN OHCrfRI: AK lwa*gft o*3eri rtwsJ % prepaid »«Ch £aih*r> cnac* V mOTpr order made Wit m US 
Fyntfi Wa at* sorry But C 1 not avaitao** to foreign C0u"l-'« ana La"f+* or Credit are W! an KC#pi»'« 
form or p*ym#ft1 ♦ittht- Further informal irx >* atrai las.it on faqveil 

rtQUWS WonO*r Ihru Sei ureUy a » a m lit 5 «3 D m 

INSURANCE ff iiH irNCiuda i$t 'or eat* 1 addihena IIOD.DO 0»*» HDD 00, Un«*fl P*r£«< only 

OHQER FORMS N*w on1*i Formi ar* incruded mth fltch o*tJ» *fl' jreuf cafwaniifK-e Aaariionai "orms are 

atraKpclc on t*quasl 

POSTAGE: M.nifTiLfm iriipping and n*Tiai,ftg m tha US. Cinada. aMJ Manco n $2 SO an otfw* counlnas istS 00 

D--, ICifBfO" ord»r> inclufl* ^^ Ihippmg ana np-ndiljnB. 

PREPAID ORDf R8: Or9«r mult H ftccompantea oy a clecn 

PRICESl Pric*i af» tuojael Id cnairoe witnoui notita 

REStOCR CHARGE: If pans «ra ratumed to MHZ ElpgC^nics dua loouitomir error cuatomer will ba fiald 

raiponnble ror all antra Fata, will bt cnarfjad a 15% r« slocking rag, witfi ttia famairnJer in croaw onty All rei U rns 

muil hive approval 

SALES TAX: Af.rom musi add $Vt lain tan, un^ss a gignad Ariiena raati* i*k Ciftf is curftnil^ on Me wilri 

MHZ E lac iron it* All ord«rt piaceH by parsons ou Hilda si Anjiona, ti-u l dtllvared 10 pariona in Anion a are sub- 

j«d lo in* 5% lalai tn 

SHORTAGE OR OAHA0E: AM cliirrs ror ^hoitagat 0' dimagvs muii bm mada wiltim 5 days a Tier receipt o J 

oarcet Claimi m u ii include &ur m«ifca numtjgr »nra ihe dare of pu*ena*# Cuilomart wnich tfo not notliy m 

*itnm mn nm# period win o» naro 'earjansirjia tor iht frrn™ or^ti' ai #* aitkl conahder ina ord*! 1 complaEa 

OUP BOO NUMBEP IS STWlCTLT FOfl ORDERS OHt.r 
SO INFORMATION WUL BE 6iV€N t flOOiM 0T» 



FREQUENCY SOURCES, INC MODEL MS 74X 
MICROWAVE SIGNAL SOURCE 

MS 74X Mechanically Tunable Frequency Range (MHz) 10630 10 
11230 (10-63 to 11.23GHz) Minimum Output Power (mW) 10, Overall 
Multiplier Ratio 108, Internal Crystal Osctiiator Frequency Range 
(MHz) 98 4 to 104 0. Maximum Input Current (mA) 400 
The signal source are designed for applications whefe high stability 
and lo* noise are of pf ime concern these sources uhlrze fundamen- 
tal transistor oscillators with high O coastal cavities, followed by 
broadband stable step recovery diode multiptiefs This design 
aMows Single screw mechanical adjustment of frequency over stan- 
dard communications bands Broadband sampling circuits are used 
to phase loci* me oscillator to a high stability reference which may 
be either an internal self-contained crystal oscillator. eatemaJ 
primary standard or VHF synthesizer This unique technique allows 
tor optimization of both FM noise and long term stability List Price 
*sSlt58 00(THESE ARE NEWj Our Price— $289, 



HEWLETT PACKARD 1N5712 MICROWAVE DIODE 

This diode will replace the MBDiQI, 1N571 V 5062-2800. 

5082 2835 ect Th*s will work Like a champ in ail those 

Down Converter projects Sl.SQ or 10/110,00 

MOTOROLA MHW1172R LOW DISTORTION 

WIDEBAND AMPLIFIER MODULE. 

Frequency Range: 40 to 300 MHz., Power Gain al 50MHz 

16.6mm to 17 4max , Gam Flalness ±0 1 Typ ±0 2 

Max dB , DC Supply Voltage - 26vdc. RF Voltage Input 

+ 70dBmV PRICE S29 99 

GENERAL ELECTRIC AA NICADS 

Model #41B905HD11-G1 

Pack of 6 for $5,00 or &0 CetlS, 10 Packs for $45.00 

These may be broken down to individual cells 



TERVS DOMESTIC Prep*td< C O.D. <x OwJ+t Ca^J 

FOREIGN Pr»s*iti only. U S Funds— mo*»«y a*d*^ Q* cis*u«f * cteck oniTr 
C-O.D-- *cc*5it*e-# by t#i*pt*ctf« or mail P*yrrt#it irom cuHQ'"*' *m\ Be &y cult morwy ocdcr o* c«nw » 
checfc W» in totfy but we cannot act»pl Pffftonml chacki To* C O D * 

CON FIRMING 0HDEA5: Wa would prefer !h»t conlitmiflQ o*0>rf not 6* »«^i a"e r a letephww ortter h.»t owa^ 
plated ii company poocy nacessiUtaa a confirming orrj«r„ pi*at« mark CONFIRMING r boa^y Qr\ if»a ord»f 
it pro&hfrmi or dupl'cai* *hlpn»nts occur out io an order *n<ch ta ™x p»op*Kty maTked. custom*** will few 
nans rasponaibla »o* any charge* .ncarrad. plus a 15% ra*1«k charge on raiuined pans 

CREDIT CARDS *E fcCCEm MASTERCARD VIS* AND AMEBiCaN ElCPRES^ 

DATA SHEETS: Wrven wa nave dati sheals m sioch on device* *a no tuppLy them wiiti the wder 



j 



tfM^ti 



wastei charge 







electroqic^ 



^48 



(602) 242-3037 

(602) 242 Bft 16 

2111 W. CAMEL8ACK ROAD 

PHOENIX, ARIZONA 6&01& 

Toll Free Number 
800-528 0180 
(For order* only) 




See Irsr of Adversers on page T 14 



73 Magazine • January, 1963 157 



NEW LOW-NOISE PRE AM PS RECEIVING CONVERTERS TRANSMIT CONVERTERS 



New tow-noise microwave transistors make 
preamps in the 0,9 to 1,0 dB noise figure 
range possible without the fragility and power 
supply problems of gas-fet's. Units furnished 
wired and tuned to ham band. Can be easily 
retuned to nearby f req, 




Models LNAt h 
P3Q, andP432 

shown 



Model 

LNA 28 
LNA 50 

LNA 144 
LNA 220 

LNA 432 



Tunable 

Freq Range 

20-40 

40-70 
120-190 
180-250 

360*470 



Noise Figure Gain Price 

0.9 dB 20 dB $39.95 

0.3 dB 20 dB $3995 

1.0 dB 18 dB $39,95 

1,0 dB 17dB $39.95 

1.0 dB 1BdB $44.95 



ECONOMY PREAMPS 



Our traditional preamps, proven in years of 
service. Over 20,000 in use throughout the 
world. Tuneable over narrow range. Specify 
exact freq. band needed Gain 16-20 dB. NF = 
2 dB or tess.VHF units available 27 to 300 MHz. 
UHF units available 300 to 650 MHz. 

• P30K, VHP Kit less case $14.95 

• P30C, VHF Kit with case $20.95 

• P30W, VHF Wired/Tested $29.95 

• P432K t UHF Kit less case $18.95 

• P432C, UHF Kit with case $24.95 

• P432W, UHF Wired/Tested $33.95 

P432 also available in broadband version to 
cover 20-650 MHz without tuning. Same price 
as P432; add H B" to model #. 



HELICAL RESONATOR 
PREAMPS 



- 






Our lab has developed a new line of low-noise 
receiver preamps with helical resonator filters 
built in. Thecombination of a low noise amplifier 
similar to the LN Asenes and the sharp selectivity 
of a 3 or 4 section helical resonator provides 
increased sensitivity while reducing intermod 
and cross*band interference in critical appli* 
cations. See selectivity curves at right Noise 
figure = 1 to 1.2 dB. Gain = 12 to 15 dB. 



Model 

HRA-144 
HRA-220 
HRA-432 



Tuning Range 

143-150 MHz 
213-233 MHz 
420-450 MHz 



Price 

$49,95 
$49.95 

$59.95 




Models to cover every practical rf & if range to 
listen to SSB, FM ATV, etc. NF = 2 dB or less. 



VHF MODELS 

Kit $44,95 

Less Case $39.95 

Wired $59,95 



Antenna 
Input Range 

28-32 

50-52 

50-54 
144-146 
145-147 
144-144.4 
146-148 
144-145 

220-222 
220-224 
222-226 
220-224 
222-224 



Receiver 
Output 

144-146 
28-30 

144-148 
28-30 
28-30 

27-27.4 
28-30 
50-54 
28-30 

144-148 

144-148 
50-54 
28-30 



UHF MODELS 

Kit $54.95 

Less Case $49.95 

Wired $74,95 



432-434 
435-437 
432-436 
432-436 
43925 



28-30 

28-30 

144-148 

50-54 
61,25 



SCANNER CONVERTERS Copy 72-76, 135* 
1 44, 240-270, 400-420, or 806-894 MHz bands 
on any scanner. Wired/tested Only $79.95. 

SPECIAL FREQUENCY CONVERTERS made 
to custom order $1 1 9.95. Call for details. 



SAVE A BUNDLE ON 
VHF FM TRANSCEIVERS! 



FM-5 PC Board Kit - ONLY $1 59.95 

complete with controls, heats ink, etc. 

10 Watts, 5 Channels, for 6M f 2M, or 220 



White supply 
lasts, get $59.95 
cabinet kit free when 
you buy an FM-5 Transceiver kit. 
Where else can you get a complete transceiver 
for only $159,95? 



For SSB, CW, ATV t FM, eta Why pay big 
bucks for a multi mode rig for each band? Can 
be linked with receive converters for 

transceiver 2 waits output. 



Exciter 
Input Range 



Antenna 
Output 



For VHF, 
Model XV2 
Kit 379.95 
Wired $119,95 
(Specify band) 



For UHF, 
Model XV4 
Kit $99.95 
Wired $149.95 




28-30 


144-146 


28-29 


145-146 


28-30 


50-52 


27-27,4 


144-1444 


28-30 


220-222 


50-54 


220-224 


144-146 


50-52 


50-54 


144-148 


144-146 


28-30 


28-30 


432-434 


28-30 


435-437 


50-54 


432-436 


61.25 


439.25 


144-148 


432-436* 


'Add $35 for 2 M input 



For limited time, 
buy a transmit converter 
above with 40-45W PA 
($129.95) and get $39.95 
cabinet FREE. 




• 



LOOK AT THESE 
ATTRACTIVE CURVES! 




r p 


___ H - - +■ e 




_._:_ljJ_::i:_::/::_:v::: 


J J 1 




rt& '+1 1*4. VJ ifct ElL £1 t" f»= «-■■■ 



R144 & R220 Front Ends, HRA 144/220, & HRF- 144/220 



j - 












( 




1 


























































































±; 


/ 
















































'A. 




.1 




4 


ft 


o 1 * 
4.46 






1 


n- 








R451 Receiver Front End 



Typic&t Selectivity Curves 

of R&ceivers and 
Helical Resonators, 





Rcvr l-F Selectivity 








~r~ 


























. 














i 














f 

\i 










j 


J 




1 






1 




4 










/ 




























' 












































-, 




¥ 






(■4 
■■.■ 4 




h:. 










H 


Rj 


V 


V< 


IS 


J 


Hf 


}F 


'■** 


*2 


2 





Call or Write for FREE CATALOG 

{Send $1.00 or 4 IRC'c for overseas mailing) 

Order by phone or mail • Add S2S& H per order 
(Electronic answering service evenings & weekends) 
Use VISA, MASTERCARD, Check, or UPS COD. 



am ironies, inc. 

65-W MOUL RD. • HILTON NY 14468 

Phone: 716-392-9430 

Hamtronics * is a registered trademark f 33 




For years, Hamtronics • 

Modules have been used by 
individual hams and manufac- 
turers to make repeaters, Now, in 
the Hamtronics tradition of top 
quality and superb value, we are proud 
to offer a complete repeater package. 



JUST LOOK AT THESE PRICES! 



Band 



6M.2M.220 
440 



S595 
5645 



Wrred/Tested 

S745 
$795 



Both kit and wir&d umts am complete with a// parts, module*, hardware, and crystals. 

CALL OR WRITE FOR COMPLETE DETAILS. 

Also available tor remote site ifnkfng/crassband & TOM 





CTHCl 



»»IO0 




FEATURES: 

• SENSITIVITY SECOND TO NONE; TYPICALLY 
CHS uV ON VHF. 0.2 uV ON UHF. 

• SELECTIVITY THAT CANT BE BEAT! BOTH 

8 POLE CRYSTAL FILTER & CERAMIC FILTER FOR 
GREATER THAN 100 dB AT ± 12KHZ. HELICAL 
RESONATOR FRONT ENDS. SEE R144, R220, 
AND R451 SPECS IN RECEIVER AD BELOW. 

• OTHER GREAT RECEIVER FEATURES: FLUTTER- 
PROOF SOUELCH. AFC TO COMPENSATE FOR 
OFF-FREQ TRANSMITTERS, SEPARATE LOCAL 
SPEAKER AMPLIFIER & CONTROL, 

• CLEAN, EASY-TUNE TRANSMITTER; UP TO 20 WATTS OUT. 



HIGH QUALITY MODULES FOR 
REPEATERS, LINKS, TELEMETRY, J 



INTRODUCING — 
NEW 1 983 RECEIVERS 




r 



R144 Shown 

* R144/R220FMRCVRSfor2Mor220MHz. 
0/1 5uVsens.; S pole xtal f liter & ceramic filter 
in i-f, helical resonator front end for exceptional 
selectivity (curves at left). AFC incl., )dal oven 
avail. Kit only $119.95 

R451 FM RCVR Same but for uhL Tuned line 
front end, 0*2 uV sens. Kit onfy $1 19-95. 

R76 FM RCVR for 10M, 6M, 2M f 220, or 
commercial bands. As above, but w/o AFC or 
heL res. Kits only $109,95. 
Also avail w/4 pole filter, only S94*95/ kit 



R1 1 VHF AM RECEIVER kit fof VHF aircraft 
band or ham bands. Only $64.95. 

R110 UHF AM RECEIVER for UHF uses, 
including special 296 MHz model to hear 
SPACE SHUTTLE. Kit $94.95. 





•tfTrfi 




HELICAL RESONATOR FILTERS available 
separately on pcb w/connectors. 

HRF-144 for 143-150 MHz $34.95 
HRF-220 for 213-233 MHz $34.95 
HRF-432 for 420-450 MHz S44.95 

(See selectivity ctxves at left} 




• COR KITS With audio mixer and speaker 
amplifier. Only $29.95. 

• CWID KITS 156 bits, field programmable, 
clean audio. Only $59.95. 



i 




A1 6 RF TIG HT BOX Deep drawn alum, case 
with tight cover and no seams. 7x8x2 inches. 
Only $18.00. 



TRANSMITTERS AND 
ACCESSORIES 




*VfW 



• T51 VHF FM EXCITER for 10M, 6M P 2M, 
220 MHz or adjacent oands. 2 Watts contin- 
uous. Kits only $59,95 




* 



* Jff ** 



T451 UHFFM EXCITER 2 to 3 Watts on 450 
ham band or adjacent. Kits only S69.95- 

VHF & UHF LI NEAR AMPLIFIERS. Use on 
either FM or SSB. Power levels from 1010 45 
Watts to go with exciters & xmtg converters. 
Kits from $69.95 



^33 



ronics 



INTRODUCING SONY'S NEW DIGITAL 
/--^ DIRECT ACCESS RECEIVER! 




Revolutionary 
Instant Access Digital 
Shortwave Scanner 



• Continuous Scanning of LW, MW, SW, & FM Bands 

• Instant Fingertip Tuning— No More Knobs! 

• 6 Memories for Any Mode (AM f SSB/CW, & FM) 

• Dual PLL Frequency Synthesized — No Drift! 



A WHOLE NEW BREED OF RADIO IS HERE NOW! No other 
Short wave receiver combines so many advanced features for 
both operating convenience and high performance as does the 
new Sony ICF-2001. Once you have operated this exciting new 
radio, youll be spoiled forever! Direct access tuning eliminates 
conventional tuning knobs and dials with a convenient digital 
keyboard and Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) for accurate frequen- 
cy readout to within 1 KHz. Instant fingertip tuning, up to 8 
memory presets, and continuous scanning features make the 
fCF-2001 the ultimate in convenience. 

Compare the fallowing features against any receiver currently 
available and you will have to agree that the Sony ICF 2001 is the 
best value In shortwave receivers today: 

DUAL PLL SYNTHESIZER CIRCUITRY covers entire 150 KHz to 
29999 MHz band PLL, circuit has 100 KHz step while PLL 2 
handles i KHz step, both of which are controlled by separate 
quartz crystal oscillators for precise, no-drift tuning, DUAL CON- 
VERSION SUPERHETERODYNE circuitry assures superior AM 
reception and high image rejection characteristics The 107 MHz 
IF of the FM band is utilized as the 2nd IF of the AM band A new 
type of crystal filter made especially for this purpose realizes 
clearer reception than commonly used ceramic filters ALL FET 
FRONT END for high sensitivity and Interference rejection, Inter- 
modulation, cross modulation, and spurious Interference are ef- 
fectively rejected. FET RF AMP contributes to superior Image re- 
jection, high sensitivity, and good signal to noise fatlo. Both 
strong and weak stations are received with minimal distortion. 



EXTENDED SPECTRUM CONTINUOUS TUNING 




AM 



r«r 



to 29,999 KHz j hi Ifif ' 
—tew *** iwi K& ifrfl 




FM 
76 to 106, 
MHz 



A Enter Button 
B Signal Strength 

Indicator 
C Liquid Crystal Display 
D Memory Preset Buttons 
E Antenna Adjustment 

Dial 



F SSB/CW Compensator 

G Execute Bar 

H Manual Tuning Buttons 

I Scan Button 

J High/Low Limit Buttons 



OPERATIONAL FEATURES 
INSTANT FINGERTIP TUNING with the calculator-type key board 
enables the operator to have instant access to any frequency In 
the LW, MW, SW, and FM bands. And the LCD digital frequency 
display confirms the exact, drlft-free signal being received. 
AUTOMATIC SCANNING of the above bands. Continuous 
scanning of any desired portion of the band is achieved by 
setting the L, " and L 2 " keys io define the range to be scanned. 
The scanner can stop automatically on strong signals, or it can 
be done manually MANUAL SEARCH is similar to the manual 
scan mode and is useful for quick signal searching, The "UP" 
and DOWN' keys let the tuner search for you. The "FAST" key 
increases the search rate for faster signal deteciton MEMORY 
PRESETS. Six memory keys hold desired stations for instant 
one-key tuning In any mode (AM. SSB/CW, and'FM), and also, the 
"L, 11 and "L^ 11 keys can give you two more memory slots when 
not used for scanning. OTHER FEATURES: Local, normal, DX 
sensitivity selector tor AM; SSB/CW compensator; 90 min. sleep 
timer; AM Ant, Adjust. 



SPECIFICATIONS 
CIRCUIT SYSTEM: Fm Superheterodyne; AM Dual conversion 
superheterodyne. SIGNAL CIRCUITRY: 4 IC s 11 FETs. 23 
Transistors. 16 Diodes. AUXILIARY CIRCUITRY: 5 IC S. 1 LSI, 5 
LEO'S, 25 Transistors, 9 Diodes FREQUENCY RANGE: FM 
76*108 MHz; AM 150-29.999 KHz INTERMEDIATE FREQUENCY: 
FM 10.7 MHz.; AM 1 St 66.35 MHz, 2nd 10-7 MHz ANTENNAS: FM 
lelescopic, ext, ant. terminal; AM telescopic buillin lerrite bar, 
ext. ant. terminal. POWER: 4.5 VDC/120 VAC DIMENSIONS: 1214 
(W)X 2V4 (H)X6^ in). WEIGHT: 3 lb. 15 oz. (1.8 kg) 






ismssii the first name in Counters ! 




Efillii 




t'T *t »ir«l 1 Ki/iunnr, 


1124.4) 


ll '«:■ k I- * 1 l1« l, PPJll WMT 




nag 


.■IV i' 


^1 1 \* idiiKir 


)4J 


itp l Nkad pici » ac 




Atl*|H»'. , (.'h*rii** 


13.95 


(>V ] Mlu|'j-ffn*cr Oven 




HlhF fair 


IS.fS 


► Kr'llll linif fli-r nijllJ 


H« 



9 DIGITS 600 MHz 



The CT-90 is the ami versatile, feature packed counter available for less 
than $300,00* Advanced design features include; three selectable, gate times, 
nine digits, gate indicator and i unique display hold function which holds the 
displayed count after the input signal is removed? Also* a lOmHiTCXOtime 
base is used which enable* easy zero beat calibration checks a gains I WWV, 
Optionally: an in te m a I nic ad battery pack, ex te rnal time base input and M icro- 
power high stability crystal oven time base are available, The CT-90, 
performance you can count on! 



$129^ 

M,x *"' WIRED 



SPECIFICATIONS 



Range; 


20 Hi to 600 MHz 


Sensitivity: 


Lets than 10 MV to 150 MHz 




Lew than 50 MV to 500 MHz 


Resolution 


0.1 H/HO MHi range) 




],0 H*l60 MHi range) 




10.0 Hi (600 MHz range) 


Display: 


9 digit* 0.4" LED 


Time base; 


Standard- 10. 000 mHz, 1.0 ppm 20-40T. 




Optional Micro power oven-O.L ppm 20-40* C 


Power 


8 IS VACta 250 ma 



7 DIGITS 525 MHz $99 



WIRED 




SPECIFICATIONS 



Range 
Setuitivity 

Resohitiw 



Display 
Time base 
Power 



20 Hi to 525 MHr 

Uss than 50 MV to 150 MHz 
Less than 150 MV to 500 MHz 
10 Hz (5 MHz range* 
10.0 Hi (50 MH* ranged 
100.0 Hi (500 MHi range) 
7 digit* 0,4" LED 
L0 ppm TCXO 2{M0 C 
12 VAC@ 250 ma 



The CT-70 breaks the price barrier on lab quality frequency counters 
Deluxe features such as three frequency ranges - each with pre- amplification* 
dual selectable gate times, and gate activity indication make measurements a 
map. The wide frequency range enables you to accurately measure signals 

from audio thru UHF with i ppm accuracy - thai* s .0001 %! The CTT0 is 

the answer to all your measure mc m needs, in the field lab or ham shack 



PRICES 



CT-70 wired, I year warranty 


$99 95 


CT-70 Kit 90 day parts war 




Tamy 


§4 95 


AC-I AC adapter 


395 


BP-i Nicad pack + AC 




adapter/ charger 


1295 



7 DIGITS 500 MHz $79 ss 




WIRED 



MINI- 100 wired, I year 

warranty 179.95 

AC- Z Ac adapter for MINl- 

100 3.95 

BP 2 Nicad pack and AC 

adapter charger 12.95 



Here's a handy, general purpose counter thai provides most counter 
functions ai an unbelievable price. The MINI- 100 doesn't have the fill) 
frequency range or input impedance qualities found in higher price units, but 
for banc RF signal measurementi, it can'i be beat! Accurate measurements 
can be made from 1 MHz *B the way up to 5 00 MHz with excellent lensitivity 
throughout the range, and the two gate tunes let you select the resolution 
desired. Add the nicad pack option and the MINI 100 makes an ideal addition 
lo your Cool boi for in- the- field frequency checks and repairs 



SPECIFICATIONS; 



Range: 
Sensitivity; 

Resolution, 

Display 
Tune base: 
Power 



I MHz to 500 MHr 
Less than 2i MV 
100 Hz (slow gale) 
1.0 KH* (fast gate] 
7 digits, 4" LEO 
2.0 ppm 20-40 C 
5 VDC « 200 ma 



DIGITS 600 MHz $159 





SPECIFICATIONS: 


1 w 


Range: 


20 Hz to 600 MHz 


Sensitivity! 


Less than 25 mv to 1 50 MHz 


Resolution; 


Less than 1 50 mv lo 600 MH 
L0 Hz (60 MH? range \ 




10.0 Hz (600 MHz range j 


Display: 


8 digits 0.4" LED 


Time basr 


2,0 ppmZCMOX 


Power. 


110 VAC or 12 VDC 



WIRED 




The CT-50 is a versatile lab bench counter that will measure up to 6 00 MHz 
with 8 digit precision, And one of its best features is the Receive Frequency 
1 Adapter, which mms the CT-50 into a digital readout for any receiver. The 
adapter is easily programmed for any receiver and a simple connection to the 
receiver's VFO is all that is required for use Adding the receiver adapter in no 
way hmil* the operation of the CT-50, the adapter can be conveniently 
twitched on or off The CT-50, a counter that can work double-duty 



PRICES: 

CT-50 wired, I year warranty 

CT-50 Kit. 90 day parts 

warranty 

RA- 1, receiver adapter kit 

RA I wired arid pre- progranv 

med f send copy of receiver 

schematic) 



St 59.95 

119,95 
1495 



2995 




DIGITAL MULTIMETER $99^ 



WIRED 



PRICES: 




DM- 700 wired 1 year warranty 


$99,95 


DM700 Kit, 90 day parts 




warranty 


79.95 


AC- 1 . AC adaptor 


3.95 


BP-3, Nicad pack +AC 




adapter/ charger 


19.95 


MP 1. Probe kit 


2 95 



The DM -700 offers professional quality performance at a hobbyist price. 
Features include; 26 different ranges and 5 functions, ail arranged in a 
convenient, ea*v to use format. Measurements axe displayed on a large VA 
digit, Vi inch LED readout with automatic decimal placement, automatic 
polarity, overmngc indication and overload protection up to 1250vi <k\ . in .ill 
ranges, mukinu. it virtually goof-proof! The DM -700 looks great, a handsome, 
jet black, rugged AB5 case with convenient retractable tilt bail makes \i an 
ideal addition to any shop- 



SPECIFICATIONS 

DCV AC volts: lOOuV to 1 KV. 5 range! 

DC/ AC 

I uA to 2.0 Amps. 5 range 

1 ohms to 20 Megohms, 6 ranges 



Current 

Resistance 

Input 

impedance 

Accuracy; 

Power 



10 Megohms, DO AC volts 
0.1% basic DC volts 
4 C cells 



AUDIO SCALER 



F or high re toluuonaiKfo measurements, multiplies 
UP in fr eque ncy. 

• Great for PL tones 

• Multiplies by 10 or 100 

• 0.01 Hi resolution! 

129 95 Kit £39.95 Wired 



ACCESSORIES 



TeJescopic whip antenna - BNC plug ....,,- 
High impedance probe; light loading 

Low pass probe, for audio measurements 

Direct probe, general purpose usage 

Tite baiL for CT 70, 90, M1NM00 

Color burst calibration unit, calibrates counter 
agautit color TV signal. .... — . ■ . 



'#■#■»■ 



- -r m m 



% T95 

1595 

15 95 

12 95 

3.95 

14.95 



COUNTER PREAMP 

For measuring e*tremelv weak signals from 10 to I 00C 
MHi Small iue. poweted by plug iransformer- included 

• Flat 25 db gain 

• BNC Connector* 

• Great for sniffing RF with pick- up 

$34 95 Kit 144.95 Wired 




ramsey Electronics, inc. 

2575 Baird Rd. Penfield. NY 14526 ^*a 



PHONE ORDERS 
CALL 716-586-3950 



K\1S 



p«ru a *n onbg.no> fofi* loi r«lki"d Add i' for *H.ppm^ 

irnurorn* 'a a <ngi imu*n p* $ I Owt'lfOI ad^ I $ S COD odd 
i? Q'4w\ uddtJ Si odd 1 I 50 AH -et.d«nf\ odd 7 "n* 



See List of Advertisers or} page 114 



73 Magazine * January, 1983 161 



DEALER DIRECTORY 



Culver City CA 

Jim's Electronic^ 3919 Scpulvixia Blvd., Culver 
City CA WJ230. 3W-tt003. Trades 4ftl-l886 San 
Diego 827-5732 (Reno NV), 

Fontana CA 

Complete lint^ TCOM 3 Dt-nTmii^ Ten-Tec > 
Mirage, Cubic, Lunar, over 4000 electronic pn.id 
nets fur hubbvist. technician, rxperiiinenter. Also 
CB radio. I an<i mobile. Fan Lena Electronics, 3fi28 
Sierra Ave.. F on tuna CA 92335, 822-7710. 



New Castle DU 

Factory Authorised Dealer E Yaesu, [COM. Tt-n- 
Tec, KDK, Axden, AEA t Kantronks, Santec, Full 
Line trf Accessories. N r o Sales Tju in Delaware, 
One mile off I-JJ5. Delaware Amateur Supply „ 
71 Meadow Koad T New Caslle DE 19720, 

San Jose CA 

Buy area's newest Amateur Radio store. New & 
used Amateur Radio .sales & service. We feature 
Kenwood, ICOM, Azden T Yaesu,, Ten- Tec, San- 
tee Ec mam more. Shaver Radio, live., 1378 So. 
Bascom Ave,. Sail Juw- CA y.5l2d. 998- J UM. 

Smyrna GA 

For your Kenwood, Yaesu, ICOM, Drake and 
other amateur needs* come to see us. Brill's Two- 
Wav Radio, 2306 N, Atlanta Rd.. Smyrna CA 
30080. 432-8006. 



Buffalo NY 
WESTERN NEW YORK 

Niagara Frontier's only full stocking Amateur 
dealer. Also Shortwave, CB, Scanners* Marine. 
Commercial. Operating displays featuring Ken- 
wood and others. Towers, Antennas, SaJos and 
Service, DX Communications, 3214 Transit Road, 
West Seneca NY, 668-S873. 

Amsterdam NY 
UPSTATE NEW YORK 

Kenwood, ICOM, Drake,, plus muuy otbcf lines ; 
Amateur Dealer for Over 35 yeott. Adirondack Ra- 
di<> Supply, Jr»t\, 1$5 West Main Street,, Amster- 
dam hfVi£010 t 842-8350. 



Preston ID 

Ross WB7BYZ has the Largest Stuck o( Amateur 
Gear in the Intermountain West and the Best 
Prices. Call me fur all vour ham needs. Ross 
Distributing, 78 So, State. Preston ID 83263 T 
852-0830, 

Bloom tngton, IL 

BOKN TOWERS— Large stock plus all UNAFU 
CO ROUES* items available for last drop ship- 
ments. Wholesale prices to all userv Alsci whole- 
sale distributor for Antenna Special i^ta, Regency, 
and Wilson. Hill Radio 2503 G.E. Road Bo* 14015. 
Bhnmington, IL 61701 663-2 HI 



~rw* 



Terre Haute IN 

Your bam headquarters located in the heart oF the 
rnidwest, Monster Kli.tiranic.-i. Inc., '0 Meadows 
Center, P f O. Box 330U Terre Haule IN 478003, 
238-1456. 

"Tittleton MA 



The Reliable Ham Store Serving N.E. Full line of 
I COM & Kenwood. Yaesu HTs, Drake, Paiwa. 
B&W accessories, Curtis & Ttac kevers, Larsen, 
Hustler, Telex/Hy-Gain products, Mira^ amps,, 
Astron P.S,, Alpha Ddtn protectors, ARAL. 6c 
Kant monies instruction aids. Whistler radar detec- 
tors. Full line of coax fittings. TEL-COM Elec- 
tronic Communications 675 Great Rd. (Rt. 110), 
Littleton MA 01460, 617-486-3400/3040. 

Ann Arbor Ml 

See us for products like Ten 'Tec, ll. L- Drake, 
DenTtqn and manv more. Open Monday through 
Sa5urtlay + 0&30 to' 1730. WB&VGR, WB8UXO, 
WD80KN and W8RP behind the counter. Pur- 
cha.se Radio Supply, 327 E. Hoover Ave., Ann Ar- 
hor Ml 48104,6(^8606. 

Hudson NH 

New England's Distributor and Authorized Ser- 
vice Center for all Ma] Of Amateur Lines. Tufts 
Radio Electronic, Inc., hi TuiwlII Ri*ad, Hudton 
NH 03051,883-5005. 

Somerset NJ 

New Jersey's only factory 'authorized 1COM aiad 
Yaesu distributor. Large Inventory of ne^ and 
wysl sp^;iaJs M<*1 Jiiajof brands m stock. Com- 
plete service and facilities. Radios Unlimited. 1760 
Easton Avenue, P.O. Box 347, Somerset NJ 08873, 
460-4599. 



Syracuse-Rome- Utica NY 

Featuring: Kenwood, Yaesu 1 ICOM, Drake, Ten- 
Tec, Swan, DenTron, Alpha. Robot, MF], Tem- 
po, Astnm, KLM, Hy-Galn, Mostey, Larsen, 
Cuslicrafl, I hustler, MiniPtoducts. You won't be 
disappointed with equipment/service. Radio 
World, Oneida f.Vumh Airport-Terminal Build- 
up OrisUny NY 13424, 736-0184. 

Columbus OH 

The biggest and I jest Ham Store hi the [n id west 
featuring quality Kenwood products with work- 
ing displays We sell only the best. Authorized 
Kenwood Service. Universal Amateur Radio Inc., 
1280 Aida Dr., Revnoldsburg (Columbus} OH 
43068, 866-4267, 

Bend OR 

Satellite TV. Known brands. Call today for more 
information and inquire about our dealer pro- 
gram. WESFERCOM, P.O. Box 7226, Bend OR 
9770S, 389-0996, 

Philadelphia PA/ 
Camden NJ 

Waveguide St Coaxial Microwave Components fie 
Equipment, Laboratory Grade Test Instruments, 
Power Supplier, Ru\, Sell & Trade all popular 
makes— HP, GR, FXR, ESI, Sorensen. Singer, 
etc. Lectronic Research Labs, 1423 Ferrv Ave., 
Camden NJ 08104, 541-4200. 

Scran ton PA 

ICOM, Bird, Cushcraft, Beckman, Fluke, Lar- 
sen, Hurler, Antenna Specialists, Astron, Avanti, 
Beltkn, W&ATJ/W2VS S CDE, AEA, Vibropk-x, 
Ham -Key, CES, Am phenol, Sony, Fannnf Couri- 
er, B&W h Ameeo, Shun:. l.aRoe Electronics, 1112 
Grand view St. T Scran ton PA 18509, 343-2124. 

San Antonio TX 

Amateur, Commercial 2- way. Selling Antenna 
Specialists, Avanti. Azden, Bird, Hy-Gain, Stan- 
dard,, Vibroplex, Midland, Henr> 7 , Cushcraft, 
Dielectric, Hustler, ICOM, MFj, Nye, Shure, 
Cubic, Tempo. Ten -Tec and others. Appliance 5c 
Equipment Co,, Inc. 2317 Vance Jackson Road T 
San Antonio TX 78213. 734-7793. 

DEALERS 

Your company name and message 
can contain up to 25 words for as little 
as $150 yearly (prepaid), or $15 per 
month (prepaid quarterly). No men- 
tion oj mail-order business or area 
code permitted. Directory text and 
payment must reach us 60 days in ad- 
vance oj publication. For example, 
advertising for the March. '83 issue 
must he in our hand? hy Jan. 1st. Mail 
to 73 Magazine, Peterborough NH 
03458. ATTN: Nancy Ciampa. 



DEALER DIRECTORY 



PROPAGATION 



J, H. Nelson 
4 Plymouth Dr. 
Whiting NJ 08759 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO 



GMT: 


no 


02 


04 


06 


oa 


10 


Yl 


14 


16 


ie 


iii 


n 


ALASKA 


14A 


7A 


7 


7 


3A 


iA 


3A 


7B 


7D 


14 


21A 


21A 


ARGENTINA 


21 


1 1 


7B 


Jh 


7B 


7 


T4 


21A 


2\ A 


21A 


21A 


21 


AUSTRALIA 


21 


14 


7B 


7B 


7B 


71=. 


7P 


14B 


14 


M 


M 


? I ■'■ 


CANAL ZCHUE 


14A 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


i\ 


21A 


21A 


21A 


21 


ENGLAND 


7 


7 


7 


3A 


& 


-} 


14 


21A 


21A 


H 


7 


7 


HAWAII 


YA 


14 


7R 


7 


7 


7 


\*\ 


1R 


711 


51A 


71& 


3.1.4 


INDIA 


1 


* 


7B 


7B 


7*3 


7a 


14 


14 


14E 


7B 


7B 


7B 


JAPAN 


21A 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7 


7 


7 


7B 


7B 


7B 


14 


14 


MEXICO 


21 


"A 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14A 


^1A 


?1A 


?1ri 


?IA 


PHILIPPINES 


14ft 


HB 


7B 


7B 


7F* 


in 


7 


771 


n\ 


7M 


7H 


14 


PUENTOfllCQ 


u 


7 


7 


7 


7 


i 


u 


2} 


:\V: 


21h 


::a 


21 


SOUTH AFRICA 


14 


7 


7 


7 


7fi 


i J 


?A 


?1ft 


?\h 


?\A 


?1 


14A 


U. S. 51. R 


7 


7 


7 


Tft 


V\ 


7R 


14 


21 


14 


US. 


7U 


7 


WE ST COAST 


2^ 


14 


7 


7 


7 


3r 


2A 


14 


:/:■. 


^1A 


?i ; 'i 


21A 



CENTRAL UNITED STATES TO: 



ALASKA 


14A 


14 


7 


7 


| 3A 


3A 


iiA 


7 


7 


14 


21A 


21A 


ARGENTINA 


21 


11 


7B 


71? 


7B 


7 


14 


21 


3ifi 


?1ft 


71ft 


?]fr 


AUSTRALIA 


31ft 


14 


14ft 


73 


7P 


7ft 


7fi 


7 I^ 


14 


14 


?1 


>1A 


CANAL ZONE 


21 


14 


/ 


.7 


7 


7 


7 


I4A 


?1A 


; ; ' i h 


?1ft 


^1A 


ENGLAND 


7 


7 


7 


vi 


~*\P, 


1,*\ 


7 


14 


">1A 


H 


7ft 


7 


HAWAII 


21A 


14 


7H 


i 


7 


7 


7 


3A 


7A 


21A 


21A 


21ft 


INDIA 


7B 


14 


7B 


7B 


7B 


713 


7B 


14B 


14B 


i — n 
7ft 


7R 


7P 


JAPAN 


21 A 


14B 


7B 


7B 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7B 


7E 


14 


21 


MEXICO 


21 


14 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14A 


21A 


21ft 


Sift 


21 A 


PHILIPPINES 


21 


14 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7 


7 


7B 


7B 


7B 


14 


PUERTO RICO 


14 


7A 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


21 


27A 


21A 


2TA 


21 


SOUTH AFRICA 


14. 


7 


7 


7 


7B 


7B 


14 


?1A 


21A 


21A 


21 


14A 


LI,5,S. H. 


7 


7 


7 


3A 


3A 


7B 


7B 


14 


14 


14B 


7B 


7B 



| WESTERN UNITED STATES TO: 


ALASKA 


21 


14 


7 


7 


3ft 


3A 


3A 


7 


7 


14 


21A 


21A 


ARGENTINA 


21 


14 


7B 


?B 


7B 


7 


7R 


14 


?1 


?1A 


71A 


?1A 


AUSTRALIA 


I'-- 


21 


-A 


143 


7B 


7B 


7B 


7B 


14 


M 


21 


21 A 


CANAL ZONE 


2-h 


14 


1 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


21A 


21A 


K1A 


?1A 


ENGLAND 


7B 


1 


1 


3A 


^A 


3B 


73 


Ml-! 


21 


14 


7B 


?I< 


HAWAII 


21A 


14A 


14 


7 


7 


7 


7 


3A 


7A 


21A 


21A 


21A 


INDIA 


7B 


14A 


7B 


7B 


7L : : 


7E 


7B 


7B 


^4B 


7& 


7R 


7B 


JAPAN 


2 7 A 


21 


7B 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7B 


14 


21A 


MEXICO 


21 


H 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14A 


?1A 


?1A 


21ft 


^?1A 


PHILIPPINES 


21A 


14 


14F 


-7B 


7B 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7H 


7fl 


1.4A 


PUERTO R\ CD 


14Tt 


14 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


14 


21A 


21 A 


2IA 


sui 


SOUTH AFRICA 


14 


7 


7 


7 


7B 


7B 


73. 


14 


21A 


?1A 


71 


14A 


U.S.S, R. 


7B 


7 


7 


3A 


3ft 


^Q 


7R 


14R 


14R 


Ur 


7B 


7R 


EAST COAST 


21 


14 


7 


7 


7 


3A 


^A 


14 


21A 


?1R 


?ia 


21A 



A = Next higher frequency may also be useful. 
B = Difficult circuit this period. 

First letter = night waves. Second = day waves. 

G = Good, F = Fair, P-Poor. *= Chance of solar flares, 

# = Chance of aurora. 

NOTE THAT NIGHT WAVE LETTER NOW COMES FIRST, 



JANUARY | 

SUN MON TUE WED THU FR| SAT 




1 
F/G 


2 

G/G 


3 

G/G 


4 

G/G 


5 

F/G 


6 

F/F 


7 
G/G 


8 

G/G 


9 

G/G 


10 

F/F 


11 

F/F 


12 

F/G 


13 

G/G 


14 

G/G 


15 

F/G 


16 

F/F 


17 

P/F 


18 

F/F 


19 

F/G 


20 

G/G 


21 

G/G 


22 

F/G 


23 F/F 

30 F/G 


24 F/G 25 

31 G/Q | G/G 


26 

6/G 


27 

G/G* 


28 

F/F* 


29 

P/F 



162 73 Magazine • January, 1983 



•n 



QUITE A SIGHT! 

(AND EASY TO SEE, TOO!!) 



Sporting an all-new Liquid Crystal Display, the FT-230R is Yaesu T s high-performance answer to 
your call for a very affordable 2 meter mobile rig with an easy-to-read frequency display! 
The FT-230R combines microprocessor convenience, a sensitive receiver, a powerful yet clean 
transmitter strip, and the new dimension of LCD frequency readout. See your Authorized Yaesu 
Dealer today — and go home with your new FT-230R! 



jPU A< 



V 




yAESU 



i. - ~ ~' 



DI*L 



-m »#« 



VOL 



I F^l 



rflAN*» e 



sivef* 



LCD five-digit frequency readout with night 
light for high visibility day or night 

Two VFOs for quick QSY across the band. 
Ten memory slots for storage and recall of 
favorite channels. 

Selectable synthesizer steps (5 kHz or 10 kHz) 
in dial or scanning mode. 

Priority channel for checking a favorite 
frequency for activity while monitoring another. 

Unique VFO/Memory Split mode for covering 
unusual repeater splits. 

Up/Down band scan plus memory scan for 
busy or clear channel. Scanning microphone 
included in purchase price. 



SALE SUBJECT 
FCC CERTIFICATION 



Full 25 watts of RF power output from 
extremely compact package. 

Built-in automatic or manual tone burst. 

Optional synthesized CTCSS Encode and 
Encode/ Decode boards available. 

Lithium memory backup battery with estimated 

lifetime of five years. 

Optional YM-49 Speaker/Microphone and 
YM-50 DTMF Encoding Microphone provide 

maximum operating versal 



FT-208R 

FM Handheld 

2 Meters 



FT-708R 

FM Handheld 

70 cm 



0000 

0&, 




And don't forget! Yaesu has a complete line 
of VHF and UHF handheld and battery 
portable transceivers using LCD display IN 



FT-290R - 2 Meters 
SSB/CW/FM Portable 

FT-690R - 6 Meters 
USB/CW/AM/FM Portable 





w 



Price and Specifications Subject To 
Change Without Notice or Obligation 



The radio. 



TAflll 



482 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORP. 6851 Walthall Way, Paramount, CA 90723 
Eastern Service Ctr., 9812 Princeton-Glendale Rd.. Cincinnati, OH 45246 



(213) 633-4007 
(513)874-3100 



^83 



»*©WEH 










1 Iff • iC**=*fc 




tit 1 JLU » 

- — - _ - 


» %P • m mx 


mj: 



NOTCH 



K-* 



W. 



HF TRANSCEIVER OH 



LOCK 



f STEP 



$ KENWOOD 



TS-'iai > ' 



SI NO VOX MIOC ALC 



PHOKES 




MIC 




St JZPI' 



-ShRF 






WlC-s>-CA 







0r*% 


B^LJ 




OTCH 


■ 

**USH ON- 


■ 















General coverage, Superior dynamic 
2 VFO's, 8 memories, Scan, Notch . . . 



range, 
COMPACT! 



TS-430S 

The TS-430S combines the ultimate in 
compact styling with advanced circuit 
design and performance* An all solid* 
state SSB, CW f and AM transceiver, with 
FM optional, covering the 160-10 meter 
Amateur bands, it also incorporates a 
150 kHz -30 MHz general coverage re- 
ceiver having a superior dynamic range, 
dual digital VFO's* 3 memories, memory 
scan, programmable band scan, IF shift, 
notch filter, all-mode squelch, and built- 
in speech processor. 

TS-4305 FEATURES: 

• 160-10 meter operation, with general 
coverage receiver 

With IfiO-lG meter Amateur band cover- 
age, including WARC 30, 17. and 12 meter 
bands, it also features a 150 kHz-30 MHz 
general coverage receiver. Innovative UP- 
con version dim hi L PLL Circuit for superior 
frequency staSilhy and accuracy* UP/ 
DOWN band switches for Amateur bands 
or 1-MH2 steps across entire 150 kHz 
30 MHz range Two digital VFO's contin- 
uously tuneable from band to band. Band 
information output on rear panel. 

• USB, LSB* CW, AM, with optional FM 

Ope i -.,[. s on USB, LSB. CW. and AM. wjth 

optional pm. internally Installed. AGC time 
constant automatically selected by mode, 

• Compact, lightweight design 
Measures only 10-5/8 (2701 W x 3-3/4 (96) 
H x 10-7/8 (275) D. inches imml. weighs 
only 14.3 lbs (6,5 kg l 

• Superior receiver dynamic range 
Use of 2SK125 Junction type FETs in 
the Dyna-Mix hJgfa sensitivity* balanced, 
dirni mixer circuit provides superior 
dynamic range. 

• 10-Hz step dual digital VFO's 

10-11/ Mrp dual digital VFO's operate Inde- 
pendently, include band find mode infor- 
mation, DifTereni band and mode cross 
operation possible, Dial torque adjustable- 
STEP switch for tuning In lO Hz or 100 Hz 
steps. A-B switch quickly shifts u B m VFO 



to the same frequency and mode as *A* 
VFO, or \ k e-versa. VFO LO< vitch pro- 
vided, RIT control tun FO or memory. 
UP-pOWN manual s« ;m possible uslnj; 
optipnal microphone. 

• Eight memories store frequency, mode, 
and band data 

Wej lories store frequency, mode, and 
bani daui. Eighth nirt lory su nvs receive 
and transmit frequen- es independently, 
M.CH switch for operation of memory as 
hi d< pendent VFT3, or fixed frequency. 

• Lithium battery memory back-up 
Bstipated five-year lilt:. 

■ Meriory scan 
Sea is memories in which data is stored. 

• Programmable automatic band scan 
Sea is programmed b*md width Scan 
speed adjustable. HOLD switch interrupts 
hi in \ or memory sean- 

• IF shift circuit for minimum QRM. 

IF pfssband may be moved to place Inler- 
ferr ng signals outside the pa^sband, i 
best interlrreuee rejec ion, 

• Tur cable notch filter built-in 

Dee j w sharp, tuneable, audio notch niter 

• Narrow-wide filter selection 
NAIf-WlDE switch for IF filter selection on 
SSR CW, or AM, when optional filters an 
instiled. (2,4 kHz IF filter built -In.) 

• Speech processor built-in 

Improves intelligibility, increases average 
- t;tlk-power7 

• Fluorescent tube digital display 
Indicates frequency to 100 Hz (10 Hz 
modifiable). 



• All solid-state technology 

Input rated 250 W PEP on SSB, 200 
DC on CW, 120 W on FM (optional), \ 
n AM. Built-in cooling fan, muhi t lr 
Una! protection. Operates on 12 VDc 
120 VAC. or 220/240 VAC with opdo 
PS 130 AC power supply. 

• AH -mode squelch circuit, built-in 

• Noise blanker built-in 

• RF attenuator (20 dB) 

• Vox circuit, plus semi break- In witl 
side -tone 

Optional accessories: 

■ PS -430 compart AC power supph 

• PS-30 or KPS-21 AC power SUppU* s. 

■ SP-430 external speaker. 

• Mh-430 mobile mounting bracket 

• AT-130 compart antenna tuner, 
80-10 m incl, WARC 

• AT230 base antenna tuner, 
160-10 m incl. WARC, 

• FM 430 FM unit, 

• YK-88C (500 I Ik) or YK-88CN (270 H 
CW filters. 

• YK-88SN (LB kHz* narrow SSB Biter. 

• YK-88A (6 kHz) AM filter. 

• M042S UP DOWN hand microphonf 

■ MC-60A deluxe desk microphone. 
UP DOWN switch. 

\bnr information on the TS-43QS is 
available from all authorized dealers o 
Trio-Kenwood Communications, Nil V 
Walnut Streei I tompton, California 90 

KENWOO 

. . pacesetter nateut radio 




Specifications and prices are subjei ( to thangt t without notice or ohlt^atit